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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:45 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:05 pm
Posts: 96
Location: New Hampshire
After way too long of not sailing, I decided it was time to get back into sailing. I’d done Sunfish and Laser sailing long ago, but wanted something a bit more complicated, a bit drier when not being pushed, and wanted to make sure there was some excitement in it. Net result was I found a 1982 Hobie 16 that looks like it was last sailed about 1993 and was stored indoors ever since. Tramp is faded and the hiking straps are rotted out, but the hull color (yellow) is still fairly fresh. Haven’t changed the stays, but have changed out all the lines. Lichen growing on the lines just had me nervous about how rotted the rope was.

Two solo sails in light air (5-10 mph) went well. First time without the jib and second with. I learned that catamaran’s reputation for not liking to tack is well earned. That smooth, crisp tack I’m used to making just isn’t going to happen. Further, tacking to deal with wind shifts is not worth the time lost. Just grab all the distance I can (I live on a 226 acre lake.) before I run into the opposite shore. Which does come up a whole hell of a lot faster then I am used to.

Third time out, still by myself, started in light airs. Then the wind shifted 180 degrees as a cold front came through, with 25 mph winds. Suddenly I’m oversailed and under-experienced, and within a few minutes, all wet as well. Came out of a tack, accelerating with too much sail, and buried the lee hull, and dumped myself into the water. First thing I discovered is that my PFD for canoeing sucks for actually swimming.

Second is it’s a lot better to expect to be dunked then surprised. With no practice and no thought on what I’d do, I was not mentally prepared for the event. I got up on the hull without a problem, but discovered quickly that the Hawaiian-rigged righting line wasn't rigged correctly. After a lot of work, I finally got it into a position where it would provide some leverage. Problem was I could only move between the front pylon and the stay. And I’m already exhausted.

Tried leaning back, and the mast came up maybe an inch. Tried again. Same inch. After much discussion with myself, using words my wife would prefer me not to use, decided to ride the hull to shore, to which we were drifting at a reasonable rate. Clearly the comments about a Hobie 16 not being easy to right are correct.

Once ashore, I got it righted and sailed back home, jib down, and a lot more mainsheet out. Can’t wait to get out on it again.

But first, practicing righting seems to be the order of the day.

Best,

Jim Clark-Dawe


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:28 pm
Posts: 324
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
Welcome to the fun, exciting, and somewhat hard to predict world of the Hobie 16!

Well it looks like you got the first three lessons out of the way...

1. Hobie 16s don't tack well with a jib and are d#%n near impossible to tack w/o one. I can't think of any good reason to leave it behind.

2. When the wind picks up make sure you shift you weight to keep the bow high. It's probably a good idea rake your mast too. That helps push the bow up.

3. Most people under 200 lb. can't right a 16 by themselves. You'll need a bar or a righting bucket. Always put your bow to the wind and get as much sail out of the water as you can (get the wind under it) before trying the righting rope.

16s have a nasty habit of rolling all the way over when righted. I usually grab the ropes in the center of the tramp when it hits the water and hang on.

16 are great fun but take a lot trial and error at first. This forum has a ton of tips to help.

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94' H16 - 114050
www.HobieFleet97.org
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 11:21 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2012 1:38 am
Posts: 59
You sound pretty much like me: Struggling to improve tacks, tipping and failing to right. Add in smashing head during the jibes, and breaking parts. All a lot of fun actually as I work to improve both the boat and the sailor. I think I have finally decided to get the solo righting system with the shroud extenders. So far I have been ok with not being able to right as the tramp acts as a pretty big sail and I get on the beach quite quickly, but at some point I will tip somewhere I don't want to end too far down wind.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2012 1:18 pm
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Props to you for getting out there and doing it, even if it is a pain at times.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:05 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
Definitely this forum is a big help in speeding up the learning process.

I've got the mast raked aft, and probably been working a bit too much to keep the bows out of the water. I'm getting way too much gurgling on the rudders and need to shift my weight a bit more forward.

Managed to get out the last three days. First and second day winds in the 15 - 25 mph range with gusts up to 30. Today was better with wind speeds in the 5 - 15 mph range with gusts to 20. Major emphasis was on not capsizing, and I managed that. Air and water temperature are just too cold to want to go swimming.

First day out, I stayed in the upper end of the lake, where the wind was more sheltered. Managed to get in some nice reaches. Second day I went the length of the lake, going to the end where all the chop and wind was. Luffing like crazy, I kept it upright, at a big cost in speed. Every tack was just god-awful, but I got it around eventually. I look forward to when I'm feeling comfortable with these conditions. Major question afterwards was why, if I have reef points in the main sail, didn't I use them. I've administered numerous head slaps to myself in consequence.

Today was much faster, much better job of sailing. Didn't fly a hull, but concentrating on not dumping really limits the angle of the hulls. Tacks were a lot smoother, and were mainly screwed up by shifting winds. Some good speed, but I could have gotten a lot more from it if I wasn't worrying about capsizing. But still a lot of fun.

Definitely need to get a new tramp, as without hiking straps, there's nothing on the tramp to catch your feet without sliding over the side. And the tramp is so slick that adding grease to it won't make it any worse. I just have to decide between the Hobie tramp or an eBay special at half the price.

Getting the hang of this sucker is fun, and looking forward to standing on the side, hull out of the water, next summer.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 8:37 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 9:53 am
Posts: 37
looks like we are in the same boat! i am also learning a hobie 16after a long long break from sailing
anyone care to describe correct tech for tacking a h16?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:51 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:05 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
cavi wrote:
looks like we are in the same boat! i am also learning a hobie 16after a long long break from sailing
anyone care to describe correct tech for tacking a h16?

Some of the things I've learned:

* gentle and gradual works a lot better then slamming the rudder over
* ease into the tack, gradually tighten the turn, while bringing in the main sheet
* leave the jib alone until you've passed the halfway point, then unclamp it and set it on the opposite side; when you set it on the opposite side, you're going to start to accelerate
* rolling the tack is possible, but no where near as effective as a dinghy, but avoiding shifting your weight early does help
* speed going into the tack helps and chop can kill your speed faster then anything else
* expecting the sharp, crisp tacks you can get in a dinghy is going to make you very unhappy
* tacking for wind shifts doesn't work as well as in a dinghy; you have to be sure the shift is going to last long enough to pay for the effort

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:36 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2004 4:33 am
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Location: South Australia
Just want to add a bit to Jim's tacking tips. Sailing solo (Except for Chloe-the-brave-little-dog) probably the most important thing is coming into the tack (hopefully with a bit of speed) you tighten your Jib to the limit (traveller in).
* Stay well back on the windward side and haul your main to the max as she swings through and if necessary grab the boom and pull it towards you and down (by a 10/15 centimetres of sheet thru the block).
*By now the boat will be bow up and leaning back towards you and this will take the weight off the weather side of the opposite hull allowing a faster turn against the swell.
*Be sure your main isn't cleated on and after you jump across and forward push the boom away (if necessary) while holding the tiller back towards you.
*Then you can worry about the releasing the jib.
*A tight Jib is half the battle and, if you lean out on the back as she swings, it helps jerk the mast thru the wind - dangerous but OK if you jump across and forward FAST!

Catamaran Dogamaran http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1G9FpnTIOI


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 9:34 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:37 pm
Posts: 155
Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
A good tacking video,,,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMka3IeyNQo

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1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib[/size]
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 11:14 am
Posts: 73
Location: Utah
That is a good video on tacking. Here is an article we wrote on our site a little while ago about tacking a Hobie 16.
http://www.getwetsailing.com/tacking-your-hobie-cat-the-art-of-the-tack/

BTW- Good luck with your Hobie. It can take a little while to get used to the feel of it, but honestly, our first love is still with our 16. There's nothing like flying a hull with water underneath your feet and the fluttering sound before you take off. Pure exhilaration!

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