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PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:04 pm 
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Got my tramps a few days ago. Got them mainly for taking the kids out, but tried them yesterday in steady 18mph winds. Lake Washington gets some waves in these conditions. When the boat rides high on a wave and the leeward ama is in the water, the windward ama flies really high. The windward tramp caught the wind just like a sail. At some point I got concerned that this could flip it. I could see how the leeward ama was really being pushed deeper into the water. Is there a recommended operating envelope (in mph) for the tramps? Anyone else getting "nervous" when the tramps fill with air ;-)

Thanks
-Iko


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:59 am 
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That is the best wind 15mph (any more and you really should be reefing the sail down a bit)....when it gets a little windy move your weight out onto the tramp - to flatten the boat back out and get some more speed! Yes, if you just sit in the cockpit and stay in the center of the boat - it will lean, and that could be a strange sensation if you are new - but I suggest using the tramps for leverage!


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 2:31 pm 
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Yup, hike out onto the tramp. That is partly why they are supposed to be there for.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 3:09 pm 
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Location: Marseille, France, Europe
Doesn't doing so put excessive stress on the boat ? I'm thinking of crossbars to hull connections, mast base etc ... The more outward weight, the more leverage, but still the same parts to take all that force. :?:


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 3:18 pm 
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Jbernier wrote:
That is the best wind 15mph (any more and you really should be reefing the sail down a bit)....when it gets a little windy move your weight out onto the tramp - to flatten the boat back out and get some more speed! Yes, if you just sit in the cockpit and stay in the center of the boat - it will lean, and that could be a strange sensation if you are new - but I suggest using the tramps for leverage!


I tried this technique yesterday. 12mph winds and some decent-sized waves... I only did it while tacking upwind tho. The way those waves were coming over on a beam reach, I didn't quite want to sit out on the back of the tramp! :D

I truly felt the need for a tiller extension. I saw this in our forum: Tiller Extension Thread


Has this paid off for anyone? I'd kinda like to do something like this (Ronstan Tiller Extension) but I am currently lacking on how to properly attach that to the top of the teenie tiny tiller.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 9:15 pm 
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Location: Gilbert, AZ
I agree with your AI tillar comment. I really wish Hobie would redesign it, especially because they now offer the tramps. Is there anything in the works Matt?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 2:31 am 
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Anymore I prefer sailing my AI from the windward tramp, shifting with tacks. I sit on the tramp cross legged much of the time. I imagine this is what riding a magic carpet is like, except that on the AI your bottom gets smacked by the water (advantage AI!). When I sail with a friend, one person stays in the cockpit and the other on the windward tramp. On tacks we shift simultaneously. No need for a tiller extension with two people, but it's a stretch to the tiller from the right hand trampoline and uncomfortable after a while. I think the tiller should be redesigned.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 10:59 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2008 4:07 pm
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Location: CLEARWATER, MN
I raised the same question a few months ago, when I installed
my tramps...
But as I got used to the 'windage' on the tramps...I started
to shift my weight onto the upwind tramp as others have
done...
Now I feel comfortable but wet when I get a strong wind abeam, to
hike out on the tramp.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:33 pm 
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Location: UK
This thead echoes some niggling thoughts which have been at the back of my mind for quite some time...

I have reasonable experience of sailing dinghies, slight experience in canoes and kayaks, and no experience at all in multihulls. Mostly, I have sailed in Yots, varying from 20foot to 70foot in length.

So, if you want a high-performance sailing experience, why would you choose a Kayak? Hobie make an excellent range of dedicated sailboats...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:37 pm 
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Location: Marseille, France, Europe
Yep, but which is the one that can:
- be car topped or pulled to the water on two wheels by a single person easily
- keep going in no wind
?
Genuine question, if there's one I'm interested !


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:38 pm 
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Location: Maui, Hawaii
Quote:
So, if you want a high-performance sailing experience, why would you choose a Kayak?

Easier transport, launch & land almost anywhere.

And sitting at water level even 5-6mph feels FAST!

Feels much faster than 3x the speed sitting or suspended 1-3' above the water. :)

Plus the AI just looks fast (especially with a spray skirt)! 8)

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:50 pm 
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Location: UK
I agree, the AI looks gorgeous, but is it really more portable than a Hobie-Cat catamaran?

I genuinely don't know how Hobie-Cats break down for transport

Ditch


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 2:43 pm 
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Location: back in TX Inks Lake near Burnet Tx
Ditch there is no comparison to the hobie cats as far as versatilty and ease of assembly, I know they are more expensive in the UK but I can't think of anything else that comes close to bang for buck. I have an 06 manufactured hull (07)model without any major problems (touch wood) years of fun, costing a pitance.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 2:56 pm 
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Location: Calga NSW, Australia
Ditch Crawler wrote:
This thead echoes some niggling thoughts which have been at the back of my mind for quite some time...

I have reasonable experience of sailing dinghies, slight experience in canoes and kayaks, and no experience at all in multihulls. Mostly, I have sailed in Yots, varying from 20foot to 70foot in length.

So, if you want a high-performance sailing experience, why would you choose a Kayak? Hobie make an excellent range of dedicated sailboats...

So DC, I don't really have any experience with high-performance sail boats. Can you tell me, what do you do in one of those suckers when the wind dies completely 10 miles from home?

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 1:36 pm 
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chrisj wrote:
So DC, I don't really have any experience with high-performance sail boats. Can you tell me, what do you do in one of those suckers when the wind dies completely 10 miles from home?

In a Hobie Cat, it's probably unwise to ever get that far from home (or from a rescue boat)! In a sailing dinghy, if you carry no outboard, it is probably also unwise to get that far from home, but if you have a pair of oars at least you could dump the sail and row - but whether you would make it 'home' would be doubtful - you might have to lay up somewhere and wait for the wind (or for a helpful friend or relative to come and get you...). In a yot, you would simply start the engine.


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