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 Post subject: sail tube/box storage
PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 4:07 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Waterloo, Iowa
I'm looking for an inexpensive sail storage tube/box for my trailer. The main & boom are too long to fit inside my wife's CR-V (that is our tow vehicle). Any ideas appreciated. 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2005 2:51 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 1:30 pm
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Location: Vancouver, WA
Inexpensive? How about a large-diameter PVC pipe or 2 with threaded end caps? That is what I am planning to do for mine (the boom barely fits into my minivan). I don't know how cheap it is overall, but it sure is simple.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2005 5:32 pm 
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Location: Waterloo, Iowa
The largest PVC I've found so far (at local Home Depot/Lowes, etc.) is 6" diameter. I figured a little bigger was needed for boom & both sails without crushing everything. Any ideas who would carry something in a larger diameter? Anyone, anyone? Bueller?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2005 10:46 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
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Location: West Texas
You need to go to a plumbing supply place. Stuff ain't cheap, either, but that's what I did. But I made the ends out of plywood because the PVC ends are ridiculously expensive. I have no idea why.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 8:19 pm 
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Location: New Lenox, IL
I picked up an 8" watermain pipe from a local sewer and water contractor. He gave it to me out of his scrap pile. I capped off one end with wood and sealed with silicone and hindged the other. It needs to be about 10' long and no smaller than 8" round. Rudders just barely fit in the 8" pipe. 10" would be better if you can find it but its a little on the heavy side.

P.S. Add vents to the top which help venilate and dry the contents.

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Newbie on a Small Lake


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 Post subject: Sail Tube
PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 8:28 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2003 3:41 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Western Canada
I found an ideal sail tube at a housing development site. The contractors were installing 10" dia green plastic culverts under the driveways, and they had one that was broken on one end. There was still about 9 ft of useable pipe, and they gave it to me. I plugged one end with a circular piece of plywood, and had a galvanized cap made for the other end at a plumbing & heating shop. The tube is bolted to my trailer with 5/16" redi rod and the cap is held on with a bungy cord. Simple and cheap.
Happy sailing!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:25 pm 
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I also use a 10 " PVC pipe with home made caps - one of them lockable. IIRC 9 feet length is not cutting it. I think the boom is almost 10 feet long. Try to find a pipe with a smaller wall thickness. The pipes are typically sold described as Schedule 40 or 80 - which seems to identify the pressure that one of those pipes can handle. 40 is the skinnier type of pipe - even that version is pretty heavy. Ask around there are types with even smaller wall thickness.

Patrick


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
Posts: 1603
Location: Clear Lake Iowa
Are you the guy on the Blue Hobie 18 witht he New sails tearing up Clear Lake all the time?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 4:07 pm
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Location: Waterloo, Iowa
Hey Xander,
I'm the guy with the blue 16 with the blue sails w/red & white stripes who bummed the rudder parts off you 2 weekends ago. Thanks again by the way.
Scott 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:26 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:43 am
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Location: St. Louis, MO
I looked at doing the same thing for a sail tube. I found a plumbing supply house that woudl sell me a 12" dia schedule 40 PVC pipe 10' long with two end caps for around $700. Very expensive. I decided to keep strapping the sail bag to the tramp when I trailer. I gets lots of air for drying the sails out and it only cost $80 for a very nice bag from Hobie.

The schedule rating is the wall thickness. Most home supply stores are not going to move away from the schedule 80 and 40. You can always special order some other sizes, but anytime you special order stuff... $$$$.

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Nick

Current Boat
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Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:43 am 
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Location: Waterloo, Iowa
Geez, you can get the actual Hobie sail tube from their catalog for about half that price. :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:59 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
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Location: Clear Lake Iowa
Next time you're up here, look at the box we built. Its light and cheap and hold all the s### you could want.
cw


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 10:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 1:30 pm
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Location: Vancouver, WA
I still like the simplicity of a tube, but not the expense that it it sounding like.

Anyone know how much corrugated plastic drainage pipe is? It's perfectly strong enough for the use, wouldn't be too hard to cap with plywood, and can't possibly be that expensive since it's not made to withstand any sort of pressure.

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Unofficial Fleet 72 Communications Officer and Div 4 Webmaster
http://www.hobiefleet72.org
http://www.div4.hobieclass.com/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 12:27 pm 
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Location: Waterloo, Iowa
Xander, you need to post a picture of yours someplace so everyone here can take a peek at it and see how it's built. I'll stop and see it in person next time I'm at the lake.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 6:24 am 
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corrugated plastic drainage pipe works too ... I have seen other sailors using those. I think they are cheaper. They seem to come only in black - so stuff gets hot and water seem to collect in the corrugated plastic.
Give it some time - you probabely can find a damaged one, or find someone who gives one away for free. (10" in schedule 40 seemst to be the most common stuff)

Patrick


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