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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2007 12:22 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 2:02 pm
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Location: SJ, PUERTO RICO
Hi. I need to know briefly and step by step how u people launch ure H16 from the sand and head out with head wind to shore.

Like setting the rudders a certain way so when we clear the sand we can lower them asap and get traction etc....

anyone?

thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2007 3:21 pm 
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Location: Tri-Cities, WA
Are we talking about heading out into surf or relatively calm water? If the wind is blowing directly onto the beach, head out in the direction most suitable for where you want to go and allows you to cross the breaking waves at the most reduced angle. If the wind is offset a bit head out in direction that allows you to head most directly into the surf. Before heading out get the boat set up to power right off the beach. Put both rudders down BUT not locked. In surf try to time your launch between wave sets. If possible push the boat out till knee deep then jump aboard (a little forward momentum can go a long way), sheet in and power up. Don't worry about locking down the rudders till well past the breakers where the water is deep enough. While the rudders are partially up you will have weather helm, but it beats broken rudders. The important things are to get everything set before you launch, wait for launch window (between wave sets), power off the beach and take on the waves at reduced angles (to avoid broaching). 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:00 pm 
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Location: san diego
I just want to add a few things to what fastcat had to offer.
Be careful of your feet in shallow water when the boat rocks back because of the waves.
I like to sheet in the jib & point the boat onto the wind & waves until I'm ready to fall off the wind & hop on the boat. Then my crew quickly sheets in the main while I pull on the tiller. It's difficult to pull on the rudders when they are not locked down. My crew & I keep our weight forward toward the bows until we are safely beyond the breakers. Then I lock down the rudders.
Our weight is back toward the stern when we return to the beach through the surf with the rudders still locked down, We pull up the rudders & turn the boat quickly into the wind after we hit the beach. Again, BE CAREFUL OF YOUR FEET!
If you capsize in the surf, don't get between your boat & the shore. Too many powerful forces are working against you. Lift the tip of your mast & point it toward the surf so that your boat hulls are toward the shore.
Think everything through & practice it over several times in your mind before setting out, and please be very respectful of the powerful forces of the surf. Don't be intimidated! Just be respectful! It's an enjoyable experience.
Good luck! Richard Levy


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 4:59 am 
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Location: Flagler Beach, Fl
One last thing to remember, a 2 ft wave cresting can turn you over backwards if your weight is in the back of the boat. Make sure that your crew and yourself are foward when taking the waves head on.

_________________
Coral Reefer
H-16
Flagler Beach, Fl


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 7:04 am 
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Location: OC NJ
One additional point - I've found that it VERY easy to get into irons in this situation if you oversheet the main. Let the jib do the bulk of the work.

Being in iron in the surf zone is no fun. How do I know? :oops:


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 7:48 am 
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Location: SJ, PUERTO RICO
thanks u guys very much...
another question...when heading back to shore should I lift the tillers to unlock the rudder cams before I hit bottom, this way the blades will lift when touching the sand with no force?

or should I leave them locked and wait for the blades to rise by unlocking the cams themselves?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:19 am 
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Location: OC NJ
The rudders are built to kick up. If they are functioning correctly, let them do what they are supposed to. If they are not, you should look at doing the proper maintenance before you crack your transom. Sooner or later you will forget to unlatch them, or run into a sandbar when not expecting to.

Aside from that, rocks and coral might want to make me think of unlocking the rudders before they would normally kick up.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:32 am 
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What is the lbs preset on the rudders to unlock the cam?

Where on the rudder edge should the scale be possitioned and pulled back to measure correctly?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 10:03 am 
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Location: OC NJ
Most people just guess. A firm tug on the base of the rudder should do it, while less should not. You may want to adjust this based on how much seaweed you usually encounter.

Here's a couple of links about rebuilding the cam, which you may need to do if you find the cams stick. They say 17-26lbs.

http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=1109&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=rudder+cam+tension

http://home.earthlink.net/~mattson/hobie/archives/v1-i8/feature2.htm


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 10:53 am 
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Location: Tri-Cities, WA
All good points. Especially about watching out for the feet and getting your weight forward (and hold to something). As far as rudders, I found 18-20 lbs tension good for the rudders (I used a cheap fish scale to tug on the rudder bottoms). For returning to the beach, as said by others, don't worry about the rudders, they will kick-up. Instead look out for others. Watch your landing area as you come in. I've been suprised by a head suddenly popping up right in front of me when approaching a crowded beach. Having a whistle handy is good to warn beach goers that you plan to land. Drive the boat fairly hard all the way to the beach and sheet out and furl just after landing.


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