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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:16 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:09 pm
Posts: 18
I am seriously considering a new Wave. I would be trailering this boat whenever I want to use it. Can someone (hopefully anyone with similar trailering experience as well as any Hobie employees - Matt?) give me the "real world" scenario in terms of what it takes to rig the Wave to be ready to sail when trailering? Is it a hair-splitting, tedious hour long episode to set up and take down? Are there a lot of tedious little adjustments to the mast that need to be made each time one wants to sail? What is the real world bottom line on tjis for someone of average capability and skill, not an expert, but not a beginner, for example. I am particularly interested in this topic with respect to adjusting the shrouds and forestay as well as whether or not rigging this boat and stepping the mast by oneself if easy or if two people are required.

Can anyone give me some insight. I know a lot of people end up selling boats due to lack of use. And, often times, that lack of use comes from the frustration of having to rig the boat each time one wants to sail. I don't want to make that mistake. Please advise....

THANKS.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:04 pm 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2005 9:47 pm
Posts: 589
Location: San Diego
Rigging is really simple. My boat is stored on top of a 13' aluminum fishing boat. The mast is taken completely off and slid apart. I also take the rudders off to lift it on and off the boat. It is awkard, but it can be done alone (lifting the boat onto or off of the aluminum boat). Once the boat is on the ground, I place the mast tube on the base, I slide in the comptip, connect the two shrouds, place the main halyard on the mast cleat, loop the halyard end through the bridle wire adjuster, step the mast, pull on the line to lift the bridle to where I can grab it to attach the forestay. Then I attach the rudders and tiller crossbar (you will have to detach one side of the tiller crossbar unless you have someone to hold the mast above it) hoist the main, hook up the mainsheet, put into the drainplug and I am off. The total process takes about fifteen minutes alone. I also have a beach dolly, this makes moving the rigged boat much easier.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:10 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 6:49 pm
Posts: 21
Location: Fraser, MI
I do not think you will find an easier boat to rig than the Wave.

I take off the tiller crossbar before I hoist the mast. I'm a lady and have no trouble throwing the mast by myself. I do however have someone else with me to clip the bridle wires. I reconnect the tiller crossbar back onto the rudder system. I then put the mainsheet on the tramp and back up to the launch site.

Before pushing her off I get out of my car and unleash the 4 wave tiedowns securing the sailboat to the trailer. I get back in my car, finish backing up and push her into the water (by myself no problem). I park my car and then hoist the sail. This process takes about 10 to 15 minutes, depending upon how fast I'm moving.

When returning to shore, I find the most difficult part is getting her back on the trailer (by myself that is). If I chose to submerge the wheel bearings in the lake water I would not have a problem.....but that is not recommended for obvious reasons so I don't do that. It is easier to have someone with me to help push the sailboat back up on the trailer.

I've had my Wave about a month and absolutely love it. I used to own a 16 foot Prindle several years back. I had a blast on that boat but it did take longer to rig and I had a really hard time throwing the mast myself.

I really do believe that you'll love this boat and its easy set-up.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:51 pm 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 6:49 pm
Posts: 21
Location: Fraser, MI
I forgot to mention in my write-up below that I leave the mast in one piece and have a mast holder on my trailer.

You should not have to mess with the shrouds or any of that. Just remove the crossbar, connect the mast pin to the mast base and step the mast into position.

I purchased a couple of options with my Wave and have found them invaluable. I had the dealer cut an inspection port in each hull and then install the hull fat bags.

I also purchased the traveler kit for the Wave and really like the fact that I can fine tune the sail (THANK YOU Matt!) Of course, you need the club version of the Wave in order to accomodate the traveler track (and you may not wan to mess with a lace up tramp). But I would definitely get the 5" inspection ports.


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 Post subject: even a child
PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2006 10:44 am 
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Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 9:59 am
Posts: 280
Location: Mill Creek, WA
Just to throw in..................

My 12 year old son watched the set-up video and then went out to the yard and set the boat up with his mom in 30 minutes. Note, it was in a completly disassembled state. We have the classic model. We completly take the boat apart and load it in the bed of our truck.
My wife loves the simplicity. She took it camping with her friends and set it up by herself. She doesn't really know how to sail, but it didn't stop her from having a blast.


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