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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:00 am 
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Joined: Wed May 29, 2013 9:53 am
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So I am still fairly new to kayaking and I'm at the point where I would like to try to solo this thing in the bay but I'm curious to know how much weight I should add to the front to balance the yak. My wife is pretty against me going solo because she fears for my life =D but I can't always find someone to join me. She would join me but the last time she was on the yak, she got pretty sick.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
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Location: Escondido
Sushi, welcome to the forum and congratulations on your new Outfitter!

If you have dual rudder controls (newer Outfitter) you can solo from either seat. The advantage for the front is that less ballast is needed because your body is closer to the middle of the boat. On the other hand, from the back you can see everything ahead and the rear cockpit is slightly longer on that boat I believe.

The goal is to get the boat to ride approximately level (or "on its lines"), or so the entire hull bottom is at least in the water. This helps your speed and stability. Your actual ballast requirement depends on where you place it. If you're sitting in the back, you will need less in the bow hatch than in the empty front cockpit (better leverage from the weights). To a lesser extent, it also depends on what you're carrying and where you put it (example: wheels in the front seat or cargo well).

From the back seat, why not start out with about 40# in the nose or 50# in the front drivewell; from the front, about 15# in the stern for starters. You can adjust from there.

Ballast material -- rocks, water filled bags, dumbbells, lead, depending on convenience. The smarter guys fill water bags (or empty water containers) at the shore, placed in the cockpit (so any leaks stay out of the hull interior). I use lead in the extreme nose and in the drivewell plug -- less total weight required, maximum CG enhancement and better exercise carrying it to the water. :mrgreen:

Tell your wife not to worry -- you'll stay close to shore the first time or two so she can run out and rescue you! :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 8:22 pm
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Sushi,

I have an Oasis (bought in April) and tried it solo the first time my wife and I went out. I learned immediately that i would need ballast, but I do that a situation that has kept me from trying again. Because of the hull weight and my transportation method (padded cargo bars on top of my truck cap), I usually take another person. I have also spent most of my sessions experimenting with the sail.

However, because I plan on soloing eventually, I went to our local fire station to get a sandbag or two. Upon my surprise, the captain gave me a bundle of 10. My plan is to fill them sand. How many bags? I don't know just yet, but My plan is to put them in my forward hatch.

Please post the results of your experimentation.

Enjoy,
Longbikermike
sent by iPad using TapaTalk

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Mike
Valle Vista, CA


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:17 am 
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Joined: Wed May 29, 2013 9:53 am
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Thanks for the info guys.

Roadrunner, is there anyway you can show me a picture of house to place the lead in the extreme nose? I'm fairly fit, so I don't mind carrying weights. I just want to make sure that if I flip, that everything will still be secure.

Longbikermike, congratulations on the new Oasis. I was really thinking about getting the Oasis, but after reading many reviews and considering my own body weight, I decided to get the outfitter. I also transport it with the padded bars on top of my forester and thank goodness I'm in somewhat good of shape because I'm able to lift it up and over my head and onto the back of the suv. I will post once I finally get permission to go out myself =D.

This kayak has really started to suck the money out of me, just purchase a set of ST turbo fins, gopro hero 3 (my wife says to video record how I ended up missing), scotty mounts, etc... but I'm loving every minute of it.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 5:19 am 
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When I bought my boat, I purchased a cart, sail kit, and two sets of turbo fins. I didn't have the turbo fins installed at first, but I have since installed them myself. Currently, I am researching systems and hardware for my sail. I too am loving this adventure of outfitting my boat. It does cost, but remember, a boat is a hole in the water that you drop money.

Enjoy,
Longbikermike
sent by iPad using TapaTalk

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Mike
Valle Vista, CA


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 9:24 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2360
Location: Escondido
sushiplease wrote:
Thanks for the info guys.

Roadrunner, is there anyway you can show me a picture of house to place the lead in the extreme nose? I'm fairly fit, so I don't mind carrying weights. I just want to make sure that if I flip, that everything will still be secure.
Unfortunately no. I forgot that the Outfitter is the only Mirage Drive without a bow hatch, which is where you would normally access the bow. But it's no big deal.

I used lead shot for the drivewell plug -- mixed it with a adhesive slurry to stabilize it.
Image
The nice thing about this is that it is secured to the boat, is very low for added stability(you don't really need it though) and it keeps the cockpit free for other uses.

You can throw some lead wheel weights in a 3" ABS tube or if you want more compact, melt it first in cans and drop them in. Or you can just throw some scrap metal in a tube for easy handling. Again, an adhesive slurry will stabilize it. This next pic shows the drivewell plug (25#), 3" tube (30# lead) and 4" tube (15# scrap metal). Note the handles:
Image

And if you forget your weights, anything will do. Here my friend borrows an unused wench for ballast.
Image

Your Outfitter is very stable. You would have to work at it to capsize under normal circumstances. I capsized the Oasis once (similar stability) for re-entry practice and it took several deliberate attempts to make it happen:
Image
8)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 11:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:07 am
Posts: 59
Location: Brick New Jersey
sushiplease,

Congrats on your kayak. You are going to have a blast. I'm a a bit heavier than you, 270lbs and I solo my Oasis from the back seat often. For ballast I partially fill the bag below (maybe 3/4 full) and place it far forward in the front well and secure it with the bungee. Even if you had a front hatch, no need to put anything in it with the bag on the front well forward. I also put the black plug in to reduce water coming in to the well.


Image

These kayaks are very stable. I sit with both legs over one side when fishing and even with boat wakes in the Manasquan NJ river and Ocean, swells and chop haven't been dumped.

You are going to have a great time once you find the right ballast solution for you. Enjoy it.

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Tom

2011 Oasis Ivory Dune


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