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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2003 1:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2003 4:39 am
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What Should I get? I weigh 155 lbs and am 5' 4". Last time I flipped, I couldn't right my H14 standard, the rescue squad had to come in there power boat and right it for me ! I was thinking an easy right (stretch) or the Hobie Righting Bag!


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 Post subject: Which?
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2003 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Probably both. The bag is the extra weight you need. The snap back line systems just make it easier to get the line out and hold on.

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Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2003 6:09 am 
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Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 2:48 pm
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Location: Maryland/Outer Banks, N.C.
I think that with practice, you should be able to solo right a 14. Somewhere, I saw that it only requires 140 lbs. to right a 14. Make sure that the mast is pointed generally in the direction from which thi wind is coming. Make sure that your righting line is over, not under the up or windward hull, this'll give you more leverage. I'm 5-9 and 165 and have no problem righting my turbo by myself- my 16's a problem though! I use a hawiian- style( under tramp) system on my 14 and a snap-back ( bungee) on my 16. I kind of prefer the hawiian style because the bungee gets underfoot when trapping out.
Dave


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2003 1:31 pm 
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This past weekend, me and the person I bought the boat from tried did a capsize drill together. Can't remember the name of the book right now, but it says a strong 140 lbs person can right it, but the average 150 lbs can do it. Now , I swam the mast around into the wind, had the line over the hull (like before aswell) and tried to right it. wouldn't hardly budge, tip of the mast still in the water, wouldn't come clear so no help from wind. Now, my friend tried it by himself aswell, weighs aprox. 170lbs, couldn't do it by himself ethier. both got on, came right over. He also owns a prindle 16, which we did a drill on the day before. The two of us easily righted the boat! Didn't try it by ourselves, but it isn't designed to be sailed by yourself! what is wrong with this pricture? I think I am going to just get a bag, the "righting system" is just their to make getting the rope easier.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2003 6:16 pm 
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Location: Maryland/Outer Banks, N.C.
Have you checked your mast to make sure that it doesn't take on water? Mine leaked at one time, and that small ammount of water makes the mast awfully heavy!- Dave


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2003 6:43 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2003 6:13 pm
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Location: pensacola, FL
i just use a 10 ft galvanived fence pole with a pad on one end and two ropes on the other. i put the pad side on the lip of the bottom hull and tie the two ropes to each airborn hull pylon so the pole hangs at 45 degrees. i then just hang out on the end and the boat rights itself with just my 140 lbs and no pulling. ive tested it out in no wind at all and it works like a charm. i have thought about how it might stress the lip to much but i have not seen or felt any effects in the fiberglass.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2004 4:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:58 pm
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Location: Toronto ON
turbofan mentioned 'does the mast take on water' What is the best way to check it, and second how do you reseal it? (if possible)


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 8:52 am 
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Location: Jamestown, RI
I had a mast that took on water, made it impossib le to right the boat alone. Actually had america's cup champion Alinghi's shase boat pull me over one time. after I got in to shore, I unstepped the mast, and it was incredibly heavy. I could actually hear the water sloshing around inside. Mine was leaking around the rivets in the top, and the water came out the same way. I got a new mast, because mine was bent anyway, but if you drill out the old rivets, and install new ones dipped in some good marine grade sealant, that should do the trick. I would recommend putting sealant around any potential openings in the mast.

Marcus
H14
Narragansett Bay, RI


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 4:38 pm 
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Location: Maryland/Outer Banks, N.C.
To check my masts for leaks-I usually just wait for a calm day, push them underwater and look for bubbles. If it leaks around the casting, you've got to remove the casting, clean everything up, and reinstall using gobs of silicone. Hope this helps!- Dave


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 8:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:58 pm
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Location: Toronto ON
Thanks for the tip.

Was mentioned under another heading about other mast floation devices... Is the Baby Bob worth the money? Or is there another way? (Maybe something a little classier than a 2L pop bottles tied on with string)

Note: I just picked up a Turbo and haven't sailed in 12 years. Off my beach its gets pretty windy and potential rescue boats are very few and far between. A little paranoid about turtling...


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2004 8:12 am 
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Location: San Francisco Bay Area
I had a Wave (just under 14'), and the standard "Bob" on that produced more than enough buoyancy to keep the mast rigidly afloat. I don't know how the displacement volumes compare between that and the "Baby Bob", or the mast weights/lengths, but if you're not against the "lollipop look", I'd highly recommend it. I find it very comforting to know that it's there. I'm even considering putting custom vinyl decal graphics on mine.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2004 12:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 8:55 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Saint Albans Bay, Vermont
I have a Baby Bob on my Getaway and it works great! If you get one make sure you locktite the screws holding it to the mast or they will come out. I lost 2 of them and the other 2 were loose!

I too put some graphics on my Bob. I put a big U.S.A. on both sides with some stars. Looks sharp! :)


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