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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:00 pm
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Just took my H16 out for first time ever. For that matter, first time on a Hobie in over 20 years. While it sailed just fine, there was more slack in the rigging than I expected. Without a doubt, the leward shroud was always quite loose. Also, more slack in the forestay than I would think although it is the jib that takes that pressure.

Any wisdom here is appreciated. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 1:48 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 8:28 am
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Location: Clinton Lake, KS
dexter wrote:
Just took my H16 out for first time ever. For that matter, first time on a Hobie in over 20 years. While it sailed just fine, there was more slack in the rigging than I expected. Without a doubt, the leward shroud was always quite loose. Also, more slack in the forestay than I would think although it is the jib that takes that pressure.

Any wisdom here is appreciated. Thanks.




There is always going to be slack in the leeward shroud... As the sail fills with air, or you add downhaul... Or even your weight on the trapeze wires you are bending the mast and creating 'slack'


For the forestay some run a double chainplate and a piece of shock cord to keep it from chaffing the jib... As you know.. It goes slack when you tension the rig. Totally normal.



Now... This rig tension... It is a critical tuning tool. It controls the jib luff tension much in the same way the down haul does for the main... Make rake... Ect... There are lot of theories and ideas out there on this..... and I must say... I don't have it entirely figured out...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjGEppjozoQ



Or

http://www.sunstatehobie.com.au/?page_id=49

Quote:
Rig Tension

The tension of the rig is set by adjusting the jib halyard at the front of the lower end of the mast. Too much rig tension will power up the boat excessively in strong breeze and make it fly a hull rather than accelerate in the gusts. Too little rig tension results in lack of power and pointing ability. In very strong wind, too little rig tension can prevent flattening of the mainsail and jib, resulting in excessive power, hull flying and poor speed. A general rule of thumb is to pull the jib halyard to take up the slack in the the shrouds and then about 25mm more. In the case of the rope jib halyard system with 3:1 at the hound, pull another70mm. As the breeze strengthens to double trapeze conditions, it pays to pull some more rig tension to counteract the compression bend of the mast. As you get overpowered, easing the rig tension allows the mast to rake aft and sideways to spill power out of the top of the sail, while you maintain centre traveller position. This allows the lower part of the mainsail to produce height to windward.



Finally...


http://www.hobieclass.com/site/hobie/ih ... HobieU.pdf


Quote:
This guide will help get you and your 16 in the ballpark, but remember it is only a guide, there are many ways
to sail a Hobie fast.
Rigging and Setup
Rig Tension Remember this is set by your jib halyard. Pull the halyard until the shrouds go snug, not
super tight. In light and heavy conditions, ease the halyard slightly. In modest (8-15),
increase the halyard tension. Heavier teams should probably sail with more tension.
Tip - Put indicator marks on your mast or haly
ard to keep track of your starting tension.
Experiment! You can always return to your starting point. Too tight causes mast rotation
problems. Too loose and you won’t be able to sheet the main tight enough


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 6:31 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 2620
Location: Jersey Shore
As stated above, the forestay on a Hobie 16 will always be totally slack (if you have the boat rigged right). This is because the wire in the jib luff acts as the forestay once the jib is raised. As a general rule, tighten the jib halyard so that the side stays are "snug" on the beach. Snug would be tight enough that the rig doesn't flop around, but not so tight that the mast won't rotate. When sailing upwind, you will pretty much always see that the leeward shroud has gone slack. As previously stated, once the downhaul & mainsheet are pulled tight, the mast will bend shortening the distance between the mast tang and the mast step.

sm


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