Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:59 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:47 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:45 am
Posts: 28
So went out with some friends and had a blast. But looking at the manual and just from trying to figure somethings out. First question i have is in the picture below. The red arrow what is this piece called, and its suppose to be able to loosen up the screws and move it back correct? I could be wrong but i felt like it was too far forward (and the screws were seized).
Image


Next question on the ring that you hook the top of the main sail up to, your suppose to use a twist shackle correct?

We couldnt get the main sail all the way up, never was able to get it high enough to "latch" in what are some things to check?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:59 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 2587
Location: Jersey Shore
The part in your pic is the mast rotator cleat. Yes, it looks like its too far forward. Loosen the screws and slide it back. If the cleat is plastic, you may want to replace with an aluminum one as the plastic have a tendency to slip.

The head of the sail connects to the halyard ring with a twist shackle. If you are unable to get the ring hoisted high enough, then most likely your knot is too big. The best rings are the ones with the small loop welded on top for securing the halyard.

sm


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 4:19 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:46 pm
Posts: 235
Location: Greenville SC
The aluminum cleats are supeior to the plastic ones, I suggest replacing the plastic ones.

Make sure your mast track is clean, blocks on top and bottom of mast lubed. Some wax on the bolt rope helps as well. The last few inches gets very hard to pull and makes hooking even harder.

_________________
2010 AHPC C2 #218


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 10:16 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 2:15 pm
Posts: 1088
Location: Oakland, CA
srm is correct, as always. If you're sailing recreationally then set it so the rotator bar points at the shrouds and forget it. If you want more performance from the rotator then tighten it when pointing upwind and loosen it when going downwind.

As for hooking the main sail, if you have the room, such as on a large grassy area or beach, you may try capsizing the boat by pulling on a trap wire and observing how the hook works. Or you could just practice more.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 2:07 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 10:37 pm
Posts: 8
In addition to sliding the mast rotator cleat back give yourself a 2:1 purchase. Both ends of the line run through the cleat with one end knotted catching at the top and the other end adjusted into the clamshell part of the cleat.

Problem may not be just getting the mainsail high enough but ring angle. For the mast hook the tricks told to me many years ago were:
1. Make the knot as small as possible. Yes, a ring with twist shackle.
2. Put a few turns away from the hook into the halyard before shackling it so that it will naturally try to untwist towards the hook. Too many turns makes it difficult to unhook at the end of the day, but just a few naturally work themselves out after bouncing around in the water.
3. When you pull the halyard stand on the opposite side of the boat (port on mine) so the mast rotates the desired way to guide the ring to the hook.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 4:53 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:45 am
Posts: 28
Thanks everybody....More questions


What is a 2:1 your talking about?

What size are the main sheets(thinking i should replace them they are pretty rough)?

On the hobie 18 manual it shows the harken 6:1 (i believe) but shows the top 3 pulleys attached 1 to each of the parts hanging off the back of the boom. Mine are all attached together, whats the difference?

Thank you guys so much. I am sorry for sounding like such a noob, but i am new so bare with me


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 6:16 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:33 am
Posts: 221
Location: Florida
We've all been through it. The only way to learn is to ask.

By 2:1 it means rather than attach the rope to the rotator arm and route it directly to the cleat you attach the line to the cleat and run it through a block attached to the arm and back to the cleat. It helps to make adjustments easier. My boat is 20 miles away but I think there's a place on the cleat to attach the line. You definitely need to move the cleat back.

I think the original sheet was 1/2" by about 55'. Lines have gotten a lot better since the '70s. I'm using 3/8". The smaller lines run through the blocks better but they are lighter and don't kick out of the cam cleats as easily. Thinner lines are tougher on your hands. If you downsize you might want gloves.

If you now have a triple block on the rear becket on the boom you probably need an extra foot or two of sheet. From an operational point of view it shouldn't make a huge difference. It does triple the load on that becket. By using the rear becket it lessens the effect somewhat but it changes the effective angle of the sheet backwards a bit.

_________________
The ox is slow but the earth is patient


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 7:38 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 3:15 pm
Posts: 116
Location: Buffalo, NY
I just got my 18 about a month and a half ago, and I have experienced similar issues/had similar questions. I'd just like to add:

When it comes to hoisting the main, some lube helps. I've read either dry silicon spray or even dish soap helps. Silicon made a world of difference for me. Also, check the sheaves that the halyard goes around. One of mine wasn't rotating, and 75% of it had worn away on one side! I've read that if it goes up hard but comes down easy, a smaller halyard might be the trick. Haven't tried it.

If you're looking to replace parts, lines, or even try to figure out if you have all the pieces and how they go together, get a sailing parts & accessories catalog (free from Hobie: http://www.hobiecat.com/support/catalog-request/) and study the Hobie 18 parts breakdown.

_________________
Mike
Image
'79 H18 standard 'Rocketman II' sail #14921


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 7:49 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:45 am
Posts: 28
Oh and another question does anyone know the size of the screws that holds the cleat into the mast? I am going to have to drill it out, they are seized..gonna try one more time with some more penetrating oil but so far no luck.


Oh and anyone got a link to a place that sales a good 2:1 cleat


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 11:20 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 10:37 pm
Posts: 8
You don't need a 2:1 cleat. Don't know if there is such a thing.

First, I'll back up on my previous statement and say maybe, at least for now, you don't have to move that mast rotator cleat back once it's rigged correctly. As long as the arm+knot swings over the boom without getting hitting the cleat and getting stuck it should work.

Wish I had mine rigged to send you a photo, but won't be until this weekend. See if I can describe it well enough

My rotator arm is same as yours. To get a 2:1 purchase you need one line that goes from the cleat, through the end of the rotator arm, then back through the cleat. First, tie a knot in the bitter end of the rotator line shown hanging down. (Of course, you know to use a figure 8 here and not a half hitch.) Now uncleat that line and pull it out the front of the cleat towards the bow until that new knot you just tied is right at the stern end of that cleat. Move to the other end where another knot is up against the rotator arm (it goes through a small open section at the end of the arm). Pull on that knot so all that slack line comes through the arm. Untie that knot, put it through that cleat through the SAME opening it came out of. Tie a figure-8.

You now have one line going out the cleat, through the arm, back into the cleat. One knot just snugs up against the top of the cleat. The other end you lock into the clamshell cleat and adjust.

You may need a longer line to work properly. I don't think the arm should ever be in-line with the boom, so your photo shows it way too tight. It is to allow the mast to rotate some.

I've seen some rigged with a block on the rotator arm for the line to run through. Less friction, but been unnecessary for me and just seems like something to catch on the boom during tacks and jibes.

I've found an on-line parts diagram recently with diagrams, part numbers, and rivet list. If only I knew where. There is also a line and wire guide somewhere. Do some searches you should find them.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group