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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 1:23 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:35 am
Posts: 3
Hi everyone,

Had my first few sails in my new AI during the last couple of weeks, and thoroughly enjoyed myself!

Not having had any previous experience in sit-on-top kayaks, one question comes to mind though. How much water should I expect to be in the seating and storage areas during a light-wind sail or paddle/peddle? Even in light conditions there was quite a bit of water sloshing around in the drive well and coming up through the scupper holes at times (about 1/2" to 1" in the storage area). I'm about 100kg/200lb and had no additional gear. Would that be normal for this weight? I've seen video clips with people in street clothes/shoes ... I don't think I'm prepared to try that at this stage :)

Thanks

slt


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:14 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:16 am
Posts: 238
Location: HISC Chichester Harbour UK
There are some screw in plugs that go into the hull where the seat fits that when tight will stop a fair bit of water squirting up into the seat area. It is quite usual for there to be water sloshing about around the pedals. You will find that the amount varies depending on what position the pedals are in. I am usually sailing in choppy waves which means quite a lot of water gets splashed in. I usually have the seat bungs open, which means getting a wet backside, but any water that gets in drains out.
It is not uncommon for it to ship a bit of water inside the hull, I have a couple of sponges in there to soak up most of it.

I wouldn't describe the AI as a dry means of transport, unless you are on a nice smooth lake.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 12:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2009 11:28 pm
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Hi

If you go to the 'chop over bow' topic in the accessories area there are some suggestions there for cutting down on water entry. I haven't tried them yet as most of my sailing is in conditions where water is coming from everywhere anyway.

My tech knowledge doesn't run to posting a link sorry


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:45 am 
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:21 pm
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Location: Maui, Hawaii
With 250# between me and my gear when fishing, I've got just enough water in the AI's drivewell to keep fresh caught bait alive for hours while sailing or pedaling around trolling.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 10:02 am 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Water in the cockpit area is expected with this type of hull design.

For comfort, there are several design factors considered. There is a correlation between the seat height and boat stability. The higher (and drier) the seat, the LESS stable the boat will be. The lower the seat... the more stable. We shoot for a comfortable stable platform with a comfortable angle between the seat height and the pedals. When paddling, people are also more comfortable with their feet a bit lower than the seat height, so the balance between these and the level of the floor / water level allows for some water in the cockpit floor. This, of course, also depends on the weight of the user and the amount of gear carried.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 5:02 am
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Location: Sydney - Parramatta
Bit like it's given that landrovers leak oil, AI sailers get wet :lol:

Unless it's dead flat I get wet. I've tried taking the seat bungs out, but for me it only lets so much out and I still get left with a small amount and a wet arse. I'm trying to remember to take a sponge along.

Most of the water seems to come over the bow and land in my lap, usually from large stink boats and ferries. Spray shield fitted to the bow should reduce that. I have the Hobie tramps fitted and that slows down alot of the slop coming over the side.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:43 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 2:32 am
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Location: Calga NSW, Australia
I've got to say that with sprayshields, the plugs removed, an icomfort seat on top of the standard seat and a piece of pool noodle jammed in the angle between the back and bottom of the seat, I don't get very wet at all, even on fairly choppy days. (Until I have to jump out to put the wheels in at the end of the day :( )

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:35 am
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Thanks everyone,

I wasn't expecting a totally dry ride, and of course water coming over the sides in chop and when sailing would be normal. I was just a little surprised at how much water was coming up though the drive well and scupper holes, 60kg below the load limit, with the boad dead in calm water, concerned I guess of having a buoyancy issue. But hey, if it's normal I can live with it, and I think some sort of wet suit for cooler conditions is advisable anyway.

Cheers
slt

CGM, I'm not sure I understand the reference to leaky Land Rovers ... mine don't :) are you telling me it will :roll:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 2:28 am 
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Location: Sydney - Parramatta
slt wrote:
CGM, I'm not sure I understand the reference to leaky Land Rovers ... mine don't :) are you telling me it will :roll:


Yep, has to. Laws of nature. Landrovers eventually leak oil :D

There's a good selection of bad weather clothing about. I've been lucky and only needed to wear a spray jacket a couple of times. I do wear neoprene booties most of the time. Stops the underwater sharp stuff from hurting, stops sunburnt feet and keeps the feet warm. Neoprene's down side is it isn't fully windproof and can be bulky. There are a number of other products that also keep the wind off.

I usually carry my bad weather gear just in case things turn nasty. Doesn't help with the freeboard carrying everything though...

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