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 Post subject: Transport a Yak
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:09 pm 
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Posts: 335
valfitzandrew wrote:
How do a transport a 16 ft yak on a F-350 pulling a 5th wheel trailer. Pur the yak inside? Or is there another way? :P
Get a fairly sturdy barge to put the F-350 and trailer on, a decent rope, and pull the gas guzzler down there. :roll:


Last edited by Rnykster on Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:06 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 7:32 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Out There
Quote:
I hope you guys don't mind me dropping in from the sailing forum but I have been thinking of getting a real kayak for myself and my handicapped son who LOVES paddling around in a Coleman inflatable yak that I bought him last year.

If your kid likes doing something that really interests him, it's worth anything to steer him in that direction. No matter what his shortcomings may be, things can be made to work for him. Look around for a used kayak if you can't afford a new one.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:39 am 
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Location: Finger Lakes, NY
I appreciate the suggestion. I have been leaning toward the outback, but a "Twist" from Sam's club is a whole lot more affordable :oops: even though it is no where near what we get from a Hobie. As ronbo said it IS worth whatever to accomodate his interests. He is not physically impaired except that he tires quickly and he cannot balance well enough to ride a bike.

I am not sure that my little buddy would get along with a mirage drive system either. My thought is, from what I have seen on the tug-o-war videos, if I have the drive I would be very well equipped to haul him around when he tires out.

Question: how "impervious" is the mirage drive to whacking into things? Like say, rocks in a river on class one or two water (nothing more)? We have ample access to the nearby river and that could make a difference to us too.

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The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 12:41 pm 
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Location: Tallahassee, FL
Good question about hitting something with the Mirage drive. A sideswipe with the bottom, or a rock probably won't damage it. But if you are moving at a fair clip, say a couple of knots, and come up on a boulder in a river suddenly, it will more than likely bend the steel mast or rod supporting the sail or flipper.

One acquaintance of mine startled a manatee by drifting over it, and probably contacted it with the Mirage drive flipper. The startled manatee surfaced suddenly beneath him, launching him and his Outback several feet into the air, and bending one of the masts on his Mirage drive at right angles to its normal position. However, with a little work in his vice and a welding torch when he got home, he managed to get it staightened out and working again. Others carry spare masts just for this kind of situation. However, other folks have been able to bend a slightly damaged mast back into position by hand sufficiently enough to get them back to the launch site after making contact with a submerged object, .

IMHO, the best strategy if you are in a river or any other area with submerged, possibly shallow, hard stuff is to simply pull the drive and carry it on deck (with a leash attached, natch).

I think your suggestion of getting an OB for yourself and a smaller, lighter, and less expensive, boat for him, is an excellent one. And trust me, should your son get tired of paddling, you will have no problem at all towing him with the Mirage drive to wherever you need to go. I think kayaking for kids of all ages and abilities is a great family thing. Just wish I had discovered it a lot earlier, when my kids were young.
Good luck and have fun!
Dick

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 7:32 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Out There
Quote:
"Twist" from Sam's club is a whole lot more affordable

The Twist seems to be popular: http://www.paddling.net/Reviews/showRev ... l?prod=951 , but keep in mind the people posting these reviews are probably beginners. If you can look around for a used one by a brand name company, that might be a good call as well. My first kayak was a Dagger Cayman I bought at a garage sale for $200 including seat and paddle. Used it for three years before I got the Hobie, someone is still using it today.
Quote:
He is not physically impaired except that he tires quickly and he cannot balance well enough to ride a bike.

We take a lot of people who may not be Olympic-caliber athletes, as well as a lot of little kids surfing and paddling in the ocean. At first, most are a little sketched, but get over it quickly. Learning to maintain their balance on a constantly changing platform(the ocean) is a good skill to learn. Being on the water is so much fun to them, especially the kids, they will put in extra effort to get the hang of it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:59 pm 
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Location: Saint Albans Bay, Vermont
Apalach wrote:

I went the same direction with regard to my wife. I thought about a tandem, but knew from past experience (with the TV remote, if nothing else!), that no matter where I wanted to go, she would probably want to go in a different direction! So I ended up getting her a Sport.


That was the same reason I got 2 sports. The best part about the mirage drive is that I can come up right next to her and not clock her in the noggin with a paddle. And you're right with the tandem, we would likely be paddling in circles.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 8:08 pm 
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Location: Tallahassee, FL
Yeah Scott--glad to hear I'm not the only one with that problem. But you know what they say--opposites attract! Things would probably get pretty boring otherwise...
Best,
Dick

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