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 Post subject: Outback 2012 or 2015?
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:48 am 
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I have my eye on either an Outback or a Pro Angler. I can get a supposedly "like new" 2012 model for $1500, maybe less, $1500 is his asking price - or I can splurge for a 2015 Outback or PA. I'm 6'3", 285 pounds. and I'll be paddling/peddling rivers and lakes, mostly flat water with one class 2 river nearby. I like to fish, but fishing is not the reason I'm out there, I like the floating more than the fishing. I have shoulder issues, so I really want to try a pedal boat. I can deal with paddling, just want to try a different approach.
Should I jump on the 2012, or splurge and get a new 2015 model, or go all out and get a PA?


Thanks.


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 3:12 pm 
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Having owned a Outback for 3 years, I "moved up" to a 2013 PA-14 and the difference is significant due to both capacity and room.
Based on your physical weight (height is not a problem in the Outback), the Outback is rated for 400 pounds max load, where the PA-14 is rated for 600 pounds + the 2 foot longer length is a bonus for carrying gear and is a dryer/more stable ride.
If you can demo both boats, it would help you more than anyone's stated preference/opinion.

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Hood River, OR


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 3:42 pm 
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JRR wrote:
I like the floating more than the fishing. I have shoulder issues, so I really want to try a pedal boat.

The Outback can take the optional sail, which works beautifully in concert with pedal fins (best to get the optional larger fins and rudder). Even constricted water areas work fine because unlike a conventional sailboat you can seamlessly switch from sail to pedals, to power past obstacles or calm spots for instance. I am surprised at the high resale values folks quote here, when Hobie has improved the technology so much recently (roller bearing drive, seats with back support, etc).

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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 4:11 pm 
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We just pulled the trigger on a 2015 Outback. Im the same size and we have much the same uses.

Regarding new vs used, There was a used one in craigs list and it was on the table for purchase until I spent a night on the forums. I read the comments on the new seat and it was the clincher for us. Keeping a dry bumm, being way more comfortable on long rides, and having the options to do about anything was what we were looking for. We have a lake cottage so everyone under the sun will be using it from kids to grandparents. The sail arrived today, sidekicks and big rudder are on order. We have canals to explore and islands to sail to as well as musskie begging to be caught. By the way, One thing that is not real clear in literature is that the 2015's come with the turbo fins as "standard" (blue 13 tooth for the outback). That helped too as its a upgrade that is already done for us.

One thing I found that I wish I had found before purchasing was the posts about primary vs secondary stability. Search for those. They are a very interesting set of posts. I always figured wider was better for stability and it is but..... it is also the worst as well. Just depends on what is likely to cause you to tip. For me its a speed boat zooming right past me as I sight see or choppy water as I cross the lake. For those issues I bought the wrong boat, I should have gone narrower. For the wobbly footed though we got the right one. The outback wont likely be tipping because of anything I do that's for sure. As for the 200hp idiots that zoom past me 20 feet off my portside, that's where the sidekicks may come in handy when I least expect it.

Best of luck choosing and for sure try to get in one to try them out. They make all the different models for a reason, one size does not fit all. :D


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 7:43 pm 
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bluesneaky wrote:
not real clear in literature is that the 2015's come with the turbo fins as "standard" (blue 13 tooth for the outback). That helped too as its a upgrade that is already done for us.

Maybe it was a mid-year change? Better count the teeth anyway because my early 2015 i12s came with only 11. I might need that for the future if my access channel gets silted up, but the forum opinion is so pro 13 that I wondered why they weren't standard.

bluesneaky wrote:
One thing I found that I wish I had found before purchasing was the posts about primary vs secondary stability. Search for those. They are a very interesting set of posts. I always figured wider was better for stability and it is but..... it is also the worst as well. Just depends on what is likely to cause you to tip.

May also be a hard vs soft chine issue... my i12s is an equal yard wide as the pa12 yet there is no lack of secondary (reactive) stability. My inflatable chines look way softer than the PA or Outback, and it's rock steady in even huge wakes from the side. But when I tried putting a quite high seat a la PA into it, the primary stability was lacking so I installed a medium high seat.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayak#Design_principles wrote:
a wide, flat-bottomed kayak will have high primary stability and feel very stable on flat water. However, when a steep wave breaks on such a boat, it can be easily overturned because the flat bottom is no longer level. By contrast, a kayak with a narrower, more rounded hull can be edged or leaned into waves and (in the hands of a skilled kayaker) provides a safer, more comfortable response on stormy seas.

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Last edited by daft on Tue May 12, 2015 9:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 9:39 pm 
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For the record, the PA-14 takes the Hobie sail kit too and turbo fins are standard.

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Hood River, OR


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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 4:58 am 
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Location: Bethany, OK
I have a 2013 Outback and weigh 300 lbs. Absolutely no problem with stability, it's my only yak (aside from the TI) that I'll take out in *anything*. My favorite activity last summer was plowing through the largest waves I could find on my area lakes on higher-wind days. Never felt the least concerned about stability, even going broadside to the waves.

Its one drawback is the stock seat. I hated it so bad I nearly returned it. Instead I spent some time with PVC bits and made my own custom back rest and added a high-back seat. It's now comfy as a recliner! Many people find the stock seat to be fine, but for me 10 minutes on the water started killing my back.

I have yet to try the 2015 Outback, but if the new seat winds up anything like the new seat on my 2015 TI one great advantage is that it's a LOT easier to get up from! The seat well on my Outback slopes backward and downward, so it's a bit of an effort even to just reach forward to insert / remove the drive in the well, let alone something like reaching the sail mast (or fish finder if I've mounted it there). Standing up is right out for me! On my 2015 TI it's a piece of cake sliding forward to get at the drive well or fish finder mounted beside the mast. Standing is a LOT easier, though of course the amas help greatly there.

On the PA, I've only tried one a couple times at demo days. They're sure stable but good gravy are they ever heavy! My Outback is about as heavy as I'd care to deal with by hand. My TI is trailer-launch only, but the Outback I can carry around if necessary.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:05 am 
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I have decided on the Pro Angler after much research. Due to health issues, I was unable to demo a boat this year; however, I have an opportunity to purchase a 2015 demo Pro Angler 12 that has supposedly been in the water twice for $2060 out the door. Should I jump on this or hold out and get the 14 for near double the price? Seems like a no brainer, but I really don't want a boat I'm not going to be happy with at that price. I won't be carrying a ton of fishing gear, but might do a weekend camping trip with a cooler and a dog.

Thanks.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 3:31 pm 
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I went with the 14, as I stated in the Pro Angler forum. Sorry for cross posting, but I decided the PA forum was a better place after I ruled out the Outback.

Thanks all.


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