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PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:32 pm 
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dennyf wrote:
Revo, you said "This is a simple two handed method of controlling the main sheet with my right hand and furling/unfurling the sail with my left. The cam cleat eases hand fatigue from always holding tension on the main sheet, you just lock in place and go."

Did you mount the furling lines on the left side?

I'm just fixing to mount my fairlead and I like the idea of controlling the furling with my left hand and the main sheet with my right. The instructions show it on the the furling lines on the right but that's not set in stone.
Thanks Denny


I mounted mine on the right and wish now, I had done it on the left.

If I knew how to plug 2, 3/8" holes I'd move it.... :oops:

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 11:41 pm 
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flrider wrote:
If I knew how to plug 2, 3/8" holes I'd move it.... :oops:
That's easy enough to do. You can:
1. move the fairlead and plug the old holes with round or truss head machine screws, or
2. get some color matched matching "welding rod" from your dealer (I think he can order it at no charge), melt it into the holes carefully and shave off the overage with a razor blade for a neat, flush (practically invisible) appearance.

I use both techniques whenever changing deck hardware or fixing goofs. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 12:54 am 
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Roadrunner wrote:
flrider wrote:
If I knew how to plug 2, 3/8" holes I'd move it…. :oops:


…Or you could just keep the hardware in place and buy a 2nd set for the left side.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:34 am 
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Thomas wrote:
Roadrunner wrote:
flrider wrote:
If I knew how to plug 2, 3/8" holes I'd move it…. :oops:


…Or you could just keep the hardware in place and buy a 2nd set for the left side.


I like that idea Less fuss and if I so because someday, the new owner may prefer on the right hand side.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:40 am 
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["Roadrunner"]
flrider wrote:
If I knew how to plug 2, 3/8" holes I'd move it.... :oops:
That's easy enough to do. You can:

, melt it into the holes Carefully

I use both techniques whenever changing deck hardware or fixing goofs. 8)[/quote]

just out of curiosity, how do you melt The rod into a bottomless hole?

I know how to do that on drywall, but not sure how you would do that on a kayak?

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 3:30 pm 
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flrider wrote:
how do you melt the rod into a bottomless hole?


The "melted" plastic is not low viscosity, so won't simply flow like water. It hardens rather quickly.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 7:25 pm 
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flrider wrote:
just out of curiosity, how do you melt The rod into a bottomless hole?
You heat the end of the rod (or shaving) until the tip gets soft and gooey, then work it in from the edges if necessary. If the hole is large enough, do it in stages, letting the PE stabilize for a couple of minutes. This is different than "welding", where both surfaces are heated; it doesn't have as much strength, but for plugging holes, it is quick and easy and doesn't mess up the adjoining surface. Once you slice off the overage flush with a razor blade it becomes reasonably inconspicuous (depending on the size of the hole and surrounding surface).

A barbeque lighter make a good heat source. 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 5:06 am 
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Just installed the sail furler on a Mirage Sport (purchased two months ago but not the 2013 model). Benefited hugely from the practical installation advice in this thread - thanks, really did help me avoid mistakes.

I put the furling system on the left hand side, to keep it separate from mainsheet system. The fairlead was installed at an angle of around 45 degrees to the rail to keep the furling lines apart. The fairlead was placed only around 5 cm (2 inches) back from square with the mast to avoid interference with pedal movement (the ideal pedal setting for me in a Sport is #7), not the 5 inches specified in the instructions that came with the furler kit. The furler was fixed on the mast at the same height as the fairlead.

I did not bother installing the eye post or the pad eye, instead making use of existing fittings, rather than drilling new holes in my much loved 'yak. This required using a slighter longer length of rope than came with the kit. If you want to install the pad eye, you would probably need to use marine well nuts (or rivets?), rather than the conventional nuts and bolts that came with the kit, because I don't think you can reach far enough inside a Mirage Sport to tighten the conventional nuts.

So I took my Hobie out today for a test sail on Lake Ginninderra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. When I started out at around 5pm the wind speed according to Bureau of Meteorology observations was averaging 4 knots, but gusting to 7 knots. But an easterly change (a sort of sea breeze even though Canberra is 125 kilometres in a straight line from the coast) came through around 5:40 pm with winds averaging 19 knots and gusting to 24 knots.

I am an experienced sailor (Hobie 14; Laser; various wind surfers) but I capsized pretty soon after the change hit while I was under full sail. However, was able to handle the conditions pretty comfortably after that by reducing sail area using the sail furler. I thought the furling system worked very well under the conditions. IMHO, almost a 'must have' safety device if you want to comfortably sail a Hobie kayak.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2014 12:25 am 
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Lead Belly wrote:

I put the furling system on the left hand side, to keep it separate from mainsheet system..


I am about ready to switch over from the right side as it makes sense to me to have it opposite side of main sheet line.

Did you have any interference issues with the "steering" lever?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:34 pm 
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Lead Belly wrote:
Just installed the sail furler on a Mirage Sport....So I took my Hobie out today for a test sail on Lake Ginninderra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. When I started out at around 5pm the wind speed according to Bureau of Meteorology observations was averaging 4 knots, but gusting to 7 knots. But an easterly change (a sort of sea breeze even though Canberra is 125 kilometres in a straight line from the coast) came through around 5:40 pm with winds averaging 19 knots and gusting to 24 knots.

I am an experienced sailor (Hobie 14; Laser; various wind surfers) but I capsized pretty soon after the change hit while I was under full sail. However, was able to handle the conditions pretty comfortably after that by reducing sail area using the sail furler. I thought the furling system worked very well under the conditions. IMHO, almost a 'must have' safety device if you want to comfortably sail a Hobie kayak.
Nice evaluation! Not only does the furler reduce capsize risk when the wind turns out to be more than you bargain for, but it offers a quick and easy way to douse the sail if you want to take a break.

Anyone used to the AI or TI will miss the tangle of lines draped all over the lap with no place to put them, since these run down the side of the cockpit. I agree, the furler really adds versatility and a safety factor to the small sail. For those who have more than one Hobie, you can just get an extra fairlead and switch the furler from boat to boat along with the sail using Lead Belly's installation method. 8)


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:02 pm 
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This is a fantastic development and these notes are very useful - thanks to all the posters. Quick question for folk who know: the instructions dont seem to cover the unrigging process. Does the roller sheave stay on the mast and does this interfere with storing the mast broken down?

Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:41 pm 
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Furler sheave stays with the mast and is a smaller diameter than the furled sail. No problem fitting in the bag. You can easily toss the line loop into the bag as well.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 9:04 pm 
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Thanks mate, great to know. Just picked one up and hope to try it while I am still on holidays.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 5:15 pm 
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Location: Adelaide,Australia
Having just installed the furler kit on an Outback two things I noticed that make it easier to use are;
1.A light application of silicone spray to the bottom section of mast to reduce friction
2.A light tension on the main sheet to keep the sail tight on the mast
Both of these things made the sail much easier to furl and unfurl and a breeze to do one handed.
Hobie Kayak sailing just got a whole lot more enjoyable.
Kym


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 2:12 pm 
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I wanted to add a couple notes here from some of my previous posts before the furling kit was available.

These two steps will help make the furling process smoother.

1. Replace the flat nylon glide at the bottom of the mast with a 7/8" domed nylon glide. The domed glide reduces friction of the mast turning.

with a butter knife work out the flat glide
Image
Image

install a 7/8" domed glide
Image
Image

Hobie should add the domed glide to the furling kit. The bulk they could purchase would cost only a fraction of a cent to include with the kit.

2. When sliding the sail onto the mast twist the bungee twice creating an 'X'. Slide the mast through both loops and then stretch and lock to the furler hook. This will tighten the sail sleeve to the mast and it will furl easier. This worked great with my homemade furler and works great with the new furling kit.
Image

I know this is a repeat for some but for the newbies they are helpful tips.

Revo

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