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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 9:26 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 12:07 am
Posts: 19
Hi all,

Since I have not yet sailed a beach cat of any type (only keeled monohulls), maybe this is a stupid question. But... all of the internet info is on how to make the getaway faster, which I totally get and am eager to do as well.

Before I do that however, I would like to be sure I can keep it slow and upright the first few times I am out with my kids, or loaded with camping gear.

I fully plan to get myself used to the boat first, and practice capsizing etc before I bring the kids aboard, but my kids are young and timid enough that if we capsize the first day out they may never get on again. Ease them into it, and they will be trapezing in no time I am sure.

What are your strategies for slow and stable? Or will this be obvious once aboard?

Cheers,


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 9:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 185
Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
If you have sailed mono-hulls, then speed control is exactly the same. Unless you are in more extreme winds, speed is totally under your control via a combination of helm and sheeting in/out.

Aside from some nuances, your only 'big' learning curve will be when you try to tack the first few times. You need a bit of speed built up to make it easier and you can't just throw the rudder hard over. It has to be done gracefully or the double hulls will dig in and come to a halt as they don't like to turn sharp.

I highly recommend picking up a book on cat sailing or racing. Like you I expect, I considered my self a pretty decent small craft sailor but bought a book on cats when I got mine and I found a lot of useful tips in it. I think it made the transition a lot smoother.

I have http://www.amazon.ca/Catamaran-Sailing-CATAMARAN-Apr-17-1999-Paperback/dp/039331880X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1397148597&sr=1-2&keywords=catamaran+sailing by Phil Berman

The old style pictures in it leave a lot to be desired but the content is still very much relevant. My wife pretty much learned how to sail by reading it and practicing last year. I stayed as silent as I could unless she asked a question so as to avoid "the look" if I tried to give unsolicited advice but once she understood how the wind works in a sail from the book, she got the feel of things very quickly.

I have very little to offer the experts on this board, so I try to be slightly helpful by chiming in on these easier ones. However, the experts will likely have more to add as well.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:19 am 
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Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 6:28 am
Posts: 94
Location: Detroit, Michigan
On the clew of the mainsail you will see that there are 5 different holes to attach the mainsheet rigging to. This is one of the great features of the Getaway. Attaching at the uppermost hole will give you best performance. Attaching at the lowest hole will give you maximum stability. I have been out with my wife in very high winds, and with the lowest setting the boat is very stable an not the least bit "tippy". As you get more experience/comfort start moving to the next higher hole to increase performance. You will find you can tune for whatever conditions you are looking for.

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Dave


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 702
Location: Nepean S.C. Ottawa, Canada
For stability, you will also want to note 'boat trim'....
Upwind, your weight should be centred around the shrouds, sometimes a touch further forward.
Beam reaching and downwind, move your weight to the stern as much as possible.

The Getaway is not a light craft, so practice your capsize under very controlled conditions, with lots of help.
Use your body weight, not your arm strength, and keep the bow at 30 degrees to the wind.
When the Getaway starts to come upright, get out of the way of the 'hull in the air', as it comes crashing down.
Do remember to grab the dolphin striker/front cross bar to prevent the G from flipping the other way.....
don't ask how I know.

Tacking is something you'll have to get used to.... let's say life is different on a cat.

There must be other opinions out there??

Good winds

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1989 Hobie SX18 Sail # 1947
'Only two things are infinite, the universe, and human stupidity. But I'm not sure about the former.'


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:45 am 
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Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 2593
Location: Jersey Shore
The most effective way to keep the boat slow and upright is to carefully pick the days you choose to sail. As long as the wind is less than 10 mph, there is very little chance that you'll capsize. The Getaway is a very stable and forgiving boat. Do your homework - watch the weather and pick a good day.

The second thing would be to educate your kids about the possibility of capsize before you take them out. Let them know that any small sailboat can capsize and that it's normal. The boat won't sink and they're not in any danger as long as they keep their life jackets on and stay with the boat. That way if it does happen, they're not taken totally by surprise.

sm


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:53 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 702
Location: Nepean S.C. Ottawa, Canada
Great ideas Steve, especially about keeping the kids informed.
Suggest you make a game of the 'practice capsize' so they can be more comfortable with the whole issue of small craft sailing....
come to think of it, we did that years ago, and later my son would love it when we flew a hull.

Now at age 20, he is not happy unless we are flying a hull....

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1989 Hobie SX18 Sail # 1947
'Only two things are infinite, the universe, and human stupidity. But I'm not sure about the former.'


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PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 5:12 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2008 8:12 pm
Posts: 52
You can make the capsize drill a lot of fun by making it an adventure for the kids. Pick a day where the wind is barely blowing, just enough to allow you to move and steer the boat. Be sure that everyone has their life jacket on correctly. Go out where you won't be in the way of other boats and have the kids get onto the "downhill" side of the boat. Release the main sheet and jib sheet so that they can run free. You'll have to grab the side stay and lean back to get the boat to fall over. Don't worry, it will go pretty slow because the wind won't be blowing the boat over.

Now have everyone help you right the boat with the righting line. It will come up quite easily with their help. Watch out for that upper hull as it comes down. Have everyone climb aboard.

Everyone will now see how easy it is to right the boat. Now knock the boat down again. Allow the kids to climb up to the hull that is way up there in the air. Let them jump off the hull into the lake (make sure that you are not in shallow water!). When I first did this with my son he was 8 years old and we had two of his buddies along. They had a blast climbing and jumping - to the point that we had to go out every once in a while to use the boat as a dive platform! It completely took away the mystery and fear of what happens during a knockdown.

To help avoid an accidental knockdown when the wind is strong or gusty, be sure to hold the main sheet in your hand instead of cleating it off. You can let out the main, relieving the pressure on the sail, much quicker when it is in your hand.

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JT Cole
Clermont, FL
'03 Getaway
'05 Wave


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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 8:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 8:28 am
Posts: 746
Location: Clinton Lake, KS
Jtcole is right on! We did the same kind of playing with several newer sailors last year and it totally transformed their sailing. They went from sailing around ridiculously undersheeting and dumping it all in every puff to going out in much more extreme conditions flying hulls like manics. All simply because they became comfortable with getting a little wet at the lake during the summer. :)


At the end of the day this will help you keep it upright as you won't be afraid to really learn what you can and cannot do.


Sent from my stone tablet


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