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 Post subject: goose neck assembly...
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:30 pm 
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
My gooseneck broke the other day wile out having a lot of fun...
I have found a used replacement part .... but they look different... the old one looks like it should have been able to slide in and out ... the used one is fixed in place...
take a look... i am confused...[url]Image[/url]

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1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib[/size]
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:42 pm 
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Your used part appears to have a "roll pin" instead of an 'E' clip on the end of the gooseneck's boom pin. As long as you can twist the boom pin in the end cap, you should be able to use it as is. If you need to remove the "used part's" boom pin, use a punch to push the roll pin out.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:14 pm 
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The "new" one is actually older than the broken one. The ability to slide the pin in and out allows you to more easily attach the tack of the sail to the gooseneck. You might have to wrestle with it a bit, but once it's done, it's done.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:39 pm 
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As noted... it must rotate in the casting. That is the critical feature. When corroded and stopped from rotation... they can fail as shown.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:02 pm 
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thanks all... now i get it...
Do i have to use stainless rivets here or are Aluminium good enough???

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1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib[/size]
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:55 am 
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My guess just from chemistry class would say thta it depends on fresh water or salt water. Fresh water, Aluminum is probably ok. Salt water would probably be Stainless?

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1979 Hobie 16 "Orange Crusher"
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:31 am 
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ASDASC wrote:
My guess just from chemistry class would say thta it depends on fresh water or salt water. Fresh water, Aluminum is probably ok. Salt water would probably be Stainless?

Actually, it's the opposite, as far as corrosion is concerned. Dissimilar metals and an electrolyte (salt water) = corrosion.

However, we're talking strength here.

That area of the boom is subject to compression most of the time, but I'll wager there are substantial twisting forces, too.

The boat was built with stainless / monel rivets - that's what you should use to repair it with.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:55 am 
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Buy your rivets from a hobie dealer. Beware anything else. I know demasted ten miles out in the ocean.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2012 10:09 am 
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Trying to remember what I long ago forgot - Different metals and alloys are listed on what is called the electromotive series in order of their activity. If two metals are far apart on the list they will interact in an electrolyte (like salt water) more than those close together. Aluminum and stainless can be close together on the chart depending on the alloys. If the more noble metal, in this case stainless is considerably smaller than the less noble, there won't be much reaction. The opposite is true on an outboard where the trim fin is usually made of zinc and expected to corrode away to protect the motor.

Chances are that stainless rivets because of their small size, the probable close position on the electromotive series, and the fact that they aren't continuously submerged in salt water, will be fine.

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