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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 11:41 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:51 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Wilm NC
Here's my scenario:
Winds 20+ knots, gusty.
Limited room for tacking.
Current from incoming tide going with me.
Jib set at center.
Main sheeted in.
No crew.
Installed battens just tight enough for wrinkles in pocket to disappear.

So as I was trying to tack in these conditions, I was having great difficulty getting the batten pocket protectors to snap across the mast at the end of the maneuver, thus prohibiting the mast from rotating and completing the new foil. Got stuck in irons several times, and could not back the boat up either to help me across, due to the current. I even tried to coax the protectors across by snapping the boom.

What are thoughts out there on the batten tension causing this issue? And regarding the jib, thoughts on setting it to center and fairly tight vs. some slop in heavier winds.
Thank you in advance!!

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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:32 am
Posts: 283
I like the little keepers that hold the halyards back out of the way on a 16. It's probably the batten caps getting caught on the halyards. Batten tension itself won't make much of a difference.

It's most important to have your speed up entering a tack in heavy air. You need every little bit of momentum you can gather, and time the turn right on a wave. Lose your momentum, let the rudders flop the least little bit, or tack when a wave is against you, and it's not going to happen. Even though the wind is strong, and the water rough, the turn still has to be smooth.

If you are talking about going out the inlet at Wrightsville, get this stuff down really good before taking that on in sporty conditions.


Last edited by Tom King on Tue May 28, 2013 12:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 12:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
KU,

Are you backwinding the jib during the tack? When I do it with a good wind, the jib flies across the mast and the boat takes off like a rocket. Also, make sure your jib's battens are not getting hung up on the jib or main halyards. I use a jib halyard grip to keep the jib's halyard out of the way and use the last foot of my 3:1 downhaul to pull the main halyard back to the downhaul cleat.

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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 12:32 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 8:28 am
Posts: 514
20 knot breeze solo is crazy... And LOTS of fun...

My experience in conditions with that much of a breeze VERY often leave me doing a "Y" turn by backwinding the main and pushing the rudders over.. It is hard to imagine there would be enough current where that wouldn't work... tacking is VERY difficult solo... The extra hands and mass of the crew really help in those conditions...


What I have been doing as I get better... With that much air the jib is going to be traveled out at least a little bit.... Unless you weigh 400lbs you are going to be ridiculously overpowered in those conditions.. So travel it and and main out just a bit to make sure you carry enough speed... As you begin to tack travel and sheet in on the main tightly using it to help you round up without to much rudder.. Keep adding rudder, and as you come in from the wire, and are just off head to wind, let the main off... As you go under the boom push up with your shoulder running out a good bit of main sheet, then cleat it off. You want to do this to make certain the main doesn't round you up or cause any more drag than needed while turning through the wind... At that point keep a close eye on the jib and move forward on the boat... Solo sitting on the rear corner casting can certainly cause you to wheelie... You have to be VERY careful to be very quick but smooth through all of this... in that much air you are already going to have the chop and waves slowing you down... So be smooth but fast. Then pay careful attention to the jib... You need to be ready to sheet it in quickly on the next tack but slow to break it... The trick when solo is not TOO slow though... Backwinding the jib will help the boat come around... and as long as there is air in the jib you can generally get it to turn... But the goal here is still to be moving forward... Once you break it be VERY quick to sheet it in... Just not all the way... Leave it fairly full until the boat begins to accelerate... and then trim it in...

This is what works most of the time for me... I certainly have not perfected it..




Having the jib battons pop over in heavy air has never been a concern or problem for me... If you meant to say "2 knots of breeze" Smooth is the key...






This video should have a couple demonstrations of the "y" turn in it... But it also contains many lessons on what NOT to do... :lol: So you will just have to make that call for yourself..


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPvRnlZY15U


Heck in the conditions you are talking about... Here is me getting blown over by just a partially sheeted jib.. This after a day of having plenty of trying to tack properly, and resorting directly to the "y" turn.... The battens hanging up ain't a problem.... Or even a concern.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vm4iAiItVaM


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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 7:11 pm
Posts: 4498
Location: Detroit, MI
Current makes no difference in how the boat sails. (Differences in current do, but that's another topic.)

It might make the waves bigger (running against the wind) or flatter (running with the wind), but as far as tacking is concerned, it makes no difference. Everything is on "the moving carpet."


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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 4:46 pm 
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I forgot an important part. As the bows go through the wind, with almost any mainsheet system, you have to pull/push the boom to allow the boat to turn under it. Otherwise, friction in the mainsheet system turns the main into a giant weathervane. Right after that, the backwinded jib should finish pulling the bows around. Solo, you will need to sheet the jib in, just as the boat comes down to the new heading-spotted before the tack began, and sheet the main in as you go back out on the wire building speed back.
All of this needs to be done without letting the rudders flop at all.
I often hold the tiller down with my leg or something while I use both hands.
Best practiced in sets of 10s in different conditions through all wind ranges. There is a lot of seat-of-pants feel involved, that is best built through many repetitions. The goal is to get to the point where you don't have to think about going through the steps-just do it.

edited to add: sailing backwards is a valuable skill to have also on a 16. It can get you out of all sorts of trouble. I remember I was coming into shore once on a 16 at Kerr lake. The spot I had picked from out on the lake was too rocky once I got close, so I ironed the boat and was backing down the shoreline behind a number of other Hobies already beached. One of the lady Hobie crews came running out in the water yelling, "You are going backwards at a high rate of speed!!" I just laughed, and when I got to the other end of the line of boats, I put it in forward and pulled in to the beach. She was just standing there looking, and looking. She absolutely couldn't figure out what had just happened. Practice sailing backwards too.

Edited to add again: the girl yelling at me that I was going backwards, was Garland Ayscue's wife Brenda. Matt probably knows them. That was 28 years ago, or so.


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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 7:23 pm 
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Location: Detroit, MI
Tom King wrote:
The girl yelling at me that I was going backwards, was Garland Ayscue's wife Brenda. Matt probably knows them. That was 28 years ago, or so.
That I do - for just about as long (I think I met them when I raced in Division 9 - 1977-1982). Last saw them at the 17 North Americans in Ocean Springs about two years ago. Brenda doesn't sail anymore, but Garland's just as game as ever.


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