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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 4:42 pm 
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Location: Colorado Springs, CO
I picked up a '76 a couple of weeks ago. However, it's got a vertical crack in the port hull. The deck is also cracked (across).

It looks like it was 'fixed' by applying a bead of some kind of compound over the crack.

Is this fixable? If so, how? I'm not looking for pretty, just structurally sound.

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Last edited by Flying Hollander on Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 4:31 am 
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I think the simple answer is no. That portion of the hull is under a lot of tension from the inward/upward pull of the bridles - especially when the main is sheeted in hard. That, coupled with the shock loading of wave pressure when you're heeled up would certainly result in a rather catastrophic failure.

Fixing it correctly would require getting inside the hull and laminating up on the inside, and I just can't see that being possible given the location. In the end I think you'd be better off finding another hull.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:12 am 
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It certainly won't be pretty, but you can repair it relatively easily. Just sand off the paint and apply fiberglass patches. While this isn't the "proper" way to repair it, this will add more than enough structural integrity. If there are any parts of the cracks that you can't get mat or cloth on properly, just apply fiberglass resin to seal it up. When your done, you can sand the patches down so they aren't too hard on your eyes (or on your boat's speed). I repaired a severely damaged mono-hull dingy by this crude method. It is extremely ugly but it has sailed many, many times since with no issues. I understand that the fiberglass construction methods of the Hobie are different from this dingy, but as long as it doesn't leak, and you apply several layers of mat or cloth in your patches, it should work just fine.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:51 am 
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Given the time, effort, and expense involved, I'd hunt down another used hull or or find another parts boat you could Frankenstein this one with. You can easily sell the leftover parts when you are done. A coat of paint wll solve any color mismatch.

I also agree that failure of any repair here could be very dangerous. If this fails the mast is coming down. It is under the most tension at the time failure would be the most dangerous.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:03 am 
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pyroboy08 wrote:
It certainly won't be pretty, but you can repair it relatively easily. Just sand off the paint and apply fiberglass patches. While this isn't the "proper" way to repair it, this will add more than enough structural integrity. If there are any parts of the cracks that you can't get mat or cloth on properly, just apply fiberglass resin to seal it up. When your done, you can sand the patches down so they aren't too hard on your eyes (or on your boat's speed). I repaired a severely damaged mono-hull dingy by this crude method. It is extremely ugly but it has sailed many, many times since with no issues. I understand that the fiberglass construction methods of the Hobie are different from this dingy, but as long as it doesn't leak, and you apply several layers of mat or cloth in your patches, it should work just fine.

No. This hull is done. Toast. Kaput.

All you would be doing here is repairing (poorly) the outside layer of the hull laminate. This is the highest stress area on the hull - it's not the area to apply a Band-Aid solution.

I've seen this happen before and it's not pretty.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:40 am 
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my vote find used boat and use this one for parts


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 8:08 am 
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Location: Black Hills South Dakota
Thankyou Mr. Bounds, I was looking for my photos and you saved me the time. The hull is done. i have even seen folks add a bar between the hull tips and that did not work. I have solid 16 for sale. 800 bucks.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:29 am 
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It is repairable, but it would be a heck of a lot of work for a very old boat. You would basically have to rebuild the sandwich by grinding away all of the material around the crack, laminate a new inner layer of glass, then laminate a new core, laminate a new outer layer of glass, and finally fair and gelcoat. Certainly not a cheap, quick, or easy fix for a beginner. It would be helpful to know what caused the damage in the first place. It certainly is not sailable in it's current condition.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 2:50 pm 
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I'll take a different tack.
First where are you?
Are you a fleet member? or do you have a fleet near by?

Next tack,
While this discussion is going on I would reccommend that you post in the wanted section the need for a new Hull !!!
You might score a cheap one or a gift.

Cork guy H18

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 3:13 pm 
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Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Cork Guy wrote:
I'll take a different tack.
First where are you?
Are you a fleet member? or do you have a fleet near by?

Next tack,
While this discussion is going on I would reccommend that you post in the wanted section the need for a new Hull !!!
You might score a cheap one or a gift.

Cork guy H18

I'm in Colorado Springs, CO - not a whole lot of Hobie activity in this area of the country as far as I can tell :(

I myself am new to cats, having sailed monohulls all my life (Valk, BM, 16m2, Laser, etc.) and raced Mirror class.

Looking to get into it on a low budget to see if it's something my family will like. Not much luck so far... :(

Good idea about posting in the Wanted section - certainly worth a try.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:56 pm 
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Flying Hollander wrote:
I'm in Colorado Springs, CO - not a whole lot of Hobie activity in this area of the country as far as I can tell :(

I myself am new to cats, having sailed monohulls all my life (Valk, BM, 16m2, Laser, etc.) and raced Mirror class.

Looking to get into it on a low budget to see if it's something my family will like. Not much luck so far... :(

Most of the activity in CO is north of you - around Denver / Littleton.

There are a few names in the HCANA database from CO Springs, though. I can hook you up with e-mails / phone numbers if you're interested.

If you plan on taking your family out, it's imperative you take care of that hull properly - which means replacing it. There is no faster way to scare your family off catamarans than to have "an adventure" - like having a hull break up, dismasting and being rescued - all in the same day.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:39 am 
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I live in Loveland, CO, and there is a small lake nearby in Longmont, CO, called Union Reservoir that I go to, to check out the parked/stored and currently (in the summer) used fleet for visual tips on rigging, etc.
There are usually 15-20 used 16's that you might consider leaving a note on to stir up some selling interest, and another 30+ other cats and mono-hulls, both in the park itself and in the "Club" storage area nearby. Could be a good source for a newer acquisition here in Colorado! I sail an 18 at Jackson Reservoir, where the total Hobie fleet consists of 2 - 16's and my 18. Not a lot of competition on race day = 0 ! And have a being restored 16 at my in-laws place in Wisconsin.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 9:33 am 
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Well, I was able to find an '82 that looks to be in great shape so I'll probably be selling the '76 for parts or part it out.

It was nice to find a cat with solid hulls within my budget - I was starting to fear that the sailing season would start without me... Just one small (3' x 5" area in front of the port-side pylon with minor delamination.

Thank you to everyone for your advice!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:23 am 
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What? I hope you are kidding!! you can have NO delam in front of the pylon !

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 6:58 pm 
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MBounds wrote:

All you would be doing here is repairing (poorly) the outside layer of the hull laminate. This is the highest stress area on the hull - it's not the area to apply a Band-Aid solution.

I've seen this happen before and it's not pretty.


This would be true if you did small patches just over the cracks. However, a patch that extends a foot or two forward and aft with several layers will add more than enough structure. It will add quite a bit of weight though.

I agree, a new hull would be the way to go. But from the stand point of getting the boat back out on the water inexpensively, fiberglass is pretty fool proof. Fiberglass can always be repaired, patched, and layered over, no matter what! It all depends on how far you are willing to go, and how ugly and heavy you are willing to make your boat.

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