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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:17 pm 
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Just curious if the Hobie seats are able to withstand rigorous forces.

Whether pedaling or paddling, the way to get the most "output" is by pushing off both your legs and backs, which would put a good deal of pressure on the seats. Any problems here???


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:00 pm 
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Only if you lean back to far. The back folds backwards on me when I lean back too far. Not an issue unless I am being lazy


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:32 pm 
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If the seat pegs aren't inserted securely they can come out and the seat slides forward... very awkward...


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:27 am 
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Location: Columbia, MD
I found the side straps would loosen & cause the seat back to gradually lean backwards after pedaling awhile. Easily fixed by adding triglides after the strap adjusters. The triglides also keep the excess strap neat & tidy.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 9:46 pm 
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The only issue I have is the straps not holding. A slipping seat, although not serious, can become annoying when on a long trip. I have thought of knotting the loose strap around the buckle. Anyone have a better fix?

Longbikermike
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:37 pm 
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Apparently Gas Yakker recommended "triglides", but knotting the cord would be cheaper and virtually just as easy than having to fill out an order form and deal with installation, etc.

I really dislike this whole strapped seat thing. Your legs can put out some serious forces, even your upper body if using your core ab muscles (which, thereby, is pushing off your feet muscles). I'm very wary of the design, but it's certainly not a deal breaker. Just "annoying on a long trip", which is how I'm now planning most of my trips will be on my future kayak.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 6:15 pm 
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Location: New Smyrna Beach, FL
Although the sliding straps are annoying and they do annoy me in a big way, I move around a lot in the kayak and the adjustable straps, with their weaknesses, work fine for how I kayak. I fish 99.1111% of the time. I stand maybe 15% and I sit on my BlackPak maybe 5% of the time. All this requires a consistent tightening and loosening of the seat straps and the straps with the cam buckles work for my purpose.
I will admit that my trips to farther fishing spots (3+ miles away) call for an occasional tightening of the straps, but it is noting that ruins the trip

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 6:58 pm 
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Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
DoctorBuzz :
If you plan to spend a lot of time pedaling like I do ( I pedal between 15 and 50 miles/week every week year round). Then you will find the standard Hobie seat to be a little uncomfortable (mostly under your butt).
You can either get an I-comfort pad or do like I did and use an old pool mattress cut to fit then put into a mesh bag ( I used a lobster bag (available at scuba shops), or some kind of catch bag for spear fishing (available at tackle shops).
Here is a pic of my setup:
Image
I folded the bag inside itself and keep all my charts under the seat in the slot.

As far as the clips slipping, that is annoying, I found if I put a couple twists into the straps before clipping them to the hull they slip less. Also once adjusted where you like them, you typically don't change them much so tying the loose strap in a knot is a very good idea.

Remember the seat back has an air filled lumbar support (at least my TI does, and I assume they use the same seat on all their kayaks), if you fill that up a little it makes it a little more comfortable.

I have a bad back and unless my seat is upright, my back begins to hurt quickly if I'm leaning back too far. When forward you are cradled in the seat quite well (like a bucket seat), and it supports your lower back quite well (at least as good or better than any of the kayak seats I have ever used.

The seats are very well made very strong and durable, I doubt you will ever have any problems with them during the life of you boat.

Hope this helps
Bob


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:19 pm 
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Location: New Smyrna Beach, FL
I should qualify my earlier statement by saying I don't do the miles Bob does. I typically do 2 days a week (sometimes 3) and I only cover 5-7 miles each trip. I do spend 6-8 hours on the kayak during each trip.
What works for me may not work for him, or anyone else.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:53 am 
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Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
Wndrfl :
I only cover so much distance because I 'cheat heavily'. I have my boat rigged to heavily take advantage of the tri-power capabilities of my TI (ie... pedal, sail, and auxillary power (via either hybrid/gas or solar/electric (or both))).
Here is a typical GPS track on a light wind day (5-6mph winds)
Image

Here is my track from Isailer for that day:
Image

Typically on a low wind day (which is 90% of the time around here) I go out and fire up my Honda 2.3 motor, adjust the throttle so I'm going 3-4 mph (about 1/4 throttle) then lock the throttle for the day. I then start pedaling, this increases my speed to maybe 5mph, I then open up my wing jib (33 sq ft) and my main sail (90 sq ft), and work the wind to get as much speed as possible (typically 6-8 mph). I just pedal and tour around until I get to around 15 miles, then I go home (it's my exercise program). It costs me between $.50 cents and $1.00 dollar in fuel for the day (depending on the wind).
I also have a huge 135 sq ft spinnaker but seldom get to use it around here because the boat is already faster than the wind in low winds, so I over run the spinnaker on downwind (basically it's pretty useless) and is seldom used anymore if the winds are below 15 mph (which is 98% of the time around here).

I try to go out at least once per week (year round) and if I get a chance I'll go out 2-3 times a week (time/weather permitting). Once in a while I'll do a longer trip if I can count on the weather and steady winds from City Island (Sarasota) up around Egmont Key then back (about 50 miles round trip). I typically carry about 2.3 gallons of fuel on board which should get me around 100-200 miles if needed.
My problem is I'm a distance excursion guy, without a lot of patience, and got bored going 3-4 mph on the low wind days we typically have around here going too slow to generate any wind to cool me down (it's like sitting in a frying pan out there in the summer for me), so I developed the means to cheat by creating my own apparent wind.
Honestly I just have fun out on the water and being a destination type sailer, I like to go places, and enjoy tinkering with my boat once in a while, all part of the hobby. Basically our TI replaced our Sea Ray and we use it as our SUV family boat for just about everything. I guess it's just my thing to do.
Bob


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:19 pm 
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I solved the slipping problem by thing the strap in a knot. not pretty, but it is easy to undo and change when needed. As to the seat folding, that has been a problem in all 4 mirage drive kayaks I have had. They need a multi point straps and that is where I got the idea of taking the shoulder strap off an old bag. Cinched down to its shortest length and hooked into the eyes it hold the bottom of the back just fine. Again not perfect as the eye holes are not large enough for two hooks, so had to hook this strap on the regular one.

My buddy accomplished the same thing with a T brace on a block of wood.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 10:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 7:12 pm
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Location: Columbia, MD
Just to clarify, the triglides I'm refering to are a few bucks at most camping/outdoors stores, like these:http://m.rei.com/mt/www.rei.com/product/848875/gear-aid-quick-attach-tri-glide-buckles.

Easy to install & adjust if needed. A lot neater than a knot, IMO. You may be able to scrounge them from old backpacks etc. laying around the house :).


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