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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:34 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:37 pm
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
This winter we plan to keep the 16 at the beach so i can sail on those perfect winter days...
We usually take the 16 to the back of the property and store it covered and flat on the trailer...
The question is ... do you think there will be a problem storing the boat like this??? (mast up... covered up)??
Will the constant strain on the shrouds cause a problem???

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1980 •Hobie 16- Karumba sails - soft hulls now a Row-B-Cat1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:57 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 7:21 pm
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Location: Thunder Bay,On
That looks like an Insurance Claim waiting to happen.Minimum I would have it tied down to those supports.Also for what little time it takes I would take the rudders off (especially if there Carbon),and if I was only planning on using it a few times I would drop mast and tie it down on boat.
That is a pretty nice looking boat ,for the few extra min. Of rigging time ......


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:14 am 
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Location: Tuscaloosa, AL
Like MM Said, at least strap it down. I would say put it bow up, this way you know you got all of the water out of the hulls.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 1:41 pm 
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Location: Saratoga Springs, NY
1) Definitely bow up so it will drain. You don't want to have water collect in the boat and potentially freeze.

2) Mast down if possible- if not, drop that jib/snorkel you have up in those photos- the snorkel will sit there chafing against the jib in the wind, and can fatigue the rigging from the shaking.

3) incredibly solid tie downs. a lot of the damage to Hobies in the summer is from thunderstorms flipping beached boats that aren't adequately tied down.

4) Not sure how exposed you are, but make sure you consider worst case tides/storm surge/waves in deciding if the boat is far/high enough from the water. You really don't want the 16 floating in through the glass door in a winter storm...


Enjoy having the ability to sail in the winter, and make sure you dress appropriately for the water temperature (dry suit, I would assume).

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 6:01 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 7:28 pm
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Location: BC, Canada
waldorf wrote:
Will the constant strain on the shrouds cause a problem???


Constant load on the shrouds is a is actually the least you should be worry about. Your shrouds are rated for static loads in order of 1000 lbs. The issue is a fatigue from wind tossing your mast back an and forth. All your standing rigging, including all the hardware connected to it, will by under dynamic and repetitive loads resulting with premature wear. This is not much different from storing your H16 with mast up year around. For this reason, the best is to store your mast in down position.

As others said, a lots of tie downs is a good idea. If you must keep your H16 with a mast up, I would put a lots of bungees to restrict mast from tossing around as much as possible.

BTW, I envy your location! Here in central BC, sailing season is over and otherwise winds are light. I happen to visit Sechelt last summer and I was drooling at the water properties like yours.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 5:05 pm 
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Location: St. Louis, MO
If you plan to leave the mast up you could remove the slack in the rigging to prevent the dynamic loading. Bungies will not work since they will still allow movement. You need to use regular rope. I am not sure how much snow you will get, but I would rig a cover to shed the snow instead of letting it pile up. Snow can add lots of weight to a boat. I was a dockmaster at a marina in Annapolis, MD for a few years. It doesn't snow too much, but once in a while we a got a few feet. I saw more than a few boats sink stern down that had large cockpits with no or failed covers. Granted it was wet, heavy snow, but that weight can add up quickly. Also, frozen lines are a PITA. Take all of the lines inside and rig them when needed. I do not know how cold it gets where you are, but it sounds like temps are similar to Annapolis (since you can sail in the winter).

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:47 pm 
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Location: Plum Island, MA
Why the angle anyway?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:58 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:37 pm
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
I want to leave the Hobie on this angle ... it keeps it out of the way. It makes it really easy to launch singlehanded. Therefore i will get in more sail days... at 63 even in my drysuit, it is still great to be out on the water.

When high winds come and the tide is to our sea wall i winch the boat further up onto the deck and strap it down but it blocks off the entire deck.

I have bought a cheap $50 12 volt winch that has worked great over the years pulling the boat up the beach, the boat gets pulled up backwards because it is awkward trying to turn the boat around singlehanded. I will put a pic of the hull guards i use when dragging the boat up the beach... (they are made from some PVC drain pipe i cut in half), it is a pebble beach the guards work really well.. I have to hold the boat back when launching down to the water. You can see in the photo that there is a set of standard drain plugs on the top of the forward hulls and I drain any water with a shop vac. I can air out the furling jib between rainy spells.
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Thanks for your comments

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1980 •Hobie 16- Karumba sails - soft hulls now a Row-B-Cat1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:37 pm
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
JackB... yes the winds here are quite nice... steady so you know what to expect....was out yesterday steady 10-12 winds....
thanks for your suggestions.....

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1980 •Hobie 16- Karumba sails - soft hulls now a Row-B-Cat1983 Hobie 16 Tsunami sails - blue hulls-Sold •Present boat -1998 Hobie 16 Solana Sails furling jib
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