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 Post subject: Problems coming about
PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:39 pm 
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In high winds, I can't get the Getaway to come about. I put the jib all the way out, put all of the weight on the back of the boat upwind, and can't quite catch the wind - - so I always have to jibe which I don't like to do.

Any suggestions? Is my mast too straight up? It shouldn't be this hard...

Thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 8:47 am 
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Jib "all the way out"?

Tacking in higher winds or any wind requires speed to move through the tack. You have to be able to get some speed up. You also need to be sailing close to the wind... not a reach. Turn the rudder slowly at first and more and the boat slows. Hike out and trim harder as you enter the tack. Keep the sheet tight till the boat gets head-to-wind. Release the main sail, but keep the jib sheeted. Let the jib backwind the bows across the wind. Allow the main sail to sheet out several feet so the boat does not weathervane back into the wind. Keep track of forward momentum, reverse the rudders if the boat begins to back down.

In any case get the bows well across onto the new tack before releasing the jib. Re-sheet the jib first and then the main. Ease the main in to get some forward speed and steerage before sheeting the main tighter.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:56 am 
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mmiller wrote:

Tacking in higher winds or any wind requires speed to move through the tack. You have to be able to get some speed up. You also need to be sailing close to the wind... not a reach. Turn the rudder slowly at first and more and the boat slows. Hike out and trim harder as you enter the tack. Keep the sheet tight till the boat gets head-to-wind. Release the main sail, but keep the jib sheeted. Let the jib backwind the bows across the wind. Allow the main sail to sheet out several feet so the boat does not weathervane back into the wind. Keep track of forward momentum, reverse the rudders if the boat begins to back down.

In any case get the bows well across onto the new tack before releasing the jib. Re-sheet the jib first and then the main. Ease the main in to get some forward speed and steerage before sheeting the main tighter.


I had the same problem, and I did everything Matt said except for 1 thing : pushing the main SEVERAL FEETS. Tacking was a nightmare, when facing high wind and waves.
After I started to pushing the main (again SEVERAL FEETS), tacking became very easy, to the point where it is now a lot of fun to tack.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:27 am 
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Crobiecat - I'm not sure that I understand what you mean by pushing out the main by several feets. There isn't a boom on the Getaway. How do I do that? Thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:41 am 
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You can sheet out many feet or manually push the sail to force the sheet out. On a boat with a boom (Which I took the text from) I push the boom up / out with my back as I crawl under during the tack.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:30 pm 
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If you are having trouble visualizing this. Pick up a copy of Catamaran Sailing A Step by Step Guide. My wife could not understand what I was talking about. After watching the DVD for 10 minutes or so, she picked it right up. I was trying to sail my Getaway like I had sail monohull dinghies in the past. Now that I back wind the jib and sheet out the main, tacking is really pretty easy. I'd go so far as to say that it is one of the many strengths of the Getaway.
No worries
Paul


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:07 pm 
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First of all, I want to say thanks for the very helpful replies. Now I just need a windy day to try this. One more question: If I have the mast "too vertical", will that make it harder to come about? Any guidance on how to set the mast?

Thanks again


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:45 pm 
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A vertical mast will make it harder to point higher... makes it harder to have speed close hauled as you enter the tack, but not that much. If a concern... raking the mast aft is easy and will help over-all performance.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:55 pm 
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Matt,

regarding the main cleat holes, when would you use the external one ?
I use the internal hole to de-power.
I understand I can use the external one in low wind, to get a fuller sail.

Overall I use the middle one, as I feel the boat behaves better that way.
But if I want more power in high wind, say 20+ knots, would using the external hole help go faster ? or would it hurt and I should need a flatter sail ?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 3:11 pm 
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At 20 kts... flatter would be better.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 4:34 pm 
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mmiller wrote:
At 20 kts... flatter would be better.


Yes, flatter is better, but in this case it also means smaller, doesn't it ?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 4:36 pm 
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Smaller? I don't understand.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 4:51 pm 
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May be I misread the documentation, but my understanding is that the when you use the inside hole on the main clew plate, not only you get more outhaul and flatten the sail, but you also reduce the sail plan.
Did I misunderstand how it works ?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:20 pm 
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There is no ruduction in sail area when using the forward main block attachment point. This simply pulls the sail flatter as you sheet hard.

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