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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 8:35 am 
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Location: Pasadena Md
After a wonderful and exciting first weekend I drained a small amount of water out of each hull. Heavy weather sailing including 1 capsize yielded by raising hulls real high to drain maybe a cup or 2 each hull, I believe thats pretty good. Water was brown with floatation particles. 1st time this boat was in the water in over 20 years, so I guess thats ok too.

I would like to install a porthole on each hull for drying purposes. The Hobie Catalog states in it's Tech Tip that "The 5 inch hatch covers are about the maximum size the Hobie 14 and 16 foredeck can handle". From the scraps of info I've searched, I read that putting a hole in the foredeck can compromise structural integrity. So I have questions.
(1) I read that my H16 which is a 1981 is heavier. Does that mean the fiberglass is thicker permitting cutting holes in fordecks?

(2) If not installing in the foredeck then is a different size porthole required elsewhere?

(3) I would go with the black due to better UV protection but the installation screws are nylon, wouldn't using stainless be better?

Ease of access and storage space are entertaining thoughts but my main concern is the well being of my boat. I believe it would be a benefit to have some added ventilation in it. Experiences and or advise would be GREATLY appreciated.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:19 am 
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Location: Northfield Minnesota
If you are just putting them in for ventilation I would go with the 4". You're removing less of the deck and hopefully less structural material. I think people have been putting them between the pylons for ventilation, that may be just so that they can get at the foam and replace it. I've thought about adding them to my 06' 16 just for this reason. Fatigue, or impact would be the only cause of death to a boat if you can keep it dry.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:09 pm 
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Location: Jersey Shore
You could probably go behind the front pylon. I'm pretty sure I've seen them mounted there.

4" portholes are a bit of a pain. My last boat had them, and any time I put my hand in the hole, my hand and arm would get scraped up (although I do have pretty big hands).

Stainless fasteners are better than nylon. The nylon will strip if you overtighten. Be sure to use a decent sized washer otherwise the nut will compress the fiberglass/foam. The person that put the ports in my last boat didn't use washers and the nuts compressed up into the foam making it very difficult to get a wrench on to remove.

Not sure that black has better UV protection. It could possibly fade though and will build up more heat.

sm


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:37 pm 
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Location: Spokane, WA
Swampcreek,
I installed ports in my H16. Check the details at my previous post:

http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=5108&highlight=

Here's a pic of the port forward of the pylon:

Image

This type makes it real easy to quickly inspect the hulls for water. Hope this helps.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:16 pm 
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srm wrote:
(although I do have pretty big hands


You know what they say about big hands?


Big gloves :roll:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:33 pm 
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Location: Clinton, Mississippi
First of all...congrats that your boat doesn't leak much! Second....please don't put any holes in your boat unless absolutely necessary (e.g. to access for interior repair). Hobie didn't do it, and the fact that you're sailing a 26 year old boat is a pretty good testament to their judgement. If you'll drain your hulls each time you sail and leave the plugs out (only while while not sailing!), it'll ventilate fine. But to answer some of your questions...


Quote:
(1) I read that my H16 which is a 1981 is heavier. Does that mean the fiberglass is thicker permitting cutting holes in fordecks?


No

Quote:
(2) If not installing in the foredeck then is a different size porthole required elsewhere?


A smaller one may be required in the rear deck...not sure, but that probably wouldn't help drying much. Besides, I'm hoping I've convinced you that this question is moot!

Quote:
(3) I would go with the black due to better UV protection but the installation screws are nylon, wouldn't using stainless be better?


I, too, noticed that the black claims to have better UV protection, but I went with white on a white hull where I HAD TO DO AN INTERNAL REPAIR. It's held up nicely.

No matter how hard one tries, it's difficult to get a perfect ring/deck fit all the way around due to the varying contour. The ring must be well sealed with silicone, 5200, etc. Therefore the screws carry little load, do not need to be very tight, and nylon is more than adequate. Over tightening the screws will warp the ring, and the cover will not screw on properly.

There's a very good tech/DIY article on this procedure in the On The Wire achives at the beachcats.com. (But you don't need it, right, cause you're gonna use those funds on some sailing stuff you really need and spend that time sailing?)

Jerome Vaughan
Hobie 16
Clinton, Mi'sippi


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 9:10 am 
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Location: Pasadena Md
Thanks everyone for the replies!!!

Well rattle 'n hum, your argument is convincing and I will take your points into deep consideration. I do see though that Hobie itself sells those hatch cover kits. I guess at least for now I'll concentrate on "sea time". I'll further consider it when the weather cools. I have however replaced a few rotted floors in powerboats due to not enough ventilation and have always taken ventilation to the max given the cost of marine plywood and the work involved. For now I'll leave it alone. BUT if I decide to add ventilation in the future, skipper0802's installation looks really nice!
I can't say enough on the satisfaction I have with this boat. I really want to give it the best care I can.

Anyone else?

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1981 H16.
1993 Macgregor 26S
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 10:18 am 
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Location: USA
No soft spots? No ports

But...As long as there's humidity and sunshine a certain amount of water will be in the hulls, even if you haven't sailed her.

To prevent the future need for ports, due to the pronounced rocker of the 16 keel line, store the boat with the bows 5 foot above the ground.

Careful thought needed on how you accomplish this (tripod, ladder, ???) and how you keep the boat and trailer secured in the draining position without blowing over.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 6:04 pm 
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Location: Pasadena Md
No soft spots and yeah I have the trailer up on a saw horse the bows are at about 5 foot high... at least tonight, more sea trials tomorrow!! I'm so hooked 8) !

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 Post subject: port hole
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 9:35 am 
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Location: Sodus NY
I have seen a couple bows broken off right at the port hole. Now these were always the older boats with soft hulls but I still didn't want to put mine in there. I put mine behind the front pylons on a couple boats that I had. You never walk on them. They aren't as stressed as they would be in front where the bridle is trying to collpase the hulls inward. Placement should be just behind where the deck flattens out from the pylon. The foam block gets in the way and you get too close to the shoud if you go further back.

The hobie cat catalog ports are curved to fit the decks so it is worth getting them.

cheers
Bill


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:28 pm 
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Location: Atlanta, GA
NO PORT HOLES! Listen to everyone. Unless absolutely necessary! I live in hot Atlanta and with all the humidy and heat we have I never have a problem with my hulls drying out with just the drain plug! I do store mine with the front of the hulls up a bit, but not quite 5 feet. Best of luck :lol:

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