Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Mon Nov 24, 2014 4:09 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:22 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:16 am
Posts: 14
Hi. I'm probably going to get an Outback Mirage, but I'm in Alaska and cannot see or test one before I buy it. I have only one concern and maybe some of you could help me out here. I would be using it in the chilly salt water around the Kenai Peninsula. Let's say I fall in. I'm 6'0" and 220, but still agile. If I hold onto the boat, will it float AND support my weight? If I fall in with my Sundance kayak now and hold on, it's a torpedo to the bottom. Also, about the Mirage, say I'm still in the water...can I get back onto the boat from the water? Has anyone had any experiences with these situations with this boat?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 8:05 am 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2424
Location: Escondido
Hi MatO and welcome.

As a SIT, the Outback has a plenum of air inside to provide lots of bouyancy. But if you capsize with a open hatch, there is no positive flotation -- it could theoretically fill up with water.

A lot of users buy these "pool noodles" and drop them inside the hull. Apparantly you can get these in a variety of sizes that provide positive bouyancy up to 300 lb., even if the hull were breeched by an iceberg or a hungry shark!

I have the Adventure model so cannot speak directly to the Outback. The Adventure can be righted and remounted, even with a sail, unassisted. However, there is a bit of a technique and practice is highly recommended. In your cold waters and especially with extra gear on, you undoubtedly have limited time in the water. Aloha Dan some time ago described a remounting rig for his wife -- this should work pretty well for any kayak. You might want to check out his earlier postings for the specifics. 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 12:07 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:16 am
Posts: 14
Roadrunner,
With the hatches closed, can they keep water out? At least long enough to right the boat? That pool noodle idea sounds great. I saw in the Hobie online catalog that there's a "sidekick AMA kit," which adds stability. Has anyone tried one of these? I may be overly concerned but I'm planning on fishing for halibut with this boat, and they can get big up here, so I'm think stability first.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:36 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2424
Location: Escondido
The Outback is pretty watertight and should be able to float for hours or days if everything is closed up. That's the beauty of the sit-on-tops. No water enters the hull from the cockpit; the only entry for water is through the rudder cable openings, which are almost negligable. When you right it, the cockpit drains automatically through the scupper holes. You just pull yourself aboard and you're back in business (just have to get far enough aboard on the first lunge so you don't flip it again!).

The Sidekick is brand new and is just this month becoming available (I think). The amas are lightweight, inflatable and durable. The mounting bracket lets you select three different positions so you can put them down to stand up for casting for example, move them up and out of the water for minimizing drag while pedaling/paddling, or inbetween for sailing. I may not be 100% right on all the details but, you get the general idea. I'm hoping to try them with my sail since we get some pretty gusty winds on the local lake.

Here's a Hobie kayak fishing website that you're sure to enjoy. A lot of the Outback owners have done some great custom work with fish finders, rod mounts, custom amas, sail rigging, you name it! http://kfs.infopop.cc/groupee/forums/a/frm/f/5086057385 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:12 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 7:32 pm
Posts: 248
Location: Out There
I've dumped my Quest a few times, a couple times I did it on purpose to see if I could get back in. I'm usually alone on the ocean, so you always have to be prepared for anything.
At 6'3", about 190lbs., I was able to climb over the sides and get back in with little effort. If you can't get back in over the sides, climb over the bow or stern. Holding the boat at the sides to keep it from tipping, throw one leg over and scramble over the front or rear of the boat.
The times I unintentionally dumped the boat? Well, I got back in OK, but my Penn rod and reel didn't make it. When you're out there, keep the stuff you're not using below deck so you don't lose it during an abandon ship drill.
And welcome to the forum.

_________________
Waterman at Work - Kayak Fishing Photos, Video,Kayak Rigging - Blog


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 9:44 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sat May 21, 2005 11:32 am
Posts: 183
Location: Portland, OR
My son uses a Mirage and regularly dumps it to cool off (the Puget Sound while not warm is probably a wee bi warmer than Alaska!), and he can get back on quite easily.

The yak has quite a bit of buoyancy, and I don't think there should be any problem. Note that after a full day of playing in the water and dumping it a few times, I've never found more than a few cups of water in it.

I'd recommend a dry suit in your situation. I use one off season in the Puget Sound, and it makes dunking a little more bearable!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group