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 Post subject: sail it flat!
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 2:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 25, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 16
In a previous post, a question was raised about the ablility to steer under high degrees of heel. The best response would be to try and keep the boat flat or at a minimal heel. The Sunfish Bible has a whole section dedicated to this topic. Most small craft perfom better at minimal angles of heel as compared to the rail down radical stuff you may see at some regattas. In the Outback, the rudder profile is reduced as heel increases.

Of course you can keep the boat flat with either the sheet or by shifting your weight (the equivalent of hiking out on a sail boat). The weight shift in a SOT kayak can get interesting! I move over as far as possible and lean my upper body away from the sail during puffs. I have a long trunk and relatively short arms and legs. I struggle to reach the tiller on a port tack (sail on Left?) when I have to lean toward the right.

With the sail on the left, I use the sheet and pedals to control my direction. When I really want to boogie, I put the sail to the right, pedal, lean over hard and trim till the mast shows a little bend. The bow wave makes a satisfving chuckle!

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Keith
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 Post subject: port vs starboard
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:04 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:53 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Minnesota
Keith,

In sailing terms, "port tack" means the wind is coming from the port side of the vessel, or left side if you are sitting facing the bow. So the sail would be on the right while you are on the port tack.

I sold my sailboat (a 19-foot sloop-rigged pocket cruiser) last fall and had been casting about for an interesting vessel to purchase or build. Then I came across this Mirage drive/kayak combination at a boat show. What an intrigueing setup. I ordered a Hobie Mirage Adventure. I can't believe I've missed noticing this revolutionary drive system over the past few years. From an enginnering standpoint, paddles are nowhere near as efficient as a screw or fins. And I have much more lower body strength than upper body strength.

I can sail it too? Sign me up, Hobie!!!


Klay


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 Post subject: Sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 7:37 pm 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 6:56 am
Posts: 822
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Hey Klay,
A hearty welcome to the dark side of kayaks and kayak sailing. Indeed, the Mirage Drive is an incredible piece of gear, and you will have a fiirst row seat with your new Adventure. A new larger sail, rudder (already available), and Mirage drive flippers are in the works and designed to really show what the BigA can do. Have a blast!
Best,
Dick

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 Post subject: Hobie sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:53 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Minnesota
I have to admit I'm pretty excited about the idea of getting to know this new vessel. Maybe I missed noticing this new drive system because I have always been oriented toward sea kayaks and wasn't paying attention to fishing kayaks or any kind of shorter kayak. Then I saw the Mirage Adventure.

I had always been interested more in passagemaking rather than fishing, so that's why I liked to sail. I sold the sailboat because I decided I wanted something even smaller that was easier to set up for daysailing and also because I wanted to go exploring skinnier waters. I always thought there had to be a better way of getting power to the water than splashing around with a paddle. I go running every day, so I tend to try to think of ways of using my legs instead of paddling. What a revelation to find this drive system.

I keep on thinking about what kind of time I may be able to make across lakes and through waterways in the BWCA. I can see a lot of wilderness camping and exploring in my near future.

Thanks for the warm welcome.

Klay


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 6:56 am
Posts: 822
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Klay,
BTW, where are you located? Does the BWCA refer to the Boundary Waters area? I probably should, but don't know much about those frozen Northlands, if in fact that is what you are referring to.
Dick

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:16 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:53 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Minnesota
Dick,

Yes, I was referring to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. I'm in Minnesota. I'm pretty much frozen out of sailing at the moment, but spring is getting closer. What a relief, it looks like I should have something I can sail by spring, so I won't miss even a single season. I was beginning to wonder how it would feel not to have any kind of watercraft. Sailing is in my blood.

The Superior National Forest isn't bad for kayaking also. Complete wilderness is not an absolute necessity for me, as long as there's a place to camp.

When I am thoroughly familiar with the boat, I'll take it out on Lake Superior. I've always wanted to try out the new water trail up the north shore. I'm sure I'll go back to the Apostle Islands again. One has to be careful out on Lake Superior, perhaps even experiencing a chronic terror of the weather, in order have the proper respect for the lake. Especially in a kayak.

But maybe with this new drive system, I'll be able to get off the water more quickly in a situation where the weather is turning bad. I've paddled canoes for years and never have been happy with my efficiency or endurance. Here's a whole new situation with this mirage drive. Again, I can't believe I've missed it up to this point.

Klay


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 Post subject: sailing flat
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:53 pm
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Location: Minnesota
By the way, Keith, if you are still paying attention to this thread, I'll bet the problem with control you were having when heeled over was because too much of the rudder was lifting out of the water. I agree that solutions may be to get a bigger rudder, or try to shift weight to sail flatter?

I don't know for sure, because my kayak sailing is still theoretical ONLY at this point. I didn't notice how old your original post was, so you've probably got it all figured out by now.

Klay


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