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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 8:41 pm 
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Hi, I was out sailing yesterday and my mast broke. The comp-tip broke straight off. The wind was around 10 knots when this happened - nothing crazy or extreme. My getaway is a 2002 model that I bought new. It has always been in covered storage when not in use.

So, I have several questions that I'm hoping someone can answer:

1. Has this happened to anyone else? I've only found posts about broken masts due to non-sailing incidents.
2. Is there an expected lifetime for these masts when they need to be replaced? I've replaced all of my other rigging, but never considered replacing the mast.
3. I installed a spinnaker this season. It is the hobie spinnaker sold for this boat, but now I'm wondering if this boat can really handle the spinnaker.
4. Is it possible to get the remaining comp-tip out of my mast base so that I can only replace the comp-tip? (it was epoxied in)
5. Is there an alternative to the comp-tip mast? Even if the comp-tip transition was a foot or so higher, all of the rigging could connect to the aluminum part of the mast.

Thanks for your help,
David


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 10:11 am 
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That must have been a shock. Did the luff plus some of the comptip just flop back? Must have been a chore to get the sail back down, did you manage without any rips?

The comp tip should be able to be removed and replaced...someone on the se20 forum posted a video of removing the tip from his mast. HE used a chainfall. He had a bunch of stuff screwed into the comptip, once it broke free of the epoxy attaching to the mast, it pulled easily out.

Keep us informed if you find a better mast or non comp tip. I've never been comfortable with the concept of multiple materials in a mast (call me old-school). Yah, I know Hobie does it so they don't get sued by idiots who raise their mast into power wires.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 10:37 am 
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There is no specific life expectancy... your boat is a bit aged at 14 years. not "normal" for fail a mast, but masts are subject to extreme loads at times. Capsizes, counter rotated loads, poor spinnaker handling, high wind sailing, mast up storage, trailering... not glued in? All kinds of ways you "could" damage a mast.

The CompTip is replaceable.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 9:23 pm 
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Because the forestay and shrouds attach to the comp-tip and not the aluminum part of the mast, everything came down when the comp-tip broke off. I was able to salvage all of the sails with only minor damage.

Here is a picture of the mast:

Image

Admin edited the link:

Image


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 9:05 am 
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Was the CompTip glued into the aluminum extrusion?

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Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 10:24 am 
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I believe that it was. I bought the boat assembled from the sailboat shop in Austin. The two parts have never separated in the past 14 years. Also, the rest of the comptip is still stuck in the aluminum part of the mast. I am going to work on getting it out this weekend. I shoukd know for sure after that.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:21 pm 
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So sorry about the broken mast, but hopefully you can clean out the old section and attach a new one soon; it's good for the rest of us to be aware of...
Thanks for sharing.

Here's one possible cause that I just thought of:
If you do a fair amount of trailering, and if the comptip section hangs completely off the end of the mast cradle (especially with the additional end weight of the bob), perhaps from bouncing while transporting, it could have fractured in transit... and then broke off while under load on your next sail...???

Just a thought... I will definitely try to keep at least an inch or two of the comptip in (or forward of) the cradle to help prevent this... I have consistently avoided transporting with the bob attached for this reason.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:49 pm 
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Thanks for the feedback. I was able to remove the remaining part of the comp-tip this weekend and confirmed that it was glued in.

Here is a picture of the end of the comp-tip I removed. The thickness of the fiberglass is not uniform. It is about half as thick on one side as the other. This seems odd to me, but maybe its within specifications.


Image

To answer SailScott's question:
I store my boat in covered storage less than a mile from the beach where I sail, so it gets minimal trailering. I put the mast with the bob in the back and don't allow it to extend beyond the hulls, so the comp-tip definitely wasn't hanging off the end and the bob was very close to the back cross bar. I was five miles out when this happened, so it may have been weak from age and previous stress when I started, but it was strong enough to sail for a good while before breaking. (~30 minutes)

Does anyone know if the new comp-tip comes with the foam already in, or do you add the foam after you glue it in? There was a hole in my mast (with a plug) a little below the comp-tip. I was wondering if I am supposed to spray foam in there after I glue in the new comp-tip.

Looking around on the web, I can pick up an old H16 for less than the price of the comp-tip. The hulls and tramp are trashed, but the mast, sails, and other rigging are in good shape. I'm thinking of trying to use a H16 mast (no comp-tip) on my getaway so I don't have this same problem again. I would have to change out the base. I'm not sure what to do about the extra length (I think its about 1.5 feet longer). I could trim it to the correct getaway length, or keep it longer and try using the H16 sails and rigging. Has anyone tried anything like this before? Is this a bad idea? I'd appreciate any feedback.

Thanks,
David


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 9:14 am 
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A new CompTip has the foam in the base and all of the hardware. Just epoxy in to the mast and it's ready to sail.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 10:02 am 
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IF you decide to go the H16 route, after you change the mast base, you also will probably have to move the hound so the shrouds fit, so you might as well use the Getaway jib--alternatively you can get new shrouds to fit. You probably should move the bob to the top, as well. If there's no comptip you also won't "have" to use the mast hook for the halyard and cleat the halyard at the mast base cleat (or install a rope clutch)--some H16s have the comptip, though. I wouldn't cut off the extra length until I see how it sails and I'd use the Getaway mainsail (you would probably hate going back to a boom). The mast bend characteristics will be different, so the camber on the mainsail will be off a little. I doubt you will notice, though-especially if you don't hoist the getaway main all the way to the top.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 11:41 am 
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Hello Dksailor

Sorry to hear about you luck.
I am surprised that no one has asked yet, do you centre the traveler and snug down and cleat the main sheet when you have the spinnaker deployed? This is important as it acts as a back stay for the mast with the spinnaker deployed. Not doing this can lead to mast failure. I would imagine the comp tip it would be even more susceptible than a one piece aluminum mast.

I am not impressed with the variation in wall thickness on that comp tip. May not be a factor, but less than ideal.

You probably know this, but the spin kit was not designed for the Getaway, it was designed for the Hobie 16. It is being marketed for the Getaway thought. Did you do the install yourself?

Good luck getting back on the water!

Jason


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 9:17 pm 
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Hi Jason,

I did read about the main acting as a back stay when using the spin, so I have been keeping the main sheet tight. However, I do let it travel out some since I am using the spin when sailing in a broad reach. I hadn't realized (or read) that the traveler needs to be centered. I was thinking that it would still function as a back stay even traveled out as long as it was sheeted tight.

I installed the spin kit myself. I did know it was designed for the H16, but Hobie also markets it for the Getaway in their accessory catalog, so I assumed the boat could handle it. If other people aren't having issues, then it must be due to me doing something wrong, or the age of my boat. However, it is clear that the comp tip to aluminum junction is going to be the weak point in the mast, and the spin connects pretty high on the comp-tip, giving it good leverage against this weak point.

The H16 mast I am looking at has all the rigging. I was hoping I could install a getaway mast base and possibly re-use the H16 shrouds. My main sail is 14 years old, so I might consider having a new sail made very similar to the getaway sail, but 1.5 feet taller to pair with the new mast. I definitely want to stay boomless. Has anyone had sails made? I wonder how expensive that would be.

Thanks,
David


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 9:56 pm 
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Mainsails can get very expensive ($1 to 2 thousand+) depending on the sailmaker, materials to use (carbon, strings, mylar, yadda yadda). Reef points, batten systems...

If you are going to go that route, I'd see how the boat sails for a while before looking at bigger sails. The rigging may not fit from the 16. I don't know where the chainplates are on a 16 compared to on the Getaway. Measure carefully or you could end up with mast falling on hoist (I did that once, raised mast with shrouds too long...went over and on top of my truck--insurance company was unhappy (they insured both car and boat, fortunately)> When I do major changes to a boat, I prefer to do them incrementally as much as possible.

Once you decide you do want bigger sails, might get an estimate for modifying the 16 sail for boomless or extending the existing getaway main. The sailmaker will probably ask you a bunch of stuff you don't know the answer to, like mast prebend. Just say "I dunno, but I can bring it to you to measure".

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:25 pm 
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Jason - I found several pictures online of Getaways with spinnakers and I see the main traveled out in all of them, including the getaway spinnaker picture in the Hobie catalog.

David


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:27 am 
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The 'trick' with spinnakers is to let the mainsheet act as a backstay, so that the mast does not get pulled forward, which might lead to the mast snapping or bending.
The traveler should be set as close or as wide as wind conditions permit.
You don't have to centre the traveler.....the traveler acts as your 'relief valve' to reduce pressure on the main.
Hope this helps.

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