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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 10:13 am 
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Thanks for posting your photos as well snjsanders. Hopefully our Broughton Island trip in a few weeks time will grow into a similar annual event that we all can't wait for.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:03 pm 
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Thanks for taking us along for the Fairwell Terry trip - I only wish I could have attended

.. What great friends she has

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 7:09 am 
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Because of the length of this thread & the many topics covered, I have made a Table of Contents. This Table is on p. 22, http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=7276&start=315 Keith


The Best Fishing Trip Ever
(with pictures to prove it)


Our recent trip to Cape Romano brought back memories of a spectacular fishing trip. This is the story of that trip and the continual change to the western shore of the Cape.

Nancy and I kayaked with our friends to Cape Romano in April 2005. Except for Lou Greenwell, we were all new to the Cape. Lou had been to the Cape Romano area many times in his youth─he was our guide. We camped on a 100 yd long stretch of beach facing the Gulf of Mexico. The beach was about 100' wide with a moat bordering the back side. The moat was part of Morgan Lake. Morgan Lake is a tidal lake with a couple of cuts to the Gulf on the West and Morgan River on the East side. Morgan River snakes its way northward through mangrove swamps before emerging onto Gullivan Bay.

Lou and Natasha Pyle enjoy a fire at sundown.

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On this trip, there were some robust winds out of the west. Along with the surf, they pounded the vulnerable Cape Romano shore.

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Here are our tents: ours, Lou's and Cindy's -- closest to the edge of that sand bank.

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In the middle of the night, I gave Cindy a hand moving her tent back from the edge─the sand bank had eroded enough that her tent was in danger. Next morning, with Cindy's and Lou's tents moved, evidence of the erosion is evident.

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A couple more pictures on the trip: Cindy Augustyn and Nancy

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Natasha

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While Lou and the women hiked down to the dome house,

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I did a little fishing in the surf. I was surprised to quickly hook and lose a snook. That was the only fish I hooked, but I realized fish were around. So, when camping season started the following Fall, several of us went back to Cape Romano. Our camp: Lou among the tents and sea oats. Notice the large bank of sand is gone. Our tents are on the highest ground available in the area─not much room to spare at high tide. It was November 2005.

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That beach is gone now, but more on that later. That day in November 2005, we fished. Snook is the premier inshore sport fish and is generally considered to be the best tasting Florida fish. Lou and Rick Bartoli show off their snook. Lou and Rick had a great day fishing ─ easily out fishing everyone else. Many of these pictures were taken by Natasha, others by Lou, Rick, and me.

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The author and a redfish

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The author and a snook

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Lou with large sea trout

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Rick with a jack cravelle

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Blue Runner ─ not good eating, but puts up a fierce fight.

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We caught fish from morning...

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'til sundown.

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Come nightfall, we relaxed.
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It was my very best fishing trip -- ever. I think that went for the others too. A large group of us came back 2 weeks later to try and duplicate it, but it didn't happen.

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However, on that return trip, I did catch the biggest fish─a 32" snook.

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We've been back to the Cape many times trying to repeat that great 2005 fishing trip; but, it has never happened -- not even close.

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2007 was the first time we had some AIs there.

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Bill Waller caught this juvenile tarpon─a strong fighting fish─which was released unharmed.

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In 2006, I did a solo trip.

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The most memorable thing from that solo trip was a lure with a hook stuck in my hand and a very wild 5 lb snook on the other end of the lure. It would not have been that unusual, except it was the first of two hooks I embedded in my hand that day. The best part? With my earlier experience, I knew exactly how to remove the second hook.

In digging through old pictures of Cape Romano trips, I found this one of Nancy with a very young Josh Morgan. It was November 2008. The water in the background is the "mote" on the back side of the beach.

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At low tide, sandbars can peek out of water:

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Waves frequently sweep across the beaches of Cape Romano.

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And, that is part of the problem. The beach where all the fish were caught is gone. Perhaps, I should say the beach moved, but that gives the impression it is still useable. It is not. Look again at the picture of Nancy & Josh.

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The mote, part of Morgan Lake, is gone. The beach sand has been pushed back by the relentless westerly breezes and storms. They have pushed that beach sand back into the mote and further into the mangroves on the other side. That beautiful, breezy campsite is gone. Gone, also, are the sea oats. This Google Earth 2003 vs. 2013 image comparison shows the dramatic difference in the western shore of Cape Romano. In the 2003 image, it is near low tide. The 2013 image is higher tide, but close inspection of the 2 images shows dramatic changes in the western shoreline. As the beach sand gets pushed into the mangroves, our beautiful beach has disappeared, the mangroves die, Cape Romano is a little smaller, and the sea has reclaimed some real estate. The circled portion includes about 1.5 mi of shore.

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With severe storms on the increase with global warming, the beach erosion on Cape Romano will likely worsen. How will that affect fishing? I haven't a clue. If I'm around in 10 yrs, I will venture an observation.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Last edited by Chekika on Tue May 06, 2014 12:54 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 8:36 am 
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Thanks Keith, now I feel even worse that we cancelled our trip! (no really thanks for showing what sounds like a perfect outing - and I know only too well how we always try, but never quite succeed, to make it happen as well as it did the first time).

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 9:39 am 
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You've got some great memories from your expeditions Keith. And these reports really do show the value of photos to not only you but us as well.

And by the way, I feel your pain.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 4:36 am 
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Ouch!!

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"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:13 am 
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I used option 1 Keith, which option did you use ? ( not for the fainthearted )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgfpsupmu98

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 4:17 am 
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Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
Slaughter:
Over here they do something called hillbilly hand fishing. I'm picturing in my mind a bunch of buddy's standing on shore with beer in hand asking you to wade out into the water. You know for sure something is up and they are attempting hillbilly shark fishing if they all yell out from shore asking you to walk back and forth and splash around.
Good friends good times (LOL)
Bob


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:07 am 
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Slaughter,

I’ve seen that self-mutilation video of “how to remove a hook.” My first hook accident was in 1993. I had a long break until 2006, the 2-hook-day. I certainly wouldn’t want to say “mine was worse than yours” (your location was not good,) because, as soon as I say that, people come up with terrible and worse examples. Still, for the folks who have never had a hook accident, hooks in the palm of your hand are problematic. Your skin is tough, but the skin on the palm of your hand is extra tough. When you run a barbed hook through that, you have a physical and mental problem. Physical: first, now you only have one hand to work with. Second, that extra tough palm skin is a problem for any method of hook removal.

The mental problem: how much pain can you take? Most of us can handle it, but, as Slaughter implies, it is going to hurt and hurt bad. Get yourself ready for that. Once the hook pulls out, the severe pain resides rapidly.

I took the easy way out in 1993. It was a fresh-water hook in a finger early on the 1st morning of a 3-day camping trip. It easy to get at. I simply cut it off, put a piece of tape around the remaining hook and finger and finished the trip. The morning after, I went to a medical clinic on campus and had it removed. All relatively painless.

In 2006, my 2-hook-day, nothing was simple. The first hook was part of a strong, salt-water treble hook. I could not cut it off with my Leatherman tool. It was also clear that the hook had to be removed—I had to paddle my sea kayak 7 miles back to the mainland. Besides, it happened at first light of the first full day of my trip—2 more days to go. Because it was a treble hook and the palm skin was tough and not flexible enough, it could not be forced through the skin—option 1, self-mutilation video. After considerable thought, I concluded that it had to simply be pulled out the way it went in—option 2 of video. Today, on my AI, I carry more tools, but in 2006, I only had my Leatherman. Grasping the hook with the Leatherman pliers, I pulled hard—nothing, but lots of pain. At least that first try got me mentally prepared for the job—it had to be done. Second try, it came out.

Later in the day, when I got the 2nd treble hook in my hand, it was a straight-forward matter to remove it.

Final lesson from that day in 2006: I realized, on a lure, the rear hook is for the fish, and the front hook is for you. For that reason, most of my lures have the front hook removed.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Last edited by Chekika on Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:46 pm 
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I hope (and expect) that someone on this accident prone forum can 1-up Keith's story. :oops:

I'm finding this oddly entertaining. :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:37 pm 
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NOHUHU wrote:
I'm finding this oddly entertaining. :lol:


Sicko ! :lol:

Quite a story Keith. We were miles from anywhere, about a 2 days paddle, when the hook went in my leg, so it had to be removed there and then. As soon as one of my 'so called' mates realised what had to be done, he was off, and while I was experiencing something in the same category as child berth, I can still picture through tear filled eyes, him pulling in a bass on the other side of the river. Absolutely no compassion.

The skin at the back of the knee is really elastic but not overly sensitive. Still, I don't want to do it again in a hurry.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 12:01 am 
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And I no longer leave treble hooked lures laying on the hobie seat. :shock:

(One more reason to love Hakas).


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:15 am 
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Fusioneng— “Hillbilly Handfishing” is a real technic for large catfish in Alabama, Mississippi, & such places. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillbilly_Handfishin'

The technic you describe, city-dude splashing around in the water, would work very well for gators & crocs in the Everglades after dark. I would venture to say, it is guaranteed to be 100% successful.

NOHUHU— I agree, no treble hook lures lying around Hobie seat is a great idea and excellent use of hakas. My memory is a bit hazy, but someone sat on a lure with treble hooks and had to have the hooks surgically removed. And, there is my brother-in-law who hooked his Dad in the head with his lure--also needed surgical removal.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 11:43 am 
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I had a big rapala sitting on the tramp couple years back in baja. While fighting a Dorado (Mahi mahi), and kneeling on the tramp, the fish hit the tramp from underneath and bounced that damn lure right under my shin. When i knelt down it Pinned my leg to the tramp. Landed the dodo, then cut the tramp to free my leg, then did the line trick on the hook in my shin....

I'm don't leave pointy or sharp things on the tramp or haka anymore


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 2:13 am 
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Keith,
I have just made a set of your miniskirts (they look really great in a lovely shade of dune!), and have a few observations/suggextions.

I noted that you have used twisted metal to bind the bungee ends. I have had a lot of success using 2mm wide zip-ties (bigger ones for higher loads), and being plastic, there is no possibility of rust.

I am using the Coolaroo clips, and see that I will need to drill starter holes to get through the multiple layers at the corners. Did you have similar difficulty?

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