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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 7:25 pm 
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
I just replaced the wornout Mast Step on my H16 following Matt Miller's "Getting in Step" article (listed above in this forum).

The old mast step was fused to the dolphin striker post due to saltwater corrosion over 30 years. I had to cut the old mast step casting into 3 pieces inorder to free it from the post. To get the new mast step casting to line up with the top of the crossbar (old style without integrated track) and with the dolphin striker post I had to do some filing to get it to fit. The threaded hole for the post in the new mast step casting was about 1/4" aft of the top of the post. I had to slightly enlarge the aft side of the upper striker post hole in the crossbar (as Matt recommended). I also filed down some of the aft edge of the crossbar (where the casting "hooks" over it) and slightly filed down the inside of the lip of the casting where it "hooks" over the the crossbar.

Loosening the nuts on the dolphin striker bar was also interesting. One of the nuts broke off, fortunately there was enough thread left on the bar that I could put a new nut on it. The other end's nut came off fine.

After filing and using clamps, the new casting now fit nicely on the crossbar. I couldn't figure out how to drill exactly through the new casting into the old rivet holes of the crossbar so I drilled fresh holes and riveted.

With the old mast step fused to the dolphin striker post, there was no play at the bottom of the post so I used to pull on the dolphin striker bar (near the post) to pull my boat around the beach or when pulling it up on top of the trailer. Since there are not many threads in the new mast step base in contact with the top of the dolphin striker post and the lower striker post hole in the crossbar is not snug on the post, there is now about a 1/4" of play forward/aft in the bottom of the post.

My question: Is it still OK to pull the boat around by pulling on the dolphin striker bar or is this not an accepted practice? Also, if it is normal practice, is there normally any play forward/aft in the bottom of post in new boats? If not, then has anyone used any type of shims or partial sleeves around the post where it goes thru the crossbar's lower striker post hole to make it more rigid?

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Tim
82' H16
Sail # 88863
Panama City Beach, FL
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:50 am 
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Tim H16 wrote:
My question: Is it still OK to pull the boat around by pulling on the dolphin striker bar or is this not an accepted practice? Also, if it is normal practice, is there normally any play forward/aft in the bottom of post in new boats? If not, then has anyone used any type of shims or partial sleeves around the post where it goes thru the crossbar's lower striker post hole to make it more rigid?


Best not to pull on the bottom of the post. If you do or use a winch line. Keep it high up on the post.

I grab a hull lip and striker rod close to the hull.

There is no play in the post on a new boat. Shims might help.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:32 am 
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Since I have to trailer my boat and usually sail solo a couple of times a week, it never seemed like a potential problem to use both of my hands on the dolphin striker rod (on both sides of the dolphin striker post) to move the boat around with the original mast step fused to the dolphin striker post.

The sandy beach where I launch my boat is such that I back my AWD SUV and trailer within a few feet of the water's edge (since I do not want to put the galvanized trailer in the saltwater on a regular basis). To put the boat (with the mast up) back on the trailer, I put the trailer close enough to the water's edge so that I can grab the dolphin striker rod with two hands and manually lift and pull the boat's bows up onto the rear rollers of the trailer. Then I stand on the back of the trailer's frame and continue manually pulling with both hands on the dolphin striker rod (not the post) until the hulls are at their maximum angle. At this point I can open the drain plugs to remove any water in the hulls. Next I stand on the trailer's frame and continue pulling forward on the rod with both hands until the center of gravity of the boat is forward enough to allow the bows of the hulls to gradually lower down onto the trailer's front rollers.

If it is not a good idea to move the boat around manually by using two hands on the dolphin striker rod, I am not sure what else I can grab on the boat to lift and pull it up onto a trailer.

What other methods do people use to get their boats onto their trailers?

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Tim
82' H16
Sail # 88863
Panama City Beach, FL
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:12 pm 
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Location: Detroit, MI
Tim H16 wrote:
What other methods do people use to get their boats onto their trailers?
On my boat, I roll it up behind the trailer on the beach wheels until the hulls are on the aft trailer rollers. The boat is supported by the transoms, the axle on the wheels and the aft rollers. If the surface is especially coarse (anything other than sand), I use pads under the transoms.

Then untie the wheels and from behind, lift the rear crossbar (use a power lift stance, with the crossbar in the crook of your arms and lifting with your legs). Then walk the boat forward until it rocks down on the forward rollers.

A couple of notes:
My boat is minimum weight (320 lbs) and it doesn't leak significantly. If your boat leaks, fix it.

My boat also has the Hobie 20 style tiller connectors, so I can remove the tiller crossbar in about 10 seconds to get it out of the way to do the "power lift" on the back end. You can do it with the tiller crossbar in place, but it's awkward. Much easier to do with 2 people, since you can lift from the transoms.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 7:50 pm 
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Matt,

I used to power lift mine onto the trailer, but without the beach wheels or removing the tiller crossbar. The problem I had with this method is that the tramp blocked my view of the front rollers on the trailer and it made it hard to make sure that I didn't scratch the paint on my hulls by not landing properly on the front rollers.

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Tim
82' H16
Sail # 88863
Panama City Beach, FL
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:26 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:28 pm
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Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
Can anyone point me to the Hotline Article on Hobie 16 Mast step replacement or some other source with a good description of the process? The links in Matt Miller's original post [http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=7079] are broken.

This looks like a tricky job and I don't want to screw it up. :D


UPDATE - Found the article- http://static.hobiecat.com/2010_archive ... _02-05.pdf

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94' H16 - 114050
www.HobieFleet97.org
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