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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 4:58 am 
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Location: Pittsboro NC
Dragging this out of the archives I know but...

The question referenced the set screws as plastic, is that for sure? Mine look and behave like metal and are well and truly jammed. Therefore my question is how to best remove the seized set screws and what part to replace them with? Any help appreciated

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:23 am 
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Location: Detroit, MI
I had the same problem when I bought my 14 - someone thought they were being clever by replacing the plastic set screws with steel - with the boat used in salt water.

By the time I got the boat, there was no way to remove them. They were completely and truly fused to the aluminum casting.

Since they serve little purpose anyway, I just ground them flush to the casting with a Dremel tool.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 6:01 am 
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Thanks Mbounds, that was my next question. I will likely go with that and grind them flush, unless by some miracle I can heat and pull them. They look like a hex head, but none of my hex wrenches fit tightly enough to feel comfortable really pushing them. Are my aging eyes playing tricks on the type of head?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 7:10 am 
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No, you're eyes are not playing tricks - it's a hex-head set screw. You'll strip out the head long before it moves.

The only way that I can think of to get it out is to drill it using a press and clamping the casting very securely. Even then, getting the right angle is tough. It's not worth the time.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 7:30 am 
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Thanks MB - I will dremmel and fugedaboudit :)

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:36 am 
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Location: Virginia Beach VA
Since I started this thread a couple years ago I would just like to reiterate the use of plumbers teflon tape around the Delrin screws as opposed to the temporary benefit of grease or anti-seize. After two years and much salt and sand later my tensioner screws are turning as smoothly and easily as the day I rebuilt them. Hobie should do this at the factory.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 2:11 pm 
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
thanks for the teflon tip... i drilled mine out... then burnt the scraps left behind and cleaned up the threads with a hunk of threaded pipe i think it was 3/4 inch....
one year in the ocean and they were seized again... next time i rebuild them i will try the teflon..... cheers

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1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib[/size]
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:28 pm 
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Ditto here for the teflon tape. I considered using it but decided to just use a good bit of marine grease.
Thanks for the info.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:08 pm 
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Location: West Michigan (Grand Rapids, Holland Area)
Recently made my own replacement screws with stainless steel set screws from mcmaster and a little bit of handy work.

Screws were less than $1.50 each, I bought 3 different lengths and three of each spent like $12.
Sanded down the end with a belt sander (set screws have a little cup on the end)
Drilled a hole with a drill press for water draining.

I only sail in fresh water so I'm not too worried about corrosion, I also used anti-seize to help prevent problems. I'll be able to get a lot more muscle turning these that those plastic ones.

To remove the old screws I used a 5/8" wood butterfly/spade bit then followed with a 3/4-10 tap (absolutely necessary) easy job.

Here are some pics:
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 5:44 am 
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Location: Ottawa, Canada
Now that you're done with the easy part ...

just kidding. The rake adjustment screws are a joke. Mostly useful for setting how deep a hole you want in the front of your rudder. Ignore them and you'll be fine. Make sure that when your rudders are latched all the way down they are within 1/8" of the bottom of the rudder head. If that doesn't fix your weather helm then fill and redrill.

Good luck. I actually find working on boats and rudders fun.


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