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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 12:29 pm 
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Well, today was D-day for me and my new wave, I had never sailed or even been on a sail boat.. ever.

Well, when I started out this morning the wind was around 10mph gusting 15, and I quickly got comfortable and got a feel for the boat and was having a pretty great time. The wind was very gusty and inconsistent, one moment im moving really fast, then next moment.. nothing, but still I was having a good time.


Then, it got really really bad, really really fast, the wind picked up to gusting well over 35, my small lake had white caps and rolling waves. So I started tying to head back to shore, into the wind.


I was either in irons, or I was over, the wind was so strong that if I got more than 30 degrees sideways to it I would go over, no matter what. I got flipped 7 times in one hour, one time the wind hitting the bottom of the trampoline actually drove the mast bob down and almost fully hurtled the boat. I figured out eventually that if I shifted my weight to the front of the boat I could get it to turn into the wind and then get it flipped back over.
I lost my hat, and a $600 DSLR camera and its waterproof case. it came untied and fell off the boat and all I could do was watch it float away, I had no ability to maneuver, it took everything I had to stay upright, I didn't even care about the camera, I just wanted to get back..

It took me about 15 min to to get out to where I was, and over an hour to get back. I had to stop and adjust the tension on the mast wires, they became very loose.

I called a buddy on the drive home and told him what all happened, and he told me when its that bad, I either need a reefable sail, or I need to stay home.

Here in south Texas windy days are the norm not the exception, though this days was worse than normal, it got me thinking hard about getting the zipper reef sail, I hate to spend more money considering i just paid full price for this sucker, but it does me no good sitting the garage.

Thoughs? Opinions on said sail?


I learned a lot today, a whole lot, so it wasn't a total loss, but man it was not fun.

I cant wait to try it again :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 2:45 pm 
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Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
:shock: I've sailed since I was a little kid and I wouldn't even think of taking out a hobie out solo if it was going to be gusting over 25!

Wait for a nice 5-10 Knot day and try again! Figure out how to sail first then worry about reefing and tuning :D

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 3:54 pm 
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To be honest, I knew better, I knew it was going to be windy... but I just came off of call and had been working 14 days straight AND I WAS GOING SAILING DAMMIT!

Its going to be windy tomorrow too, though not as bad as today, I need some fat friends.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 4:30 pm 
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Location: BC, Canada
I second this -- wait for 5, with gusting up to 10 knots. When it realty blows, I would highly recommend Catamaran Sailing:From Start to Finish by Phillip L. Berman. I've go it for free in my local library, but is also available in Amazon,
http://books.google.ca/books?id=0-NeVovnRtIC&lpg=PR13&dq=hobie+cat+catamaran&pg=PP1&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

Sorry for your camera, man. I am using a small water proof Sony point-and-shooter, and save my D-SLR fro more solid grounds. It is much more practical than a clunky DSLR and takes decent HD videos too.

I am not even sure the Wave is designated for winds over 20 knots. Last what you want is to break your brand new toy.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 10:11 pm 
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the camera I lost was a Sony NEX-5 and a DicaPac case :(

Lately its been very windy here, so its either no or go it seems, I have a different game plan for tomorrow, Im going to take a different leg of the lake that is 90% perpendicular to the wind, instead of the rout I took today, if it kicks up I can hug the near shore and get shelter and cruise easy, if its lax i can get further out and get into it more.

Will see how it pans out.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 9:00 am 
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I also was out on lake Conroe, TX 12/03 it was very windy so before I got underway I raked back my mast a bit, but would never try this while sailing even on a calm day. If you were to loose hold of that stay, down goes the mast and on your way to leeward shores. I won’t repeat the above posts it’s all good and anything you don’t want to lose should be tied down or have a lanyard to your body, check some of posts that show camera mounts that work very well, very impressive videos.
I also brought my Wave new and more than once thought new boats aren’t for new sailors, but the Wave is a tuff boat and can take the mistakes. It takes time and practice and you will be looking for those high winds, yesterday was pretty windy and like you wrote look for those calmer areas where you’re not getting the full on wind. I thought that I would try that and as I got across the lake the area was high and dry the lake is way low by close to 9-12 ft here is a picture of where I launch. I couldn't get the picture to take :shock: , but the web site is "e-z storage Willis Texas on hwy 1097"

Not the best picture but you can see the sandbar that I have to maneuver through. Used to I could tie my wave to the railing while I rigged my sails, now I don’t have to worry about my bottom cause the water is so low that its past the cement and down to the sand bottom.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 9:46 am 
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Don't loose hope that it gets better. As others have said it is best to head out when it is less windy until you get proficient with the Wave. I second the idea of raking the mast aft but in 35 that still won't really be enough. Those are survival conditions at best. I've been out in 25+ and it was borderline controllable. Not bad reaching around but trying to get to windward is very tough. And nix the idea of reefing the sail. Without a boom and additional length on the wire part of the halyard with more stops you won't be able to get a shape that you will be able to control. You will have a smaller sail but you won't be able to control the shape.
As per the camera, how big is the lake? Scope out the shore where it was likely to drift. Borrow a canoe if you need to. Good luck!


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:23 am 
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Location: Brookings, south dakota
I also would agree never let newbees or brothers out in that high of wind. Even the wind you started with would have been max for someone that has never sailed before. I also agree don't go buy a new sail until you really know the one you have. My friend has a zipper sail and I have never seen him use it.

frozen in south dakota


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:02 pm 
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Well I went out today to a MUCH smaller lake in town, it is partially sheltered and the wind, even when its really windy is not bad there. I had a GREAT time, I find I learn much better when I don't have the feeling of creeping death in my head the entire time :mrgreen: got her up to a whopping 9mph according to my tracking. :mrgreen:

got lots of practice tacking and getting a feel for things, I wore a full dry suit and tied everything down. I really tried to get comfortable with hiking out when the boat starts to pick up instead of just letting out the sail every time.

I think (for me) its all about getting a feel for the limits of the boat, once I get comfortable pushing it a bit I will have some real fun.

A buddy of mine told me "Yea when ya get comfortable with it you will be trying to get up on one hull instead of trying to avoid it"


One thing that concerns me, is all my tell tails are fraying at the ends really bad, I don't see them lasting many more trips.... I guess yesterday took its tole on them. :?

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 3:11 pm 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Sounds great Wingnutt!

I always compare sailing a little Hobie to Golf. Anyone can do it, but there are SO many things to learn to be great at it. I started out on my Adventure Island, and learned from there. Then bought a Bravo, and will one day buy a Getaway.

On your first day, you went out with the pro's to the PGA tour, instead of going to the local par 3 course.

Looks like you'll be just fine. Glad you had fun today. Nothing wrong with taking it easy and perfecting your skill before you head out in more difficult conditions!

About the Tell Tales, you can get new ones from the Hobie Catalog. Not a big deal.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 9:17 am 
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The Wave is the first cat I ever sailed. Loads of dinghy and keel boat miles under my belt but growing up in the North East cats were not where the action was. The Wave has been such an eye opener for me and while I was able tp push it right away there were differences that I learned pretty quick and a few things I found were sort of go faster tips.
When I am out just blasting around the lake I tend to avoid tacking as gybing is quicker and unlike a dinghy isn't much more tippy even in the higher winds. Just get to the new windward before completing the turn and keep the sheet out of the cleat through the whole thing. Also keep the sheet out of the cleat as much as possible. Turning at speed is also no problem.
When I do tack I try and get the boat up to speed before making the turn. Have also found if I move aft as I start to turn the boat seems to tack faster as I have made the waterline a little shorter.
The Wave seems to give a pretty good indication that a capsize may be coming. The windward hull will fly low even in good wind, once it starts going up after that you need to react to keep it upright. That said it still doesn't go over too fast, except in the 35 you were out in, then it slams you over I guess.
If you go over, don't go over the high side like on a laser, it's a long way down and people bounce off of Wave hulls :wink: , I know. This will also propel you away from the boat and to windward, not good. I have since learned to climb down the tramp and go around an end. Much less painful.
Have fun out there!


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:31 pm 
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:lol:

Quote:
One thing that concerns me, is all my tell tails are fraying at the ends really bad, I don't see them lasting many more trips.... I guess yesterday took its tole on them. :?
Get out an old video tape cassette, break it apart, and snip off 16" or so and tie a piece to each stay. Great wind tails...

Also, when it's windy rake the mast back as far as forestay adjuster allows.

And, this is when you tighten the battens in snugly. It makes the sail flatter. The more flat a sail the better it does in high wind. Looser battens gives the sail more cup and more lift.

Finally, tie a bowline in the downhaul, thread the other end through tack and down through the cleat, then back up through the eye of the bowline. Pull down and tie to cleat. You may have to go through the tack twice if there is extra rope. This gives you extra leverage to pull the sail down and flatten it in high wind also. Go loose in lower winds.

Sounds like good times!

EDIT:
Quote:
Looser battens gives the sail more cup and more lift.
That is wrong, my mistake! Tight battens give more cup. Looser give less cup. Many say don't mess with trying to adjust sail with batten tension. Check this:

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=32632&p=127725&hilit=loose+battens#p127725

This is good download: http://www.hobieclass.com/site/hobie/ih ... HobieU.pdf

Search feature on forum is valuable.


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