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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 1:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2013 6:43 am
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Hi - I'm replacing the rudder locking pieces (delrin screw, spring and plunger) and the rudder adjustment screw on my 87 Hobie 16. They both are original and stuck fast. I'd guess that you need to drill them out without wrecking the threads in the rudder casting. Is there a simpler easier/cleaner way to get them out? Would heat help to free them up? The rivets holding the old cams in were easy enough to drill out, but that plastic adjustment screw for the rudder lock looks tough to get a drill on. Any thoughts are appreciated


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 11:53 am
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Location: Florida Panhandle
I pulled everything off them then stuck em on the bar b que for about 30 minutes with the lid closed. It melted the screws to the point I could just break them out with an old screwdriver. It's a little expensive but if your going to be cleaning up the threads a 3/4-10 tap cleans up the Delrin screw threads real nice before screwing the new adjustment screw in. I can't recall the size of the smaller rake adjustment screw but I know it's listed on this site somewhere.

Good luck!

tm

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 4:31 pm 
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Thanks. The heat idea seems to make sense. I read some threads on beachcats that talks about drilling them out with a 3/8 wood bit, then chipping the remainder out with a screw driver. I'd hate to wreck the threads by knicking them with a bit. I'll go with the heat and chip method. I have the taps to clean up the threads. What do you recommend for lubricant for the rudder lock springs and cam? Is there a type of "anti-seize" you can put on the rudder adjustment screw and delrin screw to keep them from seizing and allow easy adjustment in the future?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 7:11 pm
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Location: Detroit, MI
The first thing to try (before the BBQ) is to take an old, large flat blade screwdriver, heat the tip to red hot with a torch and plunge it into the Delrin screw (don't breathe the fumes or let them get to your eyes - it's like tear gas)

Let the driver cool in the screw, then using a pair of Vise-Grips clamped on the shaft of the screwdriver, try to back the screw out. It'll either come out or shatter. If it shatters, you can clean out the bits with a small screwdriver and use a 3/4-10 bolt (or a tap) to clean up the threads.

Use a waterproof white grease on the threads and the plunger.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 10:22 am 
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Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 10:33 am
Posts: 416
Location: Clinton, Mississippi
There was pretty much a concensus on here a while back that there's really no need to limit forward rake, so the small rake adjustment screw serves little purpose. In fact one person posted that it's sole purpose is to adjust how large of a divot you want punched into the front of the rudder blade! :lol: At most, you may want to chisel off any part that's protruding inside the casting. Otherwise, I wouldn't waste any time on those.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 12:58 pm 
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I've melted out many cam pressure screws with a propane torch. Do it outside on a day when you have some breeze to blow the fumes away-they're toxic.

Take the cam out, and the torch will melt and drip most of the plastic from the screw out. I made a thread "tap" to chase the threads with out of a bolt the right size by filing a notch in one side much like a real tap.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 1:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:20 pm
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
I have a tub of "LubriMatic Marine Corrosion Control and Trailer Wheel Bearing Grease" which I have been using for many years on anything that I want to stay lubricated. I also used it several years ago when I rebuilt my rudders. This green grease is also "salt water resistant".

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82' H16
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 4:11 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
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Location: Jersey Shore
I've never tried this before, but probably the best method would be a combination of the two methods described. First use a drill to drill out as much of the screw as possible and then use the torch to melt out the remaining bits. This would limit the amount of toxic fumes created and also limit how much you have to heat the casting (if you heat it too much, you will likely also melt the plunger and cam).

I have drilled out the plastic screws before and then chipped out the remaining pieces with a screw driver and I can tell you getting the little pieces out is a pain. Either way, you will want to chase the threads afterwards. Use a 3/4" diameter coarse thread bolt and cut one or two relief notches in the end with a file as described above.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 6:25 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:18 am
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Location: Virginia Beach VA
Mine drilled out easily with a 5/8 wood bore (spade bit) then I used an ice pick or awl to pick out the remaining plastic left in the threads. I cleaned the very corroded threads up with a tap I found on eBay and then used plumbers teflon tape on the new Delrin screws. Five years of salt water later they still turn easily.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:31 am 
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
When putting the Delrin screws back in the best thing I've done is to coat them with teflon plumbers tape and grease them up a bit... like talked about in the previous post... this vid may help a bit... you can improvise on the tools... just be careful not to ruin the threads... i used a 3/4 bolt with a lot of oil to clean up my threads...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUUA7l6fzIk

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 2:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2013 6:43 am
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Awesome tip with the Teflon tape. Thanks! I'll have a go at getting them cleaned up this weekend. I really appreciate all the tips and ideas to keep everything tunable for the coming years.


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