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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 12:06 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2014 7:04 pm
Posts: 1
I picked up an older Hobie 16 last season and started tinkering with it. Last month I took it out and noticed that the cam cleats that it came with were basically unusable. The cleats that came on the boat (not sure if OEM - see image below) did not engage smoothly and dragged on the line (to the point of damaging the line). I tried to save them, but all my cleaning and grinding was in vain.

I wanted to do it cheaply and as the whole swivel assemblies are about 60 USD a piece I chose to replace only the cleats.

The Ronstan RF5011 as it was suggested in this post: viewtopic.php?f=13&t=10216 They are designed to handle line sized 3-12mm in diameter. The jib sheet is 8mm and the main sheet is 10mm so I was good to go. The mainsheet actually looked large for them but when I tried them out they worked flawlessly.
http://www.ronstan.com/marine/product.asp?ProdNo=RF5011

Total Price: 79 USD before shipping
Ronstan RF5011 ~25 USD per set - I replaced all three on the frame (the boat came with Harken mainblocks) = 75 USD - many online sources, I actually found a decent deal on amazon
10-24 1-1/2inches stainless machine screws and respective lock nuts (6 each) - 4 USD - Local Lowes

Here are a few pics of the old cleats.

Image
Image

I removed the two machine screws on each to show the hardware beneath.

Image

I used a dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to grind the tabs that the springs sit against flat as well as the strength member for the cleats. I don't have a picture of it but the tubes that the cleats ride on have an end which rivets to the plate they sit on. I decided not to grind them off and remove them completely from the bottom side. Instead, looking at the gaping holes that they would leave I left a small amount of material on the top (leaving the bottom intact) and kept them as washers. It looks like they go in a bit so you can get the top flat without any risk of them falling out. It took no longer than a couple minutes a piece to complete this.

Image

The old saddles were salvaged, but I had to bend them in slightly to get them to match up with the new assembly holes. I used a pair of channel locks to do this effortlessly.

Image

As the holes didn't line up exactly there was a slight bind as I put them onto the newly flattened swivel plate. It just took me using a screw driver to walk the new screws all the way into place. It wasn't anything extreme in terms of binding but I hope it doesn't come back to bite me in the rear as they get older. Here is the finished product. I don't think it came out that bad and they are nice and tight with respect to the plate. Unless something is seriously wrong with your swivel assembly, I see no point in replacing it just to improve the cleats.

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:20 am 
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Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 8:42 am
Posts: 38
Location: Chicago/SW Michigan
Thanks for sharing. I picked up my cleats already and was wondering if cutting/grinding off the tab & post is possible. Looks good, hope to try it this weekend.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 4:51 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 2:48 pm
Posts: 172
Location: Maryland/Outer Banks, N.C.
My boat came with the old metal jaw Seaway cleats, which I replaced with Harkens using Hobie's retrofit. I think I may have a few of the Seaway springs still!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 11:03 am 
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Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 8:42 am
Posts: 38
Location: Chicago/SW Michigan
so I got new cam cleats and pulled off the old swivel plates this weekend.... only to find the cam cleat holes are 1.5" apart and the swivel posts that need to get cut off are more than 1.5" apart. Any words of wisdom on why it would not work to cut off the old posts, use one of the existing hole, then drill a new hole 1.5" away (near, but inside and clear of the other hole)?

The result would be that the cam cleat would now not be centered on the plate. Thoughts on the impact of doing this?

Otherwise i'll just leave the stock seaway jaws in place... want better cams so the kids working the jib have an easier time cleating in light wind. Ultimately not a huge issue in big air w two adults, but smoother action..


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