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PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2015 6:12 pm 
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Location: Paoli Pennsylvania - East Coast USA
The 2015 AI is heavy..... I weighed each component on a balance scale and the sum was 190#..... Sailing weight is easily 200+ with throw cushion, paddles, drinking water, life jackets and so-forth - especially with a gallon or more of water in the hull like I found after sailing today, my first day in significant wind.

The venue is New Jersey back bays and the beach is highly-abrasive quartz sand.

Today I did the conventional (?), merciful-for-the-hull-on-quartz-sand landings: sail at the beach, raise daggerboard, totally furl sail, turn 180 degrees on the boat's momentum so the stern is facing shore, raise the rudder, hop off, push down on the bow, and run the stern up on the beach until the hull hits sand.

But getting it far enough up the beach so that the onshore wind didn't flip it around broadside to the waves was a challenge.

I'm thinking maybe next time:

  • Sail balls-to-the-wall at the beach
    .
  • Furl the sail at the last moment
    .
  • Let the boat's momentum run it up on to the sand
    .
  • Maybe even flip down the seat back and plant my butt further back on the stern to raise the bow a little more
    .
  • Drag the hull around to face the water before taking off again.

The hope being that the legendary durability of polyethylene will tolerate that kind of abrasive abuse.......

What think Those Who Know?

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2015 8:05 pm 
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Assuming you're not having to deal with huge breakers to be surfed on the way in, I'd simply furl my sail a ways out from the beach and approach under pedal power, either feathering and running up on the beach at a gentle speed, or rounding up a few yards short of the beach and hopping out and doing whatever needs to be done at that point. A boat with a Mirage Drive is a heck of a lot easier to land than one without. You have a lot of options.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 6:48 am 
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Tom Kirkman wrote:
Assuming you're not having to deal with huge breakers to be surfed on the way in, I'd simply furl my sail a ways out from the beach and approach under pedal power, either feathering and running up on the beach at a gentle speed, or rounding up a few yards short of the beach and hopping out and doing whatever needs to be done at that point. A boat with a Mirage Drive is a heck of a lot easier to land than one without. You have a lot of options.

You run the folded Mirage Drive flippers up on to the sand?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:25 pm 
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When breakers are minimal, as are usually the case with offshore winds, I prefer to sail onto the beach leaving the sail out, lifting the daggerboard and mirage drive. I only uncleat the rudder but leave it down. This gives me some steering control without jeopardizing the rudder if it hits sand, etc.

I know we are told we can leave the mirage drive down but I don't like to jam all that sand into the chains, etc.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 8:24 pm 
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Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
With an onshore wind, I just sail into the beach head on, the sand here is very soft. Sometimes I pull the mirage drive, sometime I jusk hook the clip on the bungy (you can still peddle with the bungy on).


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 5:35 am 
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I wasn't paying attention- we were talking about onshore winds. In that case, I do not use the drift sock but I still sail onto the beach, pulling up the dagger board and mirage drive. The rudder gets release but not pulled up until the moment I am about to hit sand.

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“Out of sight of land the sailor feels safe. It is the beach that worries him.”
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Last edited by vetgam on Mon Oct 12, 2015 7:45 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 6:07 am 
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fusioneng wrote:
With an onshore wind, I just sail into the beach head on, the sand here is very soft.
Florida has coral sand, right?

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 7:06 am 
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Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
Actually in Sarasota the sand is pure quartz from the Mississippi, it the finest sand pure white sand on the planet, and our beaches are always in the top 5 in the world. Actually I think the whole state has a limestone foundation, covered with 50 ft of the same sand, which has been building up over the last 50 million yrs or so, Florida until 10,000 yrs ago was nearly triple it's current size, this is why it is so shallow 30-50 miles out (used to be land), which sucks if your into deep sea fishing (lol). It has the consistancy of granulated sugar. Down in Key west all the sand is coral (a little coarser) and typically mixed with shells on a limestone and ancient coral foundation with no natural fresh water source of any kind (interesting factoid). Our pool and spa in Key west is made from ancient coral (cool stuff).
What is really sad is as scuba divers we have been seeing and witnessing the coral reefs dying in just the last ten years (these are the only reefs in the US). My wife dove at sand key reef a few weeks ago and reported it is now dead (brought tears to my eyes). Took a 100,000 years to make, and we killed in ten yrs (sad). The really sad part was she was with a group, and a half dozen or so out of that group were diving down and breaking off coral to keep (which takes 10,000 yrs to grow to that state). Just the damage that one group did on one dive to the reef will take 30,000 yrs to recover, she was in tears over the experience. Ok I'll get off my horse now.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:19 am 
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fusioneng wrote:
What is really sad is as scuba divers we have been seeing and witnessing the coral reefs dying in just the last ten years (these are the only reefs in the US). My wife dove at sand key reef a few weeks ago and reported it is now dead (brought tears to my eyes). Took a 100,000 years to make, and we killed in ten yrs...

A loooooong time ago (the year that the movie "Where The Boys Are" came out) I and my college roommate drove down to Florida on spring break.

After watching the local rednecks beat up on college students for a couple of days, we moved on from Ft Lauderdale down to Crystal Springs and then to Key Largo National Park.

I will never forget either one. At the springs, we got in the water downstream from the tourist attraction and swam up through water so clear you could think there was no water. Just Googled Crystal Springs images and it does not look anywhere near as clear as I recollect.... not even half...

At Key Largo, we scuba'd and I will never forget the reef (or the barracudas circling us - apparently attracted to those nice shiny regulators).

Between that and surfing the North Shore of Oahu for several years I guess I have had the good fortune to experience natural beauty that nobody will ever experience again.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:57 pm 
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fusioneng wrote:
What is really sad is as scuba divers we have been seeing and witnessing the coral reefs dying in just the last ten years (these are the only reefs in the US). My wife dove at sand key reef a few weeks ago and reported it is now dead (brought tears to my eyes). Took a 100,000 years to make, and we killed in ten yrs (sad). The really sad part was she was with a group, and a half dozen or so out of that group were diving down and breaking off coral to keep (which takes 10,000 yrs to grow to that state).

Ten years does not a trend make, although maybe your fringe area of coral-viability zone is more fragile. Deeper into the tropics like my part of the US, I am actually seeing a revival of apparently dead coral in my backyard. Decades ago it appeared to be barren and stepped on... I only snorkeled there for the exercise and to watch the still-present fish near the dropoff. But last 10 years the skins started regrowing on apparently dead coral. Now bright and healthy coral seems to be meeting a wave of algae, which I read was introduced by past well-meaning scientists (to feed fish?) rather than some global factor.

This weekend I tried sailing in a shallow area which keeps the onshore waves down. Overheard a tour guide give his busload a "good old days" sermon about how you used to be able to wade a half mile to that island, but look now at the shoreline and all eroding away. Well even near high tide, I still could barely find enough depth to lower my rudder. I wanted to cool off, and had to stumble forever just to find 2 feet of water to immerse myself. My hull seemed to be covered with dog poo after pulling out, and I saw the eroded shore consisted of sort of soft potting soil. This spot's erosion appears to come from cheap fill in the war days when a P-38 runway was quickly installed, rather than sinister enviro-trends.

Not that bad trends don't exist, but some project those excessively. I remember when Crystal Springs manatees were almost always marked with gross propeller wounds, and when Hawaii turtles generally had huge white tumor growths. There is a pessimism that can come from aging rather than reality. The young bond with things at a peak of their cycle. When older, they focus on what cycled down and ignore what cycled up. This has been observed in travel book writing over the centuries... what is "ruined" is eternally rediscovered as wonderful by younger writers, who later decide it is ruined.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:16 am 
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I have not tried sailing off the beach yet even though I live directly on the beach. I'm too scared at this point. It seems that the general consensus is to furl the sail, pull the drive, pull the daggerboard, and release the rudder. My experience with releasing the rudder is that its just about worthless when not pulled tight (twist n stow style). Do you just paddle in from there?

I'm surprised there isn't a definitive way to land in the surf. I suppose there are just too many factors to take into account.

It's fairly shallow where I plan to launch and land and I'm thinking I should just pull everything, hop out, and wade the boat in.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:27 am 
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PurdueZach wrote:
I'm surprised there isn't a definitive way to land in the surf. I suppose there are just too many factors to take into account.

Depends on the size of the surf. Lots to break or lose if things go south, like broaching. These boats were not designed for surf landings. They ought to have a sign on each boat: "Surf land at your own risk!" Personally, I don't like to pull my AIs up on a beach with the drive in. Too much sand in the gears, and, if driven in hard, can break things on the drive.

Keith

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 5:11 pm 
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PurdueZach wrote:
It's fairly shallow where I plan to launch and land and I'm thinking I should just pull everything, hop out, and wade the boat in.

That was always my strategy with my Hobie 14's, my Hobie 16, and recently a 20' outrigger canoe: do a 180 in waist-to-chest-deep water; lock the rudders up; let the sails flog; dismount over the front; walk the boat in; and fine tune it's direction to face into the wind once it is on the sand.

But the asymmetric hulls of the 14's and the 16 would dig in to the sand enough to make it maintain their orientation into the wind. ....And the outrigger's wind profile plus the fact that the sail was dropped before being walked in made it a non-issue for the outrigger.

OTOH, my 2015 AI will not stay oriented: an onshore wind will flip it around sideways to the wash from the waves.

The only way to prevent that is to get the hull further up on the sand than I am able to drag 200# backwards without busting a gut.


Hence my wondering if the AI's polyetheylene hull material would stand up to just sailing full speed at the beach - fast enough that momentum carries it up the requsite distance - and then dragging/rotating it to face the water again.


Experience tells me that neither the 14/16's polyester/fiberglass nor the outrigger canoe's epoxy-glass over wood will stand up to that abuse on New Jersey quartz sand.


But will the AI's polyethelene ?

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 9:44 am 
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I think these hulls can take quite a beating being dragged in the sand. My 09 hulls look like hell on the bottom, but they are still going strong with no problems that I can tell.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:01 pm 
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Slip the wheels into the scupper holes underneath before landing.

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