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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 2:40 pm 
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Hello Hobie Cat's,

I have finally gotten around to setting up the Hobie 14T I picked up a couple of weeks ago and have some questions.

Below is a close up of the stepped mast.
Does this look correct to you?
It's just that it doesn't look seated correctly to me. I don't have a H14 to compare with but I do own a H16 and the mast sits a great deal lower in the mast base so this raised an eye brow.
Image

Here is the H14T set up, its was a zero wind day to day were I sail.
The boom appears to sit higher than compared to the H16, I confess I did not connect the main sheet block but did apply downhaul.
Does this look normal for the H14?
Image

And for comparison the H16, notice the boom appears to sit lower on the mast!
Image

And finally I have an image of the broken mast base, I purchased the H14 / H16 stepper kit from Hobie Center UK, this week, followed the instructions to the detail i.e. measuring out the drill hole as precisely as possible and drilling what appeared a nye on perfect hole only for it to snap of the rear curved area of the mast base when raising! This certainly should not have happened so none to pleased about it! Think I will contact the Hobie Center about this.
The first time I raised it the mast raised with the stepper kit but I was unable to release the pins they where stuck solid.
The second attempt at raising snapped the back of the mast base.
The busted shackle loop (broken rivet) is another thing I need to tackle tomorrow.

Image

Your thoughts are much appreciated!
SRG

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 8:40 pm 
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The mast looks a little high in the base. Do you have a stock Teflon chip in the base? I would start there.

As far as the stepping pin goes, mast rake will affect how difficult it is to remove the pins. You may have to keep the rig a little loose and rock the mast fore/aft as you work the pins out. I've had to pound mine out a few times when I had too much rake and too tight of a rig. A better way is to walk the rig loose and remove them properly.

As far as the boom height, does your mast have a black band sticker? When I crank the downhaul, the gooseneck sits at or slightly below the black band.


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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 6:29 am 
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The mast definitely looks a little tall in the base! That's probably what caused the stops to round off so much. Not sure exactly how the retrofit turbo dolphin striker works, but check the step and make sure that the base is able to fit completely down.

I have an '82 factory turbo, and with the newer step links the pins tend to bind when the mast is stepped, no matter how loose the rig as well as interfering with mast rotation with the mast raked back. What I do is use a pair of 3/16 pins rather than the 1/4 they provide. Makes for a bit of slop raising the mast, but the pins remove fairly easily. I take the link off while the mast is raised. Judging from some of my acquaintance's boats, newer bases and steps function better with the new links-don't really know what if any difference there is, though.

To achieve rake, I set the furler up similar to an 18's using a 10 hole plate. I notice, though that your boat doesn't appear to have a furler- the only boats I've seen set up like that had a kind of 18/16 like set up with a custom jib. Does yours use the wire in the jib luff as the forestay?

The boom does look much higher than mine- I downhaul to at or near the black band and use a lot of rake.

Dave


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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 7:45 am 
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I sometimes use a small phillips head screwdriver in place of the step pin. Its easier to pull out with a handle on it. In a pinch (no step link) I've stepped masts using a bungie or shock cord tied from the downhaul cleat to the dolphin striker. You basically want to create enough down force at the mast base to avoid it kicking up into your face. Obviously you need two people for this. One to lift and the other to guide the base into the step. You probably don't want to attempt this with your kid.


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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 4:37 am 
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Thanks for your replies Folks.

The H14 is non standard and appears to have been fitted with a H16 type Jib setup.
It employs a forestay and a wired luff in the Jib that takes up tension while loosening the forestay much the same as the H16 jib setup.
I guess there are benefits and draw backs to both setups. In my case I keep the mast raised at the sailing club I belong too so the H16 type setup is probably more favorable.

So, I am in the market for a new mast base since the one I have is broken.
I actually have a spare split type H14 mast with a mast base so I could potentially use this at a push, looking on ebay the H14 base seem quiet hard to find and Hobie UK don't list them though if they did I suspect it would cost around 50-60 UKP. Shipping from the US is extortionate, for instance I was looking at purchasing the mast step kit from the US for like 12ukp but the shipping cost was 25ukp !!!!

The other option I was thinking about was to take an impression of the original mast step in green sand and cast a new in aluminum since I already have the setup in my home shop. It would be an interesting and rewarding exercise if anything else :-)

I like the screwdriver idea as mentioned having a handle would certainly help a great deal.

So, I took the H14 out yesterday for its maiden voyage with me and my first ever solo (haven't solo'd the H16 yet)!
The winds were light @ around 5-6 knots with intermittent gusts but I did manage to fly a hull briefly albeit an inch or two off of the water. Wow really enjoyed sailing her and she did not sink! The mast stayed up! :-)

Will further investigate the mast seating and report back on findings.

Thanks again Chaps!
SRG

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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 12:48 pm 
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Got to thinking, would JB Weld work hold up for fixing the mast base?

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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 4:51 am 
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paragon1970 wrote:
Got to thinking, would JB Weld work hold up for fixing the mast base?

No.

I've never seen a mast base break like that - especially on a 14's mast that's so light, the original way to step the mast didn't involve a link or even a hook. You raised the mast by sticking the base in the sand ahead of the front crossbar, then lifted the mast vertically to put it in the step.


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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 1:14 pm 
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Hi MBounds,

I have read and seen pictures if stepping the mast in the way you describe, I'm a little reluctant in attempting the straight lift method though as have a feeling it would go embarrassingly wrong for me! ;-)

Got to the boat today and had some JB-Weld so thought heck got nothing to loose.
If it fails as it likely will do I think I will try one more method and that is milling out a piece of Ali to fit the luff groove right at the base, above were the broken mast base hook is then attempt to rivet it in place so it creates a larger surface area to attach / stick the broken mast base piece too, could also potentially attempt to throw in a couple of rivets either side of the hook to mate the pieces tighter with JB-Weld spread across the top to assist.

Seen a video of this stuff holding up a VW Beatle! Most likely a load of hype though!
The alternative is buy a new mast base or cast one a fresh in my little home-built propane furnace. We see, will test it next week when I return to the club.

Thanks,
SRG

Picture of JD-Welded mast hook:
Image

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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 5:03 pm 
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MBounds wrote:
paragon1970 wrote:
Got to thinking, would JB Weld work hold up for fixing the mast base?

I've never seen a mast base break like that - especially on a 14's mast that's so light, the original way to step the mast didn't involve a link or even a hook. You raised the mast by sticking the base in the sand ahead of the front crossbar, then lifted the mast vertically to put it in the step.

It looks like a non-standard base as the Hobie part has much less material in the part where the pin passes thru the hole. It's easy to over-stress it if you lose control of the mast when lowering it.

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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 6:15 pm 
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It's a Hobie mast base (nobody else makes them), but it's an old one - late '60s / early '70s.


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PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2014 3:08 am 
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Damn, so it could be older than yours truly, 44 this year!
I am not entirely sure on the age of the boat maybe 1972 - 79.
The boat has a silver mast, boom and silver front and rear beams.
Things where built to last back then.
In-fact the boat is probably in better shape then I am! LOL

Could the age and older design of this mast base be the reason it appears to sit higher in the mast step?

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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 4:53 am 
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I had a similar issue with mast angle, seems we both have pre 82 castings that weren't designed for much mast angle. I reworked mine to work. If I recall correctly I could buy a current step for aus$100 that allows for tilt while still making use of the stops. :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 5:52 pm 
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How's the J-B weld holding? Properly prepped, that is some STRONG stuff! Just curious- that part of the base should only be stressed in raising/lowering the mast so I'm thinking it might work.

Dave


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:30 pm 
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Sorry for the delay in replying.
I have not had the chance to test the JB-Weld strength as yet but as soon as I do I will be sure to let you know.

-SRG

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