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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 10:47 pm 
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Location: Okinawa
Hi

have just received replacement delrin screws (from a Hobie dealer in UK) and they appear to have more threads per inch or however you'd phrase that. My boat is an early 80s H14. Has the thread pitch changed at all over the years?

edited to add
Just had a thought - seeing as my new parts came from the UK (I live in Japan but have family there) Could it be that European made Hobies use a different thread pitch from US made Hobies, which presumably mine is?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 7:57 am 
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If your boat is U.S. built, ( could be verified by serial numbers, etched in the fiberglass at the top of each hull, at/just below the rear lip of the transoms above the rudder mounts) it could be that they are U.S. standard threads.
Where as, the ones you bought as replacements are from U.K./Europe are a metric thread.
Matt Miller would possibly know that.

Posting your hull serial numbers could help him on that.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:48 pm 
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Location: Okinawa
Unable to check hull numbers right now - it's at the beach though I have looked previously, several repaints have hidden them but next time I go out I'll dig a little deeper...for now I will just go ahead and order new screws from a US supplier I guess. The ones from the UK were white and the ones I see on Murrays are black if that's anything to go on.


http://hobiespares.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&path=20_64_94&product_id=94

http://www.murrays.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MS&Product_Code=50-60450000&Category_Code=C-HF

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:58 am 
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If you know the year of the boat/built that might help, talk to technical service before you order.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 12:21 pm 
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Location: Oceanside, California
If the boat is in Japan... most likely US standard. The US Delrin screw is 3/4-10

Contact a supplier though our distributor in Australia... hobiecat.com.au

They list: The Salty Dog

Address:14-4 Sakanosh_ita
Kamakura-Shi, Kanagawa, Japan
Phone:+81 467 25 0633 Fax:+81 467 25 0633

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 8:32 pm 
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Location: Sechelt, BC, Canada... Sunshine Coast
Just a thought before u install... when u get the correct size screw.. wrap the threads in plumbers teflon tape before you install... it stops them from fusing themselves to the aluminum housing.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 10:23 pm 
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Location: Okinawa
Thanks for the replies everyone.

I compared the thread of the old screw (what was left of it anyway after I drilled it) and it is identical to a standard 3/4-10 steel bolt I found here. I spoke to the supplier here in japan (Salty Dog) and they are out of stock so I'll have to order from Murrays anyway. Lesson learnt for future anyway...

Any good suggestions on how to get out there until my parts arrive? (probably couple of weeks) I was thinking either lashing the rudders down) risky with all the coral heads around here) or McGyvering a temporary screw from the 3/4-10 bolt I found here, taking it out after each sail? Bad idea? The bolt could chew the threads if things aren't perfect?

Golden week holidays coming up here next week, temps up in the high 70s...you know how it is!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 6:29 am 
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Waiting is the wisest, but if you simply must, I would not lash your rudders down if coral heads are a given hazard. That said, if you can come up with a suitable temporary replacement with proper threads, when installed, will not interfer with anything it comes in contact with, works as good substitute until the right part comes in.
I would first make sure that the threads in your castings are completely cleaned out. Then I would make sure that the part you improvise with can be install and removed very easily, working it back and forth/removing it/reinstalling,making sure your not stripping in any way,re clean out your casting(s) and last I would keep the tension on your cam(s) to a minimuim. Remove after each use since you are operating in salt water. If it comes out to easily, remember you may be now replacing a spring and plunger.
If you can accomplish all that, heck, keep it around as a go to emergency part, or buy an extra part for down the road.

The best, is just wait it out, if you can not do all of the above. Improvising is a good thing, but it to, has its limitations. Patience has its benefits.
Nice looking boat you have by the way.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 6:59 am 
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Location: Lake Norman NC
when I replace the plastic screws i use a SS bolt to clean the threads and i use teflon tape and silicone greese on the new plastic screw.Try turning back and forth each spring and relube if necessary
Former Hobie Admiral Gary


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 6:40 pm 
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Josefk wrote:
I spoke to the supplier here in japan (Salty Dog) and they are out of stock so I'll have to order from Murrays anyway.


Try to support your local dealer. Salty Dog orders stock from Australia several times per month. Murrays is not a Hobie dealer, so there can be delays while they source parts from an Authorized dealer to re-sell.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 9:00 am 
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Location: Okinawa
Thanks M in Mi...looks a lot better from a distance!

So I cleaned out the castings good and proper. Tidied up the threads with the 3/4 SS bolt I have and then cut it down and put a slot in the top of it and it's working just fine. Threads actually seem in great condition thankfully. I'll use teflon tape and grease as advised and remove it after each sail - good for the next couple of weeks till my parts get here. Matt I went back to Salty Dog - I've ordered from him before and he has been v helpful in the past. guess I can wait a few weeks now I'm good with a temp fix.

everything is more complicated being out here - wish there were more Hobies here - and sailors in general, it's a great place to sail but the locals don't seem to get it preferring to put put around the edges of the outer reef in their fishing dinghies.

Thanks again everyone.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 10:13 am 
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Quote:
Thanks M in Mi...looks a lot better from a distance


Hey, function is more important than looks, up close. If it looks good from the road, close enough.

Quote:
remove it after each sail


Just because, salt is corrosive, and does funny things to aluminum and steel, does not take very long. (not stainless)

Quote:
everything is more complicated being out here - wish there were more Hobies here - and sailors in general, it's a great place to sail but the locals don't seem to get it preferring to put put around the edges of the outer reef in their fishing dinghies.

Taking a local out for a spin, now and then, can make a difference in the long run, I try to do that, It took a while, but eventially, a local bought a used H-16 boat this year. Some one who sailed mono hulls years ago. Even if its someone who most likely may not buy a boat later, people do talk about it after having the experience. You just never know. Planting seeds can grow crops.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:00 am 
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Location: West Michigan (Grand Rapids, Holland Area)
I used stainless steel set screws with anti-seize lubricant. BUT I only sail on fresh water. Stainless and aluminum can corrode together via galvanic corrosion and a catalyst for that is salt, so just a heads up to be aware of those things.

Just an idea, maybe you could tighten all of the pivoting hardware to make the rudders difficult to move up and down, assuming that you don't have to kick the rudders up often it may work for the few times that you want to go out while you wait for your parts. Then if you hit a coral they would still kick up.

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