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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2004 1:40 pm 
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Location: Tallahassee, FL
There has been some discussion among Outback and other Mirage drivers about how to set up the pedals: straps on, straps off, types of footwear, etc., so I thought I would put in my .02 worth.

1. Pedals: First off, the pedals are the same type that you find on the typical health club exercise bikes. The first thing the customers do when a new bike comes on the floor is to remove the restraining straps from the pedals. I first thought this was pretty dumb, but you quickly realize that the straps are not necessary to keep your foot on the pedal anyway. In addition, the straps are a PINTA to adjust each time you want to use the bike. So, my advice is to get rid of your straps?you won?t miss them much, if at all. If you have a ridged-type shoe or boot sole (see below), your feet will stay on the pedals just fine. And if you switch between bare feet and shoes or boots, or between different yakkers, you won't have to keep adjusting the straps.

2. Footwear: Lots of options out there now with all the "aquatic boots" available. I have tried dive boots with hard soles, dive boots with soft soles, flip-flops, TEVAs, tennis/athletic shoes, etc., but they all had problems of one type or another, especially with bits of sand and shell getting between your foot and the shoe--extremely annoying, not to mention uncomfortable. I have since found what to me is the perfect pedaling/wading footwear for any place you might find loose sand or fine shell substrates: neoprene flats boots, sometimes called wading boots (see photos below). These have a heavy-duty zipper down one side. They are sold by Offshore Angler (the saltwater branch of Bass Pro Shops) and Cabelas, among others, for from $20 to $40. They have a sturdy, ridged, and pretty much puncture proof sole, a necessity in my area where we have extremely sharp oyster reefs that will tear up a shoe if you wade-fish (or a boat hull) in a hurry. The ridged sole also provides plenty of traction/grip so that I had no problem with my feet slipping off the pedals, even with the straps in my garage at home.

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3. Boots: The great thing about the type of flats boot you see here (in addition to the thick sole) is the Velcro closure strap around the ankle (black strap at top). The boots fit pretty snugly anyway, but not so snugly that bits of shell and sand can?t get in. However, once you snug up the Velcro strap, there ain?t nuttin? getting inside, except water. If you get a pair, be sure you get them with the ankle closure strap, since I have seen some without this. I first thought going all day with a boot full of water might be a problem, but it has proven to be pretty comfortable, since the boots act like a typical wet suit bootie to keep your foot warm. I seem to recall having seen advertised a flats boot with a built-in purge valve to get rid of excess water?seems like a good idea, but I am not certain that it is necessary. You can even drive your vehicle with these on (even with water in them) for short distances with no problem.

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4. Socks: I have tried both a thin, nylon-type wicking sock that I wear inside hiking boots beneath my regular wool socks, or just a pair of regular, heavy, cotton athletic socks, and both seem to work just fine. The boots are extremely roomy, and caused me no rubbing, no chafing, and no blisters with either type of sock. Just order them in your normal shoe size. Try ?em?I think you?ll like ?em, especially if you pedal, paddle, and/or wade-fish.
Dick

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Last edited by Apalach on Wed Sep 13, 2006 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:21 pm 
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Apalach wrote:
...So, my advice is to get rid of your straps—you won’t miss them much, if at all...


When I'm out in chop or playing in the surf in my Outback, I value those straps - they help hold me in as I cling on to what I can with my hands. I do wish the Outback had a little better handhold (indentation) on the outside of the kayak. Not much to grip onto when you really need an edge to grab ahold of.


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 Post subject: pedle straps
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 10:17 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Felton, CA.
Another good reason to keep the straps on, is exercise. For instance,when I mountain bike, I have clipless pedles, my feet are locked to my bike pedles. When I encounter a hill, I can use both my legs to push and pull with each stroke. They also help with balance. I can "feel" my bike. Not worry about either of my feet comming off a pedle and potientlly harming a more sensitive area from the ensuing fall.
Back to the kayak. With my feet in the pedle straps, I can use the same principal when pedling the kayak as I do riding my Mtn bike. I can push and pull with each leg on each stroke of the pedle.
Also, I can hang my feet from the pedles, and not have to "hold" them up on the pedle.
I guess it all depends on whats comfortable for you.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2005 7:13 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:14 pm
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Location: Tallahassee, Florida
I use the straps quite a bit. They make a great leverage point for when you are pulling in fish and you are trying to keep your center of gravity in the center of the yak.


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