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 Post subject: Jibe Ho!
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2005 5:38 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:27 am
Posts: 147
Location: New Castle County Delaware, U.S.A
It is my observation that the main sail stores an enormous ammount of power. I have done probably only two jibes on a Hobie (16 for the record) because looking at the stored energy of the main sail and the apparent insufficant strength in the rigging.

I am worried that the sudden transfer of all that stored energy from one side of the rigging to another would generate some serious shear force. That could in turn do serious dammage to the boat or me and make for a not fun limp back to shore and then to the hospital.

I personally like the Jibe menuver its fast fun and puts a swimming crew member windward where he/she should be in a recovery attempt.

Has any one ever had any bad experiences with jibeing on a cat?
On all the big boats that I've ever sailed on, all the rigging is so much bigger it was never of any concern to me.

- thoughts ,comments , thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2005 6:05 pm 
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the boats are designed to take anything you throw at them. Dont worry and step up to the plate. So long as you havent changed, modified, or otherwise altered the boat it is fine.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2005 6:08 pm 
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Location: West Texas
I just had an original 1975 starboard shroud snap on me in a gybe yesterday on my new-used H14. I was planning to replace it anyway, but it resulted in the tow-of-shame back to the dock.

To reduce pressure on the sail in a gybe, point dead downwind for a moment to reduce the relative wind, then throw the boom over when you want it to happen. Then you can head up a bit for speed again. :)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2005 6:25 pm 
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Location: Jamestown, RI
You can also grab hold of the main sheet to prevent the boom from "slamming" to the other tack. By grab, I mean between the blocks, grab all 4 runs of the line. Gloves help prevent rope burn if it gets away from you.

I gybe my 16 all the time, usually in the really heavy stuff when I blow a tack and either the rocky shore or the big tanker are approaching. A gybe can get you on the other tack and on your way very quickly.

Also by sailing downwind on a broad reach and gybing instead of sailing straight down wind you gain a real speed advantage, and prevent accidental gybe's which can damage equipment and crew.

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Marcus
H16
Narragansett Bay, RI


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 Post subject: yes we are human
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:06 am 
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Location: Finger Lakes, NY
marcus said " By grab, I mean between the blocks, grab all 4 runs of the line. Gloves help prevent rope burn if it gets away from you. "

Jaime said "To reduce pressure on the sail in a gybe, point dead downwind for a moment to reduce the relative wind, then throw the boom over when you want it to happen."

Here's one more- As you come through the "eye" of the gybe gather in as much mainsheet as possible DO NOT CLEAT it AND pull the traveler to center. At this point put together the advice given before: grab the bundle of mainsheet as marcus said then throw the main over as Jaime said. Make this a very slow and deliberate move- do not rush the turn.

Done correctly, you will have PLACED the main on the desired side BEFORE you actually have the sail filling with wind. 8)

As the sail fills on your new tack, which it will do very quickly, let the mainsheet run free and let the traveler gp. You will be surprised at how smoothly all this will happen and how much control you will have if you perform the prep-work properly. You will actually have put very stay-snapping pressure on anything. :wink:

Practice makes perfect- Sail on sailor!

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The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:47 am 
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Location: Clear Lake Iowa
I was told to grab the main sheet as you are coming about and yank down and let up as you pass the eye. Since I have been doing that, I have not done the lovely pitch pole manuver my 14 and 16 have been so fond of. In heavier wind, when the other racers just let it go across on its own, it seems like such a violent manuver and it has to be hard on the equipment.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:46 am 
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Location: West Texas
xanderwess wrote:
I was told to grab the main sheet as you are coming about and yank down and let up as you pass the eye.

More details on that, please! :)


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 Post subject: Grab and pull down...
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:50 am 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Grab and pull down...

I agree. The traveler can be left alone if you grab the mainsheet lines in one bundle up high and pull down as the boom crosses over center, then ease back out all in one smooth motion. That is a controlled gybe. Just don't let the main cross over on it's own... that can be harsh and dangerous if your crew is not ready.

A fast gybe is my favorite move. You can go screaming around and practically toss the crew off with the centrifugal force! Especially down the face of a swell or wave!

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 12:30 pm 
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Location: West Texas
Whee! Now I have to go practice. :? hehehe :twisted:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 2:59 pm 
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Location: Finger Lakes, NY
Thanks Matt, I was taught differently on the traveler because you want it on the other side after the gybe anyway, but I am willing to try anything at least once. 8)

We are in the middle of Harsh Winter here still, after which comes the season of Road Construction, then about 2 weeks of Summer, then it's Winter again.... :roll: I am so JEALOUS of Jaime!!! It hasn'teven been a good enough winter here to enjoy winter sports to the fullest!! :x

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The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


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 Post subject: Jibe Ho!
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 8:54 pm
Posts: 37
Location: Orange County, CA
Re: mmiller - Matt:

If I read your post correctly, by "pulling down" on the main sheet assembly a foot or so beneath the mast, you mean straight "down" toward the rear crossbar and not "across", or angling, as in toward the side of the new tack, right? I haven't tried that one. So you execute this manuver while, when holding the assembly and moving it "across", when the boom crosses the eye of the wind, or as the wind catches the sail and the jibe initiates? Just unclear on when (and much other stuff you are doing as it occurs), less so on the physical concept and if you could go through it from prep to completed jibe to reinforce the timing, I'd appreciate it a lot.

Also, I totally agree with the controlled heavy air jibes. My wife and I were out in 20+ knots of storm clearing winds a few weeks ago with short sails and it seemed like the only way we could get the boat through the eye of the wind. Tacking using the jib backwind method, even with moving forward on the tramp, etc. was difficult and we missed making it through the eye of the wind several times and resorted to controlled jibes that worked smoothly and safely. Though I have since read in the Berman book that main backwinding is an option in such conditions and will give that a try my next time out in more air.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 4:13 pm 
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Location: Jamestown, RI
Backwinding the main works really well, as I did that often on my 14 in heavy air. One thing I noticed is that to backwind the main, you have to be back on the tramp. You will also be moving backwards, which will cause your stern to sink, and it makes it easy for that wind to get under your tramp and send you over backwards. If you have a crew with you, make sure they stay well forward. Just notes from experiences.

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Marcus
H16
Narragansett Bay, RI


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 Post subject: Backwinding
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 4:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Backwinding... One quick thought on that.

Backwind the main to the opposite side you want to backup towards. The main to starboard will back to port easier and visa versa.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


Last edited by mmiller on Tue Feb 15, 2005 4:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Gybe
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 4:38 pm 
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Location: Oceanside, California
Gybe... Better if the main is not ALL the way traveled out. Center the car a bit. The 16 usually travels out about 3/4 to maximum.

Head down wind. Sheets easing out. Keep a steady turn all the way through.

Facing aft and now on your knees, move towards the traveler car and flip the tiller across and grab with the other hand on the new tack side of the blocks and car. Continue the turn to dead-down-wind "ddw", reaching up for the mainsheet (somewhere higher up near the boom blocks). As you near ddw be pulling the boom down and traveler towards the center then across (gybe) and allow the boom to rise under the new tack load while restricting and cushioning the load on the car and track a bit before you let go.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
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Location: Clear Lake Iowa
Oh yea, on the fast jibe when your trying to control the rate of how fast the boom crosses over by pulling down on the main sheet and letting it out in a somewhat controlled manner, it is best to yell either 'cowabunga' or 'holy s###, we're gonna die!' which ever one fits the situation. There are times when saying 'jibe ho' works, but in most cases something with a pirates 'aaarrr' is appropriate. :x


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