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PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2004 11:07 am 
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Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
I'd sure appreciate any info folks may have that would instruct me on the proper way to reeve my main sheet blocks on a Hobie 18. Mine is a '79, and has three individual blocks attached to the boom, etc. Many thanks.

Dan
'79 Hobie 18 Magnum
Mallets Bay on Lake Champlain, VT

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Hobie 20 Miracle


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 Post subject: Try this... rough sketch
PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2004 4:03 pm 
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2004 2:55 pm 
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Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
Hi Matt,

Thanks much for the sketch and detail for the lower triple block.
Glad to see that folks aren't afraid to draw by hand...!

Thanks again.

Dan

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Hobie 20 Miracle


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2004 8:08 pm 
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Location: Riverside, CA
Matt, great drawing!!!

I just had to replace my main sheet and it is nice to know that I did it correctly!

I bought my H18 from someone who raced and he had the block with the becket in the most aft position. My main sheet broke before I saw how it was installed so I changed it back to the center. Are there any advantages to having the becket either way?

Steve


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:59 am 
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Steve L wrote:
Are there any advantages to having the becket either way?


I'd like to hear the answer to that question too.

I also have seem Hobie's with the main sheet terminated at the cam cleat...is there an advantage to doing that as well?

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H18 Blocks by mbritojr, on Flickr


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:03 am 
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Coming back down once more adds a purchase. Easier sheeting, harder to sheet out, longer mainsheet.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:33 am 
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Thanks Matt.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:27 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
The advantage of moving the block with the becket to the back boom bale is that it allows you to sheet the main tighter and carry more mast rake. The block on the center bale is the one that will hit the lower blocks first. If you move the block with the becket to the back position and tie off there, you will gain about 1" to 2" of sheeting room. This is significant since the stock system isn't a low-profile system, you need all the sheeting space you can get.

A nice upgrade is to replace the three single boom blocks with one triple. It runs smoother with fewer opportunities for twisting.

Usually if you see a Hobie with the mainsheet terminated at the cam cleat, its on a low-profile 6:1 mainsheet system - typically found on a H16 or H17. The 18s usually run a 7:1 system.

sm


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 1:29 pm 
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no problems w/putting all the force into bail on the boom vice three.... not really and issue w/clean, non-corroded parts?


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:04 pm 
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On the Hobie 20 Miracle the blocks hang from one screw... not a problem, but yes corrosion could complicate that.

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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:15 am 
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I've been thinking of asking for a while; I've noticed that my sheet rubs on the padeye when I'm close hauled and seated in my usual solo position (against the rear crossbar).

Any solution other than "move forward?"


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:20 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
vreference wrote:
I've been thinking of asking for a while; I've noticed that my sheet rubs on the padeye when I'm close hauled and seated in my usual solo position (against the rear crossbar).

Any solution other than "move forward?"


Most mainsheet systems will allow you to adjust the angle of the cleat by loosening the fasteners on the side of the block which hold the cleat in place. Definitely Harken systems are capable of this, and I'm fairly certain Seaways too.

As another note, when sailing close hauled, you should pretty much never be sitting at the rear crossbar. In that position, your bows will be out of the water and your sterns will drag. It's much more efficient to be sitting farther forward, closer to the shroud. The boat will sail a lot better if it's trimmed level.

sm


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2011 7:34 am 
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Hi, I bought a 1980 Hobie 16 late last fall and have been lurking on the forum over the winter trying to learn as much as possible about rigging (at the suggestion of the folks on the forum, I also ordered Catamaran Sailing and the Hobie rigging video, although I have yet to receive the video). I understand that Hobie 18s use (or used to use) a 7:1 system with 3 separate bullet blocks on the boom, which is how my 16 is set up. I found a helpful diagram on the forum showing how to reeve a 7:1 system, but it showed the becket as being in the middle, and I would prefer to have the becket be aft to allow for more mast rake. Does anyone have a diagram of how this would look? (I realize that a low profile 6:1 system may make more sense on the 16, but I want to learn how to use what I have before I worry about upgrading).


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:51 am 
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Location: Dare County, NC
Bucknut: If you are just getting into Hobies, Right on! If your getting back into them, welcome back!
Image

I got this off the forum from a couple of years ago. Are you asking like this? I read somewhere, at one time, they were setup that way. There's an extra bail where the halyard is tied to hold the boom up for the picture.

It has to do with the updated rake issues to 16's and it's well written about on the 16 forum, i.e longer forestays, shorter shrouds, and pointing ability. If the mast is raked back, the boom gets lowered, therefore sheeting distance is compromised. What you have is fine just as long as your shroud and forestay lengths are as close to original. Search it out and look for credible replies, there are many. You can also search Matt Miller's answers in the search page.

If you're thinking of 7:1 on a H16, you'll wish you did not have it when you try dump air in a puff. My guess would be it's pretty slow.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2011 8:42 pm 
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Location: SE PA/ Chesapeak Bay
Remember that "mast rotation" is induced if the mainsheet stack is pulling forward at a angle .... so if you hang a triple w/ becket from the aft most boom becket, you will induce mast rotation ... if you were to use the front boom becket you would actually make the mast under-rotate .... Now w/ the boat rigged swing the boom out until it is just over the end of the crossbar ... where does it line up??? If you are using the front or mid boom-beckets w/ a triple block mainsheet stack you will be "pulling out" some of the mast rotation ... just when you want your mast to be over-rotated for down-wind performance ....

Now I use mainsheet stacks that are 7X1 Triple Blocks w/ a additional single block on the bottom triple .... since that is all pulling on the aft most boom becket, (and I've bent and had to replaced that becket before ...) I've done the following:

1) using a straight edge I marked/projected on the boom the angle that the mainsheet stack is at when sheet tight ....
2) removed the top rivet to the aft boom becket ... and rotated it to the same angle as the mainsheetstack and re-riveted ... (now when sheeted it's all in alignment)
3) I took the "front boom-becket" and "mid boom-becket" and removed them (I was always getting hung up on them) ...
4) now I re-installed one of the boom-beckets' angling aft to support the aft boom-becket angling forward ... they form a "V" now ... touching at the bottom ....

So effectively my mainsheet stack is hung from two mutually supporting boom-beckets ... (I filled any holes w/ rivets ...)

It seems to work well overall ..... if we want to reduce the mast rotation while beating to weather I just cooridenate w/ my crew ... pop the main for a moment (to reduce the compression force) while they adjust the rotation ... then sheet-in again. For downwind the mast over-rotates very well ... I just hold/lock it over-rotated w/ a boom-vang for long downwind runs ....

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H-18 mag/ #9458
Fleet 54 Div 11


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