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 Post subject: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:41 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 9:07 am
Posts: 96
Location: NW Arkansas
I've always wanted to sail and now I own an Outback and was wondering if it would be worth buying the sail kit. How fast will it sail? is it fun to sail?

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2010 Hobie Outback
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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 9:37 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2011 1:17 pm
Posts: 41
Location: Florida, USA
This is an easy question. Absolutely buy the sail, but also buy the sailing rudder (large rudder). The large rudder makes all the difference. If you are a bit nervous about getting wet or tipping over also add the side kick ama kit. If not, side kicks are definitely optional. The sail will make you go faster, but don't forget the outback hull design will only allow you to go so fast. But on the way home after a long paddle there is nothing more fun than pulling out the sail and cruising home under 100% sail power. If you have zero sailing experience this is also a great way to learn how to sail. The fear of not getting home is eliminated by the paddle and mirage drive.

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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
Posts: 509
Location: Auckland NZ
There are plenty of posts about sailing these boats elsewhere on the forums - worth researching them as the sailing is great fun.

Another thing I strongly recommend you consider is getting some very small turning blocks through which you lead the "sheet" (i.e. the rope you use to pull the sail in and out when sailing) to reduce friction in the sheet. One of these blocks goes at the rear of the boat (usually the rear carrying handle padeye) and the other somewhere in the cockpit forward of the helmsman so that the sheet comes to the helmsman's hand from the front of the boat not from the back (it feels more "right" to pull back on the sheet to flatten the sail rather than to push which is what you have to do if the sheet comes from behind you).
The reason it is important to have low friction in the sheet is because you want to be able to depower the sail instantly in the event that a gust of wind threatens to overpower and capsize you and the blocks allow the sheet to run very much more freely than if you lead the sheet just through the padeyes.

The other thing to bear in mind is that these boats can only really be sailed in very light winds; this does not detract from the enjoyment, rather it increases it because every sailing experience tends to be an enjoyable one (no going out/hanging on in howling gales - just gently pottering along in pleasant breezes). As you get more confident you may want to test the limits, but even in light winds you can get a more-than-acceptable paddling speed out of your kayak with next to no effort and little risk of a dunking as long as the wind is in the right direction.

Enjoy !


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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:03 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 9:07 am
Posts: 96
Location: NW Arkansas
Bobby and Stobbo ya'll have convinced me to get the sail kit. It's way to cold to start sailing and I'm all out of funds, but I'll be ready by summer. I added turbo fins and the sailing rudder this week to my outback. When I get my sail I'll need a little more instructions on proper rigging. The main thing is you sailers have your own language that is hard for us laymen to understand. I need to buy me a book or something to interpret what ya'll are saying. Buy the way I love getting wet. Are there more than one size sail for the outback?

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2010 Hobie Outback
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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
Posts: 509
Location: Auckland NZ
Only one size of sail.


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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:49 am
Posts: 403
Location: Point Lookout, Maryland
Sure - Outbacks can be sailed! We did it year before last and it got us so charged that we replaced it with the TI.

Here are our posts on the Outback:
http://boneinitsteeth.blogspot.com/search/label/Outback

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Mitch
    2010 Tandem Island
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    Chesapeake Bay and Eastern Shore
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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:59 am 
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Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 10:34 am
Posts: 134
Location: Portland, Texas
Here's a product I used several years ago to learn how to sail. It was well worth it in that it taught me the jargon and gave really good insight in handling a small sailboat.

http://www.learntosail.net/

Happy sailing!!!! - Roger

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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 1991
Location: High Point, NC
While the smaller Hobies and the related sail for them don't create true sailboats as we think of them, they can be sailed quite effectively, even into the wind (within the normal range, of course). It's a nice accessory to have and if you travel longer distances to your fishing grounds the sail kit and Amas are very worthwhile. As long as you have some breeze, you'll never be stranded.


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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 12:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
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Location: Auckland NZ
Quote:
While the smaller Hobies and the related sail for them don't create true sailboats as we think of them


hmmm... :? not sure I agree with this contention... ...what is a "true sailboat"?!

My $0.02 is that a Hobie kayak equipped with a sail performs exactly like any other sailing boat with a fixed mast(s) but on a "micro" scale.

Sure sailing kayaks are smaller and in most cases simpler (though you can mod them easily and cheaply to increase the complexity and similarity to more complex sail boats if you want). Apart from that IMO there's no difference except in speed/power, wind range, seaworthiness and pointing ability (which factors apply to every sailboat so Hobies are no different here either).

When I need a sailing fix I couldn't really care whether I am on a Hobie a "proper" yacht - the experience is basically identical. In fact the Hobie is SOOO much easier to set up and so much more engaging to sail than my other sailboats (2) that I rarely if ever bother to go out in the other ones... (note to self: sell boats because they simply don't get used enough). I have had other engaging sailing experiences (e.g. on Steinlager 2) but at far greater cost/commitment and with far less availability.

That said I am lucky to live in a place where the conditions are frequently ideal for a sailing kayak - it might be a lot less usable and enjoyable than a 'proper' sailboat in a more challenging environment (by which I mean weather, sea state, temperature etc).

On balance I think that anyone who is reasonably agile/fit/self-reliant who wants cheap, engaging, (did I mention CHEAP !?), accessible, independent day sailing/land-based overnighting and is content with and has access to a coastal/lake/river/estuary environment with good climate could do a whole lot worse than a sailing kayak as a first sailboat (and I would count Hobies as among the very best off the shelf packages available) either as a first step to 'greater' things or as a long-term proposition in its own right.


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 Post subject: Re: Outback sailing
PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2012 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 10:01 pm
Posts: 65
Location: Waco, Texas
Quote:
Another thing I strongly recommend you consider is getting some very small turning blocks through which you lead the "sheet" (i.e. the rope you use to pull the sail in and out when sailing) to reduce friction in the sheet. One of these blocks goes at the rear of the boat (usually the rear carrying handle padeye) and the other somewhere in the cockpit forward of the helmsman so that the sheet comes to the helmsman's hand from the front of the boat not from the back (it feels more "right" to pull back on the sheet to flatten the sail rather than to push which is what you have to do if the sheet comes from behind you).


Stubbo,

Could you post a picture of this? I am in the process of buying another, new Outback, sold my last one, but never sailed one, so I know ZIP about sailing. I want to use this fishing beyond the breakers out of Port Aransas and off PINS (Padre Island National Seashore) near Corpus Christi, going to the oil rigs, and trolling.

I really appreciate your help, too.

Ray

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