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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:06 pm 
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All of the links say to drill holes,use epoxy or grit rot, some have good results, some have not so good. Here is what I am going to try: cut hole for inspection port further up on hull, scoop, dig, scrape, drill, use my pressure washer to remove as much of the foam as I can, let completely dry out. Prop boat up on bow, then pour the marine 2 part expanding foam where the old foam was. Level boat then fill the remaining area where the foam was. Not the entire hull. This stuff flows & expands into crevices, dries VERY hard, & the expanding pressure is not enough to distort the hull. What do you think ?


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 Post subject: Expanding foam?
PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 9:59 am 
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Expanding foam? To replace the foam sandwiched between glass?

Don't think so. The construction is foam sandwiched between layers of fiberglass. You cannot "scoop" it out. Expanding foam would force the layers of glass apart and damage the structure.

Filling the inside of the hull is different from that. Solid filled hulls will be heavier... 2-3 pounds per square foot.

You may be able to fill and get some of the needed structure from a solid filled bow. It will be heavier.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 11:05 am 
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Remember, expanding foam looks for the "least path of resistance" when expanding. Mix up some in a plastic cup, it does not split the cup, it comes out the top. The foam is deteroiated from the top or cap anyway, that is why its soft.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:34 am 
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Path of least resistance? That would be why it will not work for repairing delaminations. You need a penetrating resin to get back into the tight crevices between the layers of glass and foam without expanding between them.

The delamination can be anywhere between the layers. At the glass to foam laminations or in the foam itself. That is why we drill down through the foam and stop at the inner layer of glass. This pierces all possible layers where the delamination may be.

Use the delamination repair method as described in the FAQ section of our forums here. It works and is easiest to do.

Image

http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=1156

Here is an old cut up Hobie 14 that shows a delamination in the upper edge of the shot.

Image

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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 2:58 pm 
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Thanks for info, there is a topic where a person used Gorilla Glue & it worked great, the slow drying time gave it time to soak or wick into the material, then the expanding filled the voids, then it all was "glued" together. I guess the main thing is not to put too much for room to expand. I also saw a where on another cat website a person who used "great stuff" to repair his, & it was rock hard. People are afraid to try anything else. Epoxy is OK, whay use epoxy ? it is fiberglass, why not use resin ?


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 Post subject: Epoxy or Resin?
PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 9:15 am 
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Epoxy or Resin?

Epoxy is a resin. The two resins we talk about are Epoxy and Polyesther. The boat is made from polyesther resin.

My rule of thumb is that Epoxy is stronger. Polyesther is easier to work with (safer in production). You can repair a polyesther boat with Epoxy, but you have to use Epoxy on an epoxy boat or previous epoxy repair. Polyesther will not properly cure over Epoxy.

There are all kinds of ideas out there. I recommend the Git-Rot epoxy injection method as I have done it and seen the repair (Hobie 16 deck delamination) hold over 2 decades.

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Hobie Cat USA


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