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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 9:54 am 
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Maybe its just a trick of the lighting/shadows, but in your most recent downhaul picture it looks like you might have a broken wire strand in your diamond stay- if this is the case you should replace that diamond wire ASAP.

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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 10:43 am 
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On the note of other small comments, it looks like your jib sheet is secured to the jib block with a figure eight knot underneath the becket (pin on top of the jib block)... seems like an odd way to secure the line. The more appropriate way to tie it off would be to use a bowline knot to tie a loop around the becket. I think the figure eight knot will just make sheeting in the jib tougher, because it's getting jammed against the sheave.

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'79 H18 standard 'Rocketman II' sail #14921


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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 10:50 am 
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SNovak wrote:
Maybe its just a trick of the lighting/shadows, but in your most recent downhaul picture it looks like you might have a broken wire strand in your diamond stay- if this is the case you should replace that diamond wire ASAP.


That's actually the jib halyard wire. The picture was taken before I raised the jib and the halyard was kind of wrapped around the mast which makes it look like the diamond wire is broke.


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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 10:52 am 
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SabresfortheCup wrote:
On the note of other small comments, it looks like your jib sheet is secured to the jib block with a figure eight knot underneath the becket (pin on top of the jib block)... seems like an odd way to secure the line. The more appropriate way to tie it off would be to use a bowline knot to tie a loop around the becket. I think the figure eight knot will just make sheeting in the jib tougher, because it's getting jammed against the sheave.


Good to know. I was going to ask you guys that but I felt like I was already bombarding you guys with too many questions, lol.


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 5:28 am 
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roblox84 wrote:
SabresfortheCup wrote:
On the note of other small comments, it looks like your jib sheet is secured to the jib block with a figure eight knot underneath the becket (pin on top of the jib block)... seems like an odd way to secure the line. The more appropriate way to tie it off would be to use a bowline knot to tie a loop around the becket. I think the figure eight knot will just make sheeting in the jib tougher, because it's getting jammed against the sheave.


Good to know. I was going to ask you guys that but I felt like I was already bombarding you guys with too many questions, lol.

The figure 8 knot is a legitimate way to terminate the jib sheet - if you're two-blocking the sheet (pulling it in until the blocks actually touch). A bowline takes up space and won't allow you to do that. It's something a racer would do - especially on a Hobie 16 jib sheet, but I'm a bit fuzzy on the need to do it on an 18. User srm would know.


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 6:55 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
I've always used a bowline to tie off the jib sheet and make the loop as small as possible.

If you're two-blocking the jib sheet, then your jib sheet pig tails are too long.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 10:10 am 
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Location: Nepean S.C. Ottawa, Canada
I use pigtails with figure 8 knots.

Looking at your pictures of the boom, you may want to move the mast rotator cleat back (towards the stern) a touch.
On my H18SX, the cleat is probably 8" to 10" from the end of the of the rotator bar...I'll measure later.
email me off line, and I can send you pictures...

that's what I like about the H18, so many adjustments, so we can set it up the way we like.....

Good winds

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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 3:33 pm 
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John Lunn wrote:
I use pigtails with figure 8 knots.

Looking at your pictures of the boom, you may want to move the mast rotator cleat back (towards the stern) a touch.
On my H18SX, the cleat is probably 8" to 10" from the end of the of the rotator bar...I'll measure later.
email me off line, and I can send you pictures...

that's what I like about the H18, so many adjustments, so we can set it up the way we like.....

Good winds


I'll definitely have to move that back and maybe then I'll just keep that that pulley on there too.


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 4:45 pm 
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roblox84 wrote:
I'll definitely have to move that back and maybe then I'll just keep that that pulley on there too.


You don't want a pulley on the rotator bar, trust me, it works perfectly fine with the line running straight through the bar. The pulley will cause more problems than it solves.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 7:03 pm 
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srm wrote:
roblox84 wrote:
I'll definitely have to move that back and maybe then I'll just keep that that pulley on there too.


You don't want a pulley on the rotator bar, trust me, it works perfectly fine with the line running straight through the bar. The pulley will cause more problems than it solves.

sm


Ok never mind, I'll take it off then. :D


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:58 pm 
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Me and my wife took the boat out today for the very first time and it was amazing. We had a very fun time and sailed around for about 4 hours. The hobie 18 is very easy to sail although the wind speed only averaged about 10mph with short gusts around 16mph so it wasn't too challenging for the most part.

At one point a gust hit us and we flew a hull and ended up almost tipping the boat. My wife was sitting on the opposite hull from me when the gust hit and she managed to quickly climb the tramp and grab onto the hull edge I was sitting on and just hang there. Luckily the wind died and the hull slammed back into the water. We probably would have been in trouble because if it turtled for some reason i dont know if we could have righted the boat by ourselves, we got very lucky.

What was kind of stressful was landing on the very small "beach" at the sailing club. We had to try about three times before we finally caught the right wind to bring us in.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:06 am 
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Glad to hear you enjoyed it!

The Hobie 18 really is a great boat. The more I sail it, the more I love it, and the more frustrated I get that Hobie decided to discontinue it in favor of the less versatile Hobie 16 and the plastic getaway. The best we can hope for is that our hulls hold out, and parts remain available for a long, long time!

I recommend investing in a righting line... $50-70, but trying to right the boat without one is not fun. I didn't get one until after I capsized the first time and wound up on the rocks. You shouldn't need to worry about turtling, the masts are usually pretty well sealed. If yours is all aluminum, it's not likely that it'll leak. If it's got a comp tip, it may be a little more likely, but not if it's properly secured. You can check it by submerging the mast and looking for bubbles. When you first capsize (and you will) you'll get the feel for how much you can push the boat. You can go a lot further with it than you might think! Capsizing is no big deal, once you've done it once or twice. Two people can easily right the 18... it only takes ~300 lbs.

There are a lot of nuances and little tricks to cat sailing that make it easier. You'll get the hang of it with time, but if you pick up a book specifically about cat sailing, it'll make it much easier. I like "Catamaran Racing for the 90's." In particular, there is a "roll tacking" technique which makes tacking much easier and quicker.

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'79 H18 standard 'Rocketman II' sail #14921


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 2:42 pm 
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There is some kind of a righting line under the tramp but I am unfamiliar with how to use it. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to just pull on this rope when the boat tips or untie one end and then pull.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 2:58 pm 
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The best righting line is 4 metres (approx. 18') of 10 mm line, (approx. 3/8"), tied to the dolphin striker rod, and bundled up into a pocket on the tramp. We use an old jib sheet, 44', and it doubles as a painter.

That gizmo underneath is a righting line, but need more pulleys and a bungee.

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'Only two things are infinite, the universe, and human stupidity. But I'm not sure about the former.'


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2014 3:10 pm 
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Really, you can use just about anything as a righting line... it's a rope (or two) that goes over the top/outboard side of the upper hull (better leverage that way) so that you and your crew can hold onto it, lean back and pull the boat back upright.

I use the easy rite system from the Hobie catalog. Simple & effective.

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'79 H18 standard 'Rocketman II' sail #14921


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