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PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:03 pm 
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Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Just wondering for comments as to where the correct or ideal crew position ought be for trapping, where the crew continually needs to come in and then go out due to gusting wind conditions.

I ask this because of the side stay position which makes this trapping position awkward. As initially indicated I do not use wings.

As I try to do with my crew, the front pivoting leg is quite straight and is positionioned in front of the stay with foot against the front cross bar for good support. The back leg is behind the stay and pushes out as need be to balance the boat. In this position the crew continually goes out and comes in.

As I said it is not ideally that comfortable for the crew with the stay position coupled with me skippering and trying to get the weight as far forward as possible, so comments from others as to what is a better solution.

cheers
Richard

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:02 pm 
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Location: SE PA/ Chesapeak Bay
Hi,

There is NO one position for all conditions ..... and the most important concept is to keep the "total" crew wieght centered and concentrated together, so as to reduce the "pitching moment" (ie: hobby-horsing/rocking fore to aft) of the boat to a minimum. Now if only one person is "trapped-out" then the person still on the boat is sitting between the legs of the person trapped-out. If both are trapped-out then they should be close together ... usually the fore/crew trapeze I have set slightly lowwer so the helm/aft trapeze can see over them. The (combined) crew adjust their position together fore-aft/in-out to obtain the boat additude that is desired.

Of course this is assuming enough wind to have someone "trap-out" to windward .... lite air, well that requires a whole different technique('s) ....

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 7:29 pm 
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Location: North Carolina
IMO keeping the sterns clean is where max speed is regardless of wind speed. Its even more critical in light air. This normally requires the weight being forward. I would keep the crew in unless depowering isn't enough. Crew only needs to be on the wire when the boat is overpowered, unless you are pleasure sailing.
When sailing for fun let the crew be on the wire as much as possible, even if you tea bag them.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:24 pm
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Location: milwaukee,wi
i learned cat sailing on a 14, then dad bought a 16. i now own a 1978.. 18. when the this thing gets rolling i put my crew way back like on a 16. is this wrong? i don't want the leeward bow to dive and stuff the boat. sometimes even right behind me at the stern, hiked out.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:28 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
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Location: Jersey Shore
richard@pmtsa.co.za wrote:
Just wondering for comments as to where the correct or ideal crew position ought be for trapping, where the crew continually needs to come in and then go out due to gusting wind conditions.


Gusty conditions can play havoc with the crew, but if they need to go in and out a lot, that basically requires them to be near the front crossbar/shroud area. If the skipper is sitting on the hull at the front crossbar, the crew can swing in and sit on the hull just in front of the crossbar (otherwise skipper and crew will be on top of each other). If the skipper is trapped out, then the crew just comes in right in front of the shroud as they would normally do.

There's no "right" solution, and sometimes it can be a major PITA. The ideal soluion is to have the skipper be able to stay put (either on the hull or out on the wire) and have the crew do the majority of moving around. That way the skipper can concentrate on steering. The most important thing is for the skipper to keep his/her head out of the boat and watching the water so he can anticipate changes in windspeed before they hit the boat so the team can prepare to move themselves before they're scrambling on top of each other.

Unless it's really gusty, the crew should be able to stay in one place for the majority of the time and the skipper makes the adjustments through steering (i.e., if the crew is getting tea-bagged a lot, it's likely the skipper's fault for not watching the wind and/or steering through the puffs).

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2012 11:49 pm 
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Location: Oakland, CA
ncmbm wrote:
IMO keeping the sterns clean is where max speed is regardless of wind speed.
Yep. I like to keep the bows down, too. The sailors whose boat looks like it's doing a wheelie aren't the fastest ones out there.

The weight and position of the crew and skipper is meant to keep proper hull trim, meaning you want the hulls as level in the water as you can, and if the bows are lower then that's not as bad as the stern being lower.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 12:55 am
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Location: Rapid City, South Dakota
I generally have the crew start by traping with the front crossbar in between their legs, and have them pivot forward by bending their front leg as the boat heal lessens, reverse for when it heals more. Have them move more twords the stern as the wind increases.

As the skipper I sit on the front corner of the tramp. Moving back and also trapped as the wind increases, rarely ever behind the rear crossbar, a high wind reach maybe...

I try to gauge the crew positioning by keeping at most 4-6 inches of bow out of the water at all times, even when not trapping. Bow forward is faster and helps you point higher.

When double trapping I have the crew put their back food next to my front foot, an
d get shoulder to shoulder with them, that way you brace each other. If you spread out while double trapping the boat will hobbyhorse instead of staying flat in the waves and chop. Working the downhaul during puffs helps keep the boat flat, during winder conitions as well.

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