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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2009 10:43 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 12:53 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Charleston, S.C.
Remembering the amount of time I spent on the front crossbar, no way would I consider a Turbo rig. Just plain original old school is cool. :D

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Rick Whitehurst
H14 #2800
richardw@knology.net


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 3:35 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:34 pm
Posts: 16
Yes gnj or Glen, send some pics in of your H-14 turbo project. I am almost complete on my H-14turbo conversion using Hobie parts, but curious how you did it. Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 5:21 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:32 am
Posts: 15
Very Sorry! We dismantled the Hobie and placed it in the basement for the winter without getting any pics. It will be a long winter..... -glen


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:50 pm 
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Hi Rick and others on this forum. I enjoyed reading this thread about returning to H14 sailing and racing. I am a former Dutch (and UK Open) H14 Champion and multiple Top 3 in H14 Europeans and while it is all many moons ago (in 70's and 80's) I have very fond memories about The Hobie Cat 14.

I now live in Beijing, China but still have my fairly new H14 in storage in The Netherlands (I bought myself a new one a couple of years ago). But I cant wait to get it out of its stable and out at sea and in the surf again. Actually I am 'old school' so dislike 14's with a jib. However, the trapeze makes life easier on what used to be my six pack, and definitely improves the boat's performance. Rick you may have come the same conclusion already but a dolphin striker you definitely need, even without trapeze. We already installed home made dolphin strikers back in the seventies way before the jib and trapeze were invented. For vang - just use the one you are used to from back then - it is fine. And do use stiff rudder blades - a must for good upwind ability. And a new six batten sail. Rake the mast WAY back. Tighten all nuts and bolts and remove slack wherever you find it, also tighten your trampoline and before you know it even your old boat is in racing condition.

Because I happened to visit my home country The Netherlands in August of 2005? I participated in the 05 Europeans again - ending overall 5th and winning the dubious 'Master' Championship (for those over 40). If it hadn't been for a mast rotation problem in the last two races I may have ended up well in the the top 3 - anyway, it did wet my appetite for more racing! But what I wanted to say I am sold on the trapeze - I used it a lot during those races. True it is a deviation from the true old school - but it does make the 14 a more contemporary boat. But again, I would never go as far as sailing a 14 with a jib (though if it gives others pleasure I will be happy for them).

It is a real pity to slowly but very surely see the H14 disappear from the waters worldwide (with Hobie Cat USA not even producing or selling them anymore...) as many seem to think it is just a kid's or beginner's boat (not true as many of you would agree) with rotomolded boats probably a lot cheaper to produce. I would love to see fleets of 30-40 or so 14's back on the water for some serious racing - I would even probably give up kite surfing for that! And that says a lot. (Why hasn't Hobie Cat gone into kite surfing, btw?)

Lastly, if any of you know the whereabouts of John Dinsdale (formerly of Hobie Cat Europe) and have his email address for me, that would be greatly appreciated.

Anyway to all who read this - enjoy your time on your 14's and let's try to prevent the 14 from becoming extinct!
Rene Bos, Beijing, China, 9 January 2010


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:03 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:32 am
Posts: 15
Well.... we sail on a very small lake with normally very light & flakey winds and the addition of the jib makes a huge difference in speed, fun factor and ease of handling.


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 6:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2003 4:39 am
Posts: 92
The H14 is fairly easy to tack on a lake with only one person aboard. It's when you hit the beach and slam the boat through some 3-5ft swell that tacking gets to be a big PITA. I have stopped sailing my H14 not due to any flaw in its sailing capabilities, but mostly due to a lack of right ability. I'm certain my mast is leaking, I cannot right the boat by myself with the aid of a righting bag, and I weigh in at 180lbs. And I do know how to right catamarans-I have switched to the dark side and race a N20. At this point, I would consider sailing a H16 one up, simply because I find it easier to right than the H14.

Might sound strange, but the H16 and bigger boats are easier to right simply because you can stand on the hulls much easier when they are on the side.


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 4:34 am 
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Posts: 2
Like I mentioned in my previous post, I am pleased for anyone who finds sailing the H14 with a jib more pleasurable or satisfying! As long as we keep the 14 on the water!

In recent posts, I read about two common 'concerns' of the H14: that it is not easy to tack, and not easy to right once capsized. Let me try to deal with both topics. I hope I am still in the right thread for this.

Righting first. In a next post I will deal with tacking.

Righting (like tacking, btw) a H14 quickly and without difficulty requires implementation of some basic techniques and some practice. In the end it is technique and not weight that does the trick. Anyone within a reasonable weight range for sailing the 14 - say between 45 and 90 kilograms - can right a H14 in a matter of (two) minutes - regardless of the circumstances (wind, waves).
First of all, the boat should be in a seaworthy condition. That means among other things: the hulls should be drained (empty of water) before sailing, stays and trampoline snug. Rudders without play. The mast should not leak. If you suspect it leaks, test it. If it does, fix it. It is not difficult. No H14 mast should and needs to leak. Do not use a flotation device bungling at the top of your mast. It does not really help against going 'turtle' (180 degree capsize), but the added weight does make it a lot more difficult to right the boat. Also, a proper (length and thickness) righting line should be tied to the base of the mast at all times. Wearing gloves helps when sailing and certainly also when hanging on the righting line. Wearing rubber shoes prevents slipping off the hull but is not 'required'.
Okay, so assume you have just capsized. [Even if the boat goes turtle, no real worries - except when the mast top hits the bottom. But when you are quick enough, going turtle does not necessarily need to happen]. Anyway: climb on the hull (about in the middle) that is lying in the water. Move about slowly and carefully. Get to the mast base and throw the righting line up and over the hull up in the air. VERY important: make sure the traveller is free to slide all the way down; and that you have sheeted out entirely!! Unless you do this the sail will act as a bag holding water, making righting a lot more difficult, and the boat is then also more likely to race away from you or capsize again after righting! So, once you are standing on the lower hull, ready to pull your weight on the righting line that is dangling down, make sure that the bows of the boat point towards the wind (to do so, move your weight fore or aft along the hull and wait for the boat to position in the right direction). So that the wind comes from the front, blowing under the length of the mast, pushing up the sail from underneath, helping you to right in a jiffy. If the boat is thus positioned properly vis a vis the wind, and fully sheeted out, you normally only need to hang on the righting line for a brief moment, and up she comes. If there are any waves/swell, make use of that too: start hanging the moment the top of the swell passes under the mast top. The moment the boat rights and is at about a 45 degree angle, bend your knees and start hanging on the dolphin striker (or, lacking one, the lacing of the trampoline) and hold firm. This avoids the boat from either accelerating away from you, or worse, capsizing again (usually to the other side). Once you have stabilized and pacified the boat, climb back on, haul the righting line in, take a deep breath or two and you are ready to go again! Righting a H14 is normally really very doable. It is recommended to practice it first under controlled circumstances - in other words, try it out a couple of times under safe circumstances and conditions if you are not sure how to do it. Then later, when a moment comes the boat does unintentionally (nose dive and) capsize, and you need to get it back on its paws really quickly (like when you are racing, or near a rocky shore) you will be ready and confident to deal with it. Happy H14 sailing!


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 8:36 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:32 am
Posts: 15
We too have had some "difficulties" (understatement) in righting the 14. What we found is just the slightest amount of assistance in lifting the end of the mast up out of the water with a helper makes all the difference. Will invest in a proper righting line this spring and give it another try...


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 1:35 am
Posts: 26
Location: Australia, Queensland
i actually havnt capsized my hobie 14t yet..
i am sorta scared to cause i have heard that they dont like to come back up..
thats why i have been taking it easy..

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My H14t

currently being sanded back and repainted..


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 6:52 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 7:28 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Washington, DC
For those concerned about righting, you should consider adding a mast float. The two H14s at my local club are rigged up with mast floats (Hobie Bob, I think, the smaller version), as are all the H16s. These are obviously not class-legal for racing. But they provide tremendous peace of mind, especially as we sail in the open ocean and the safety boat often has trouble spotting capsized boats when there are waves.

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-Roland
Sailing vintage Hobie Cats in West Africa.


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 Post subject: Re: Returning H14 Racer
PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2009 1:25 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Woodstock ONT. CANADA
Well last season was my first on a catamaran, and the first day out sailing I promptly pitchpoled it, and the resulting capsize. I found it amazing how well the trampoline works as a water slide when pitchpoling!!! Because I sail on a resevoir, all the cats at our club have the floats on the masts so they don't get stuck in the bottom if you turtle. (yes even the non- hobies have them) We learned about masts stuck to the bottom the hard way. As far as righting it, I weight about 185 pounds, and found it fairly straightforeward. The most difficult part was to get the boat pointed in the right direction, and not to be sailing using the trampoline for a sail. I eventually found that when standing on the hull (in the water) if you move towards the back of the boat, it creates weather helm. So as the boat turns towards the wind, you will get to the point where it is quite easy to right. Let me also add that I'm 48 years old, and have a job that requires alot of sitting, so not in the best of shape. Hope this will help some of you to not be fearful of capsizing, or give you some other ways to approach it WES


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