Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Fri Oct 31, 2014 3:55 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 4:25 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 12:58 pm
Posts: 77
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
My wife tried a tandem adventure island over the weekend and feel in love with it. Now we are looking for a used one. What are some things I should watch out for? Any known issues with this boat?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:53 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 am
Posts: 1375
Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
domromer:
That was your first mistake, letting her try one out. It happens to all of us, we even bought ours without trying it out so don't feel bad.
Buying a TI is like leasing a car, you are only paying for the short time that you own it, not the whole thing. The TI is probably one of the most popular boats on the market today, and with that it comes from Hobiecat company which is way out in front of every other manufacturer in support and service, and everyone knows and expects this from Hobie. That's why we are willing to pay a little more (you definitely get what you pay for) for a Hobie product over some other manufacturer like Ocean or Wilderness as examples (not trying to pick on them).
Because we live in Florida near the water, there is a kayak in nearly every yard. We have now owned 7 Hobie kayaks and I can give you plenty of examples of their retained value just from my own experience of selling my used boats (we are on our 3rd TI now).
If you look around ( example craigslist) in an area like Sarasota near the water in sunny Florida where there are lots of boats you can find old used Ocean, and Wilderness kayaks for as low as $50 bucks, basically they are a dime a dozen, and many people buy cheap kayaks thinking they are going to go out and use them all the time, well it's more work than they expected and they end up just sitting in their yard or their garage for a couple years baking in the sun and they are trying to get rid of them, that's pretty much human nature. Now with Hobie kayaks it's a little different story, most if not all Hobie owners are existing kayak owners, and have met or talked to someone with a Hobie and find out all about them (a different world altogether). Most Hobie kayaks are used and enjoyed by their owners on a regular basis (they are already hook on the sport and the lifestyle before ever buying a Hobie).
As a result you will see very few Hobie kayaks on the resale market, and the used ones that are for sale hold their value better than pretty much anything else out there on the market.
Hobie's have a very good 2 yr warranty, where if pretty much anything happens to the boat Hobie fixes or replaces it, this is huge.
As far as the Tandem Island goes the design has changed very little from the original design first released in spring 2010. Pretty much all the 2010 models had their rudders upgraded to the new and improved rudder design (all for free to any registered buyers). Yea there have been a couple minor improvements since then (things like improved AKA bars, improved front AKA cross bar design, and a few other minor things, but it's not worth upgrading most of this stuff if the boat you get doesn't have all the improved features, in as the old stuff worked just fine.
Also keep in mind that the TI has increased in price quite a bit since it's introduction. When I bought mine in 2010 I believe the list price was $4250 brand new, so you had better not pay anything close to that for a used 2010 model. 2010's are now out of warranty so I would be leery about buying a 2010 model unless it was below $2500 bucks, even at that I would be looking it over very closely for problems (mostly a bad or leaky hull, which basically scraps the boat out).
The newer boats 2012 and up are typically around 80% to 90% of new price (depending on condition). This is what I was talking about above when I said it's just like leasing, basically you can buy a new TI for $5500, use it for a year, then turn around and sell it for $4700 to $5000. Your cost of ownership was $500 to $800 dollars (not including accessories of course). I think you can count on Hobies holding their value way better than most boats out there.

I wouldn't be scared to buy a 2010 as long as the price is right. If buying used, my preference would be a 2012 or newer (there have been very few changes from 2012 to current), if you can get one that still has some warranty left, I think it would make me more comfortable.
The most important things to look for are any hull damage and leaks (make sure you physically test and trial the boat).
Any apparent neglect or severe abuse signs (like anything that was used as a rental for example). Small scratches in the hull are normal, and can be fixed and cleaned up, but any very deep gouge needs to be evaluated, and or repaired before you buy it. All Hobies dealers are pretty hand at welding the hulls to repair minor scratches, and Hobie supplies the matching plastic welding rod, and has a plastic welder in their catalog if you want to repair scratches yourself (it's pretty easy).
Buying a used TI is a great way to get a trailer, and accessories like trampolines, scupper carts, etc, as they are usually included with a used boat, and none of that stuff is cheap if you have to buy it new.
If the mast or sail is messed up, be aware that replacements are very expensive (thousands of dollars). Things like ropes and little stuff can all be replaced, Mirage drives are completely repairable. It's not a show stopper if the boat has been left out in the sun and the cloth mesh pockets are all faded and stretched out, they can easily be replaced for around $30 bucks apiece. But a very faded out boat means it has been stored in the sun too much, and I would be very cautious. Most of us do not store our boats in the sun.
Hope this helps you
Bob


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:11 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 12:58 pm
Posts: 77
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Thanks for the info. I've never owned another hobie kayaks but I have owned a native ultimate 12 and I currently own a hobie wave so I guess I fit right into that demographic you mentioned. One question I have is that I live in an apartment so a trailer is pretty much out of the question. My plan is to put it in the 6ft bed of my truck with a hitch mounted ten ft bed extender. I did this with the hobie 14 ft kayak that I rented and this seemed to work out well. Do you think this same set up is doable with the 18ft tandem?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:43 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 am
Posts: 1375
Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
domromer :
I also have one of those hitch extenders that I bought on Amazon for around $90 bucks, I've used the heck out of the thing. I have a Yukon Denali SUV so we have the extender mounted so I can put the TI on the roof, it works great. The hitch extender can be used either way (either rooftop or extend-a-bed). I have seen others using them with their pickups and boat sticking out the back of their pickup, with no issues. If I had a pickup that's what I would be doing. Just put a flag on it and make sure it's strapped down well. My hitch extender has has a weight capacity of I think 500 lbs, which is well within the weight limits since the hull alone weighs around 100 lbs. Just strap the mast to the top of the hull (that's what I do). I lift the boat without the AMA's mounted (much easier), then just strap the AMA along side the boat. Once off the car I find it easier for me to just carry the AMA's and roll the boat (on the scupper cart) separately down to the water, then put it all together at the waters edge.
Bob


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:49 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2010 8:58 pm
Posts: 22
Location: Bay Area, California
I also put it on top like Fusioneng but it is a Acura MDX. I bought the Yakima goal post that fits in the hitch and also a front portable rack to better distribute the weight across the top of the car. It rides great. I live in the Bay Area in Calif. And have taken it to the Sierra Mountains, Lake tahoe, Oregon, Idaho and the California coast. It is a great way to experience the waterways.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

_________________
Wile-E-Kayak

San Jose, California
TI - AUG- 2010


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group