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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:24 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:13 am
Posts: 9
Location: Colorado
I want to get into sailing, and was thinking that a Hobie 16 might be the way to go...

Are Hobie 16's ok for an complete begginer (only sailed one time on a JY15) and what should I watch out for in buying a used boat?

Also if anyone has any thoughts on where to locate used boats in the colorado area, I would be most grateful...

Junior


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 1:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 1:49 pm
Posts: 110
Location: Jamestown, RI
Just my opinion, but a 14 might be a better idea for a complete beginner. It is a much simpler rig, and is alot easier to single hand. I started on a 14, sailed it for a season, learned the basics, did some work to it (also learned some basic repairs), and will probably sell it at a profit to finance a 16.

A 14's mast is easy to step/unstep by myself, I can pull it up the beach on my own, and I can right it on my own when I push it too hard. If you have a reliable and available crew to help you with a 16, then that might be the way to go, but otheriwse I would recommend a 14. Too bad you are in CO, or I would sell you mine.

Marcus
H14
Narragansett Bay

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Marcus
H16
Narragansett Bay, RI


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 5:07 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:13 am
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Location: Colorado
Thanks for the input... I should have also said that I would be sailing with my wife, and that we will both be taking a 'Basic Keelboat Sailing' short course and were thinking about joining a "why buy" program.

So I guess that by the time we picked up our own little boat we wouldn't be completely new.....

Also, are the hulls physically and permantly tied to gether or will the come apart. I guess I was wondering how small the boat can be stored and even transported... would it be possible for a cartop transport??

Thanks again

Junior


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 4:53 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 9:32 pm
Posts: 198
Location: West Texas
While the hulls aren't *permanently* connected, you wouldn't necessarily want to take the boat apart to transport it, either. I have heard some people say they car-top Hobies, but most of us just pull it on a trailer. (see pic below)

Image

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Warm regards,

Jim

Image

"A little crazy but with big balls."


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 9:01 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 6:39 am
Posts: 471
Location: Finger Lakes, NY
There was a great thread about car topping with some neat drawings by mmiller at http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=1100

I would consider the 16 if there are two of you. If you are beginning and don't have a "guide" the 16 can be intimidating though. Some newer models are more "user friendly" especially to beginning sailors. At the top of this page go to >Products> Hobie Sailing> View All Models and check out the Bravo and the Wave.

The Bravo is a really great little boat that sails two and it is not that expensive. It is car toppable, easy set up and not that expensive. Check out the Wave forum too. You might find a used Wave. It is also easily set up by one and sailed by two. They are fun. I sailed one in the Bahamas with the whole family aboard. 8)

On car topping though, even Sunfish sailors use a trailer these days. (Love your towing pic Jim 8) ) I wish I had one of our H16 behind a Nissan Pulsar NX- the rig was about 3 times longer than the car :lol: Trailing is easy, the boat is light. Stowage is another issue. It is just too big to put under the bed :lol: You could just sail all year so you don't need to stow it. :wink:

Have fun and welcome to the world of blow-boats :)

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The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


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 Post subject: Wave
PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 10:16 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
Posts: 1602
Location: Clear Lake Iowa
I would get a Wave. A teeny bit more money, but the easiest boat for 2 people to sail that are used to mono hulls.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 1:48 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 8:24 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Florida
Beware the infamous "soggy/squishy hulls" they are just bad JuJu, they should feel firm, alittle flex on the top is ok but if you can just push on it with your fingertips and it gives (on the top) run as fast as you can to the next boat and try again.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 3:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:13 am
Posts: 9
Location: Colorado
Well, thanks to all for the input,

I'll be going to look at the above mentioned boat tomorrow afternoon... I'll post the outcome later on and maybe even some questions before I make a final offer....

Thanks again all, and hopefully I too will be a hobie cat man....

Junior


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 Post subject: It's a no go....
PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2004 2:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:13 am
Posts: 9
Location: Colorado
Well, I went to look at the 1975 hobie cat 16 today... Overall there were several things that made us decide not to buy it...

1st: There were two soft spots (at least I think they were... she didn't know) just in front of the tramp, one on each hull.

2nd: Where the rudders attach, it looks like the pins drop in through holes in the hulls... there were some cracks... I'm not sure how bad that is, or how common but didn't seem to be a good thing...

3rd: We're getting ready to move next month and space and time might be an issue... we could take over her dry storage for the Winter, but that would add on $300 to the overall price, and then maybe more for next summer too....

4th: We don't have a vehicle that is ready to tow anything... our sedan could be set up with a tow package, but again that would add even more to the cost of a 30 year old boat....

Overall, as much as we want a boat, the signs are sayin not to buy....

Thanks again for all the help

Junior


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2004 5:34 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 8:07 am
Posts: 143
Location: Virginia
Junior,

Sorry it wasn't the right boat for you, but it sounds like, based on the softness of the hulls, you made a good call.

For future reference (since you KNOW its really not the end of the story :wink: ) the cracks around the rudder pins are probably stress cracks in the gelcoat and likely not an issue. The gudgeons (those things bolted on the back of the transom) carry all the load. In fact, on older boats you may see stress cracks in the gel coat around the pylons or even on the lip/deck of the boat.

Also, at 350 lbs or so + a trailer that weighs probably similarly...it doesn't take too much to rig a car to tow. You don't need any special weight distributing hitch, oil coolers or other stuff. That's one of the great things about these boats...you could tow the with a VW Beetle if you neeeded to. Get a good hitch and electrical connections ard you are off and running.

Hope we hear you coming across another boat!

Drej


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