Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Thu Dec 18, 2014 11:11 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:10 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:04 pm
Posts: 2
Hey, everyone, I have a question which has been bothering me for some time and causing me to hesitate from sailing my Hobie 16 in certain conditions. Last season, whenever I'd capsize my Hobie it would turtle immediately and, even with the help of a power boat, was extremely difficult to right again. This caused all kinds of problems and embarrassment that I don't even want to get into. Turns out that my mast would fill up with water immmediately and within 30 seconds she'd turtled over. This occurred even after I installed a "baby bob" mast float -- 30 seconds, no kidding. After checking with people online, it seemed apparent to me that my mast plugs were shot. Over the winter, I had a sailboat shop here in the Western NY area replace the plugs. After months with my mast they got it back to me but they reported that they only replaced the top mast plug. According to them, its smarter for me to leave the bottom mast plug -- whether its shot or not they didn't check -- alone because any water which does get into the mast needs a location from which to drain. I wasn't exactly comfortable with the thought that the job was only half done but at that point the season had already started and I was so anxious to get on the water that I didn't argue. The bottom line for me now is that I'm a little gun shy about taking the Hobie. I have a righting pole but that will do little good if my cat turtles over and the mast takes on water. I was just wondering what you think of the whole mast plug issue and whether the sailboat shop which I used was correct in leaving the bottom of the mast section alone. Any thoughts you have would be appreciated. Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:24 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 9:32 pm
Posts: 198
Location: West Texas
Carry the mast down to the lake and put it just under water and then try to find where bubbles are coming out, then drain the water and use lots of silicone in that place. Rinse, repeat, until no more bubbles. Then you should be golden. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: not so simple
PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2004 8:26 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:04 pm
Posts: 2
Jamie, thanks for your reply, but you underestimate my problem. As you probably know already, hobie masts contain upper and lower foam plugs which are meant to truly seal them. Although I siliconed every spot apparent to me, my hobie would turtle IMMEDIATELY when I'd capsize and it would take GODZILLA to right her again. This was because the entire mast would fill with water. After doing some research it seemed evident to me that both my internal foam plugs, upper and lower, had failed me. Although my sailboat shop replaced the upper plug -- and reported to me that the old one was essentially nonexistent, having deteriorated over time -- they didn't even open up the bottom of my mast and check on the lower foam plug. I was so frustrated with not having my hobie back in the beginning of the sailing season that I just took my mast back, paid the bill and ran... I kind of justified things thinking that when the cat is laying on its side, the bottom of the mast is actually out of the water anyway and its only the top of the mast which submerges and has the potential for taking on water... BUT, the truth is that not knowing the deal about the lower mast plug has affected my entire sailing character, since I don't push the envelope much anymore because I'm quietly scared of capsizing and then turtling over like I did last season... I know that what I really need to do is lay her on her side in shallow water and see what happens, or do like you said and take the mast only, submerge it, and see what happens... I'll do that, but I was just wondering what everyone else has done in my situation, and whether anyone else has even encountered my situation. You don't read or hear much about these mast plugs and it was quite an unpleasant surprise to have so much difficulty with this issue last year. I thought it was all behind me and I'm pissed off that the job I paid for wasn't completed... Anyway, I'll do some experimenting in shallow water and see what happens. Thanks. Jason


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2004 8:43 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 9:32 pm
Posts: 198
Location: West Texas
If you're really concerned about the lower plug, then why not drill the rivets on the base and pull it out, then check the condition of the plug and maybe replace it, and then smear fresh silicone on the base and rivet it back in again? Probably take all of a half an hour. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Mast base plug
PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2004 6:46 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
Posts: 1609
Location: Clear Lake Iowa
I did the very thing on my sons 16 the other day. We pulled the bottom base, drained the water, and re-siliconed the plug, THEN got some of that 'black silicon' at walmarts automotive section, and re-sealed the mast base and re=revited it. Seems to work pretty good now. Only took about 10 minutes to do.

We were at a race last weekend on a river that was damed (sp) up and it was heavy, and every boat that went over, except a 20, turtled. Pretty weird. Wind and current must have done it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2004 9:09 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2003 10:19 am
Posts: 6
You maybe leaking around the rivets. If rivet sleeves were not installed and sealed the water will leak through the pop rivets.

If that is the leak then the rivet mustbe drilled out. Then the rivet sleeve installed, the item placed on top of it with more sealer then riveted together.

To properly seat the rivet and sleeve you will "need" (I repeat "NEED") an air powered pop rivet gun. A manual gun will not pull them tight. The "Jet Tool Company" makes an air gun that I found at a shop in Iowa on the internet for $100.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group