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 Post subject: 2nd block for main line.
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:27 pm
Posts: 26
Last sail was taxing holding the line the whole time, but I realized I couldn't tie it off because I was adjust ing it the whole time, I have one block behind me on a movable line at the hatch. Do you think a second block up by me would make it easier to hold? Where do you recommend attaching it.

Also I tried to search it, but couldn't find a thread about how to right a capsized adventure with the standard sail on.
Thank you for any input.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:50 pm 
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I found a small carabiner which I attached to an eyelet up by the cockpit, definitely seemed to help, but haven't tried it yet in higher winds.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 26, 2013 11:52 pm
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Location: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
I think a second block is necessary with my Sport, around an arm's length from the seat. (I already have a small block at the stern carry handle bracket). I just purchased a Ronstan Series 40 RT Orbit Block (RF46101) that has a one-way ratchet effect under load. I am travelling at the moment so I haven't tried it out yet. I will post about how it performs later in the week.

I thought about a cam cleat as well but the Sport reacts so fast to wind gusts that I have the distinct impression that this would lead to more swimming.

I should say that I have only been sailing my Sport for a couple of months though I have had a fair bit of experience with other boats (Hobie 14, Laser, various wind surfers). My impression so far is that the Sport is quite a nice little sailer. The main sheet and sail furler give quite a bit of control over sail size and shape. And the little beastie tacks beautifully. The ability to change apparent wind direction through peddling makes for an interesting form of hybrid sailing, especially going to wind.

In regard to capsizing, have been ditched only once so far. (Happened very fast in a 25 knot wind; the kayak seemed to trip on its nose; I *think* the paddle stowed on the side dug into the water and twisted sideways). The kayak turned turtle (mast straight down). I hadn't practised righting the kayak so there was a real 'wonder what to do' moment. I was able to clamber on top of the hull enough to reach the far rail and right the kayak. I climbed on the kayak from the stern; I don't think you can get on from the side. The main problem was climbing over the seat which raised the kayak's centre of gravity a lot. Remember thinking that I wouldn't get away with that manoeuvre in even moderate wave conditions...

I strongly recommend practising righting and getting into your kayak close to shore, especially if you are not strong and flexible of body.


Last edited by Lead Belly on Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 11:11 am 
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I put a second block on my Revo11 up front like you are describing (furthest forward footwell area) and it feels more intuitive to me now to pull the mainline towards me to trim the sail rather than away from me. I think its also a bit more relaxing this way.
Like LeadBelly's experience, I dare not install/use a cam cleat because I will flip for sure, the baby revo is just that tippy.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 9:21 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm
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Location: Auckland NZ
A small block up front is definitely worthwhile as pulling is more intuitive than pushing the sheet. If I remember correctly you can just tie it on to a padeye in the front RHS of the cockpit - personally I wouldn't do much more than that - no need to drill holes or make it a fixture. You will also need a longer sheet, by the way!

As to righting the Adventure - I have turned turtle completely on mine on a number of occasions with all sail standing. As with any small boat the key is firm sustained pressure on one side of the inverted boat to bring it upright. If the inverted sail is cleated off then the pressure needs to move a large volume of water in the sail before it will come up but sustained firm pressure will do the trick and it isn't too hard: just keep your head and think and act logically.

Th other key is to have EVERYTHING tied on to your boat or you WILL lose it! Including the daggerboard which drops vertically out of its slot when completely inverted, is an expensive item to replace and floats like a stone (the little peg for the bungee is useless in terms of securing it) - can you detect the tone of bitter experience in this response?! (I now have mine tied on via a long-enough cord that I can stash it behind me when not in use and pull it forward & into the slot when I want to sail - and if I go over I would be highly unlikely to lose it). I also intend to find a way of securing the drive because I think the new click'n'go system might be more prone to unclicking than the old system was to unscrewing... and I don't want to lose my drive!

When you get your boat back upright you will probably find that everything is in a mess, fishing rods, daggerboard, seat, sheet & any other deck-top kit will be festooned all over the place and it may be easiest to sort some of the mess out from the water before you climb back on board because otherwise you may find yourself having to sit on things from which position it can be difficult to untangle them.

Finally, yes you can and in my experience you should use a cleat to tie the sheet off in benign conditions - it really does take the load off your hand and it is not particularly risky in the right conditions. My preference is most definitely a CLAMCLEAT (not to be confused with the other sort called camcleats). CLAMCLEATS are tiny and have no moving parts - you can put one inside the parcel tray (on the vertical wall) and there are various shims and things called "keepers" in the Clamcleats range to help line up the cleat to the direction of pull of the sheet and generally make the thing more useable. FWIW I am 110% satisfied with mine which is a simple cleat that is shimmed to angle it to the sheet and has a keeper to prevent it catching the sheet uninvited and make adjusting the sail trim easier.

Hope this helps.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 6:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
If you install a simple horn cleat, you can just take the sheet around it once and hold it. It won't slip if you just keep a little bit of pressure on it, but if you need to quickly dump it you can just relax your grip a tad and it'll slip.


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