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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:13 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:59 am
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I recently purchased a 1989 Holder 14 to replace a Vagabond that I had years ago. After getting the boat home, I noticed about 3-5 gallons of water in the hull that needed to be drained. The hull is in excellent condition for a boat of this age and I can't find any gaping cracks/holes where the water may be getting inside. Is this normal? Are there common areas for leaks to appear in this design?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 4:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 2618
Location: Jersey Shore
Very rare to find any sailboat hull that is perfectly watertight. If the plug has not been pulled in a while, it would be possible for the hull to collect water over time, even if the boat were being stored on a trailer. I would take the boat out and sail it and see how much water has collected after a day in moderate conditions. If it's a half gallon or less, than probably not much to worry about. If it's more than about a half gallon, then do a soapy water/pressure test. Lightly pressurize the hull, spray all fittings and deck seams with soapy water and inspect for bubbles. Bubbles = leaks.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:04 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 6:10 am
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Location: Plum Island, MA
Before heading out first take a look around and caulk any area that looks like it could be a place water would get in. Pressurizing isn't so simple. The former is easy; on my 16 I found it fixed the problem.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 7:44 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
hogwldfltr wrote:
Pressurizing isn't so simple.


Pressuring is actually quite easy. Use a piece of rubber hose about 6" long and small enough to fit in the drain plug. Wrap the end with duct tape or electrical tape so that the hose fits snugly into the drain opening (you can actually thread it in). Put your mouth on the hose and blow in with a dozen or so good breaths. If you have a second person, put your finger over the hose while the other person goes around the boat with a spray bottle of soapy water spraying for leaks. Top off the pressure as necessary. If you're working by yourself, use a pair of vice grips to pinch off the hose and then go around and spray the boat. I have done this several times and it is very simple.

It is much better to actually find the source of the leak than to go around randomly squirting caulk into various places.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 10:08 am 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
You don't need to seal the hose to the drain hole to put the needed pressure inside. Actually... sealing it can cause you to over-pressurize.

I just hang the shop vac's exhaust hose directed at the hole opening. It increases the internal pressure plenty to get soapy bubbles at any leak points.

I used a rod or screw driver inserted into the drain hole to hang the vac hose on. Works well if you support the hose with some tape or something.

Leak Check FAQ: http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=169

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Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:06 pm 
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Location: Jersey Shore
mmiller wrote:
You don't need to seal the hose to the drain hole to put the needed pressure inside. Actually... sealing it can cause you to over-pressurize.

I just hang the shop vac's exhaust hose directed at the hole opening. It increases the internal pressure plenty to get soapy bubbles at any leak points.


I agree that the hose does not need to be sealed to the plug opening if you're going to use a shop vac. But you can also just blow into a hose with your lungs and develop enough pressure to get the leaks to produce bubbles. In this case, you will want to seal the hose to the hull, otherwise you will probably pass out from trying to keep the hull pressurized.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:35 pm
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Location: Tuscaloosa, AL
srm wrote:
mmiller wrote:
You don't need to seal the hose to the drain hole to put the needed pressure inside. Actually... sealing it can cause you to over-pressurize.

I just hang the shop vac's exhaust hose directed at the hole opening. It increases the internal pressure plenty to get soapy bubbles at any leak points.


I agree that the hose does not need to be sealed to the plug opening if you're going to use a shop vac. But you can also just blow into a hose with your lungs and develop enough pressure to get the leaks to produce bubbles. In this case, you will want to seal the hose to the hull, otherwise you will probably pass out from trying to keep the hull pressurized.

sm



Some people are full of hot air!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No Effect :lol:


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