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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:35 pm 
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Hey everyone I'm new here and have a couple of questions.
We'll I was all geared up to buy a rev 11 when I saw an amazing deal on a second hand sport I could not pass. I was thinking about keeping it for a while then selling it but if there isn't a huge difference in sailing them I might keep it. There doesn't seem to be a lot of people that sail the sport is there a reason for that??. I am assuming it would be abit more stable then the rev but is it vastly slower?. I'm 5'7 and 80 kilos so I'm not to worried about the capacity in normal conditions but with a sail,furling and AMA side pod kits would I be pushing that??
Cheers


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:01 pm 
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I am not able to compare the Sport, However I always sailed my Outback when the winds were blowing. Based on Hull design I think it may sail similarly to the older Sport. I also sailed my wife's Revo11 a few times (shhhhhhh) - enjoyed sailing so much that I upgraded to an Adventure Island.... :)

You can definably notice much more drag in the water under sailing power based on the hull design. All in all, you can notice a difference in light wind (Revo11 just seemed a tad easier to get going), but I would always have a blast no matter which I was sailing. Wind speed is the biggest variable. As long as the wind was blowing pretty well, I was just as happy in my Outback. Only complaint against sailing the Revo11 was a wet bum every time the winds picked up and water had a slight chop. (could be my 220lbs)...

(Note: I added a furling device and Harken blocks/cleats for easy sailing. Since I fish a lot, I am biased to the side trays on the Sport & Outback)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
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Location: Auckland NZ
based on my experience of sailing the Outback vs the Adventure the Adventure was by far and away the better sailer - much more streamlined hull shape - and longer - by comparison with the Outback it was immediately and noticeably faster and more responsive under sail (this was before I got the daggerboard so my first impressions, which I remember distinctly, were that it was noticeably better than the Outback, though this has to be considered a relative thing: neither of these boats is going to win a yacht race unless it were against other sailing kayaks).

my gut feeling is that the difference between the sport and the revo will be not dissimilar but if there's somebody out there who has experience of both I would suggest that you base a decision on their advice over anything theoretical from me or others.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 9:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 9:27 pm
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I pedaled the Sport for a year before I switched to a Revo11: the Revo is more streamlined, making it a bit faster and a bit more agile, but its also more tippy. The 2014 Sport however, has had some major enhancements and if I had to do it all over again, I might buy a new Sport over the Revo 11.

I cannot comment on the sailing the Sport, but sailing the Revo11 is tricky in anything but flat calm water and gentle breeze. Your experience may be different but I definitely advise the hobie sidekicks.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 5:38 pm 
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thanks alot guys for the replies I think I will stick with the sport then maybe get the new one as I do love the trays in the sport for fishing and as I am just sailing for fun I guess its not worth selling for abit extra speed


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 06, 2014 7:57 am 
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In my mind, the order of [descending] preference is 2014 Sport > Revo11 > old Sport.
If you were going to buy a new Revo11, just go and order the 2014 sport.

Old Sport Versus 2014 Sport:
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=49342
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=49343


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 10:03 pm 
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Kind of a late reply...having been out of touch for a couple years. We have sailed Sports quite a bit over the last ten years. They are certainly stable, under sail, and we have learned to use the "sailing" as a mileage stretcher on big waters. A couple of tips, from our experience:
1. Carry some additional small bungee cords (shock cords) that do not have sharp metal hooks. When the wind gets too big, its nice to drop the rig in the water, roll the sail, tie it up, and put the sail into a paddle holder until you can get to shore or a calmer bay/inlet. You should use additional lines to keep the sail from coming loose while doing this trick, and dont let to much stick out ahead of the boat or you will stick it into waves. As soon as safe, get the sail off, folded and stowed, and the mast back into the paddle holder. When it is going to be a big, wet, and "ugly into waves" to get home, pull the mast apart, wind the shock cords on tightly, and restow on the side.
2. ALWAYS tape the two-piece mast together with black electrical tape before you head out. You do not want the mast to separate while your are busy derigging in the middle of big water. Also, pay strict attention to the batten retaining line....I use a figure eight knot on the end of the tie offs, and a piece of duct tape on really bad days.
3. We also have a 60" piece of black, Schedule 40, 2.5" ABS plastic pipe. Using flat tie down straps, over the tube, fed down through the rear drain holes, out to the sides, up over the pipe, then back under and up through the hole (repeated on both sides of the kayak with one strap, tensioned in the middle with a shock cord over the pipe)....we connect two Sports as one very stable catamaran. The flat straps are against the bottom/sides of the hull, from the holes outward and up the sides...so there is a little extra drag. We arent going all the fast, anyway. This arrangement lets one person pedal and steer, alternating, or both together, or both sails can be used, or just one. Downwind speed is pretty impressive this way. For some reason, the "catamaran" seems to surf pretty easily off of boat wakes when running under both sails.

The flat gunnels across the back of the Sports are really great for "catamaran" kayaking, and the added stability will really save your overall energy when you get a long way out in the middle of something like Flaming Gorge Reservoir (only a little over 100 miles long, after all). We've used this often, without sails, because it is so relaxing and comfortable and makes for great picnicing on the water!

JimL


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:23 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
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Location: Auckland NZ
JimL, I LERV your idea for turning 2 boats into one catamaran with ABS pipe and straps. Do you have any photos you could share ?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 10:30 pm 
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I cant seem to figure out the picture method. I will try to explain in more detail (VERY easy to try it yourself):

1. Cut a piece of 2 to 2 1/2" schedule 40 ABS or PVC pipe (I've used both). Make it 72" long if you intend to sail together (I said 60" but that was a slipped memory...sorry, getting old).

2. Use the flat nylon strap kayak tie downs, one for each boat. Push the end down through a drain hole, then flat across the bottom to the closest side, up over the end of the pipe, and then back under and up through the same hole. I drilled one hole in each end of my piece of tube, to use a short piece of line to tie the flat strap (to keep from possible slippage). I've never had any sign of slip, so that is probably a waste of time, but an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (as Grandma used to say).

Additional detail: The key is to start with the buckle end inside the rear well area with only a few inches of strap. This means you will pull a very long section down through the hole, across side bottom, up over pipe, back down, back up through hole, etc. That long end goes straight down the opposite hole, across the bottom on that side, up over the pipe, and back under/in.

When that long tail comes back up through the drain hole, pull it over the center of the pipe, and then down to the buckle. Use the extra tail to go back up to the pipe, and then down to the center of the flat strap between the drain holes. Use the tail to pull the center of the strap upward to get secure tension on the pipe.

When sailing in rough conditions, I have had good success using a shorter piece of pipe, notched on the ends, between the masts a few inches above the deck. Long bungee cords or nylon rope work fine for holding the masts into the notch. The bows of the boats pivot up and down independantly with this method, but the hulls stay nice and parallel.

I am sure you will find this very simple, once you give it a try. This is about a ten dollar project...no big deal. If I can figure out how to put up pics, I will make some and post. I also made an improved sunshade mount for my wifes Sport (using the Hobie shade) that is much more secure, more adjustable, and no holes drilled in the kayak. It mounts and dismounts without tools.

JimL


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