Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Tue Jul 22, 2014 9:02 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 501 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 6:44 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 am
Posts: 1194
Location: sarasota,fl
Tony:
I have a similar double bungy setup on my TI. But instead of a big honking metal bracket I just used a small piece of spectra rudder string in a cinch knot. Since I always have lots of things attached to those cleats on the aka bars ( ie... Spray skirts, boarding ladder, tramps, AMA bungys, etc) I can attach all my stuff and will have room for more. Looping the string over the cleat doesn't seem to take any longer than before. It's actually pretty amazing to me that the spectra string is rated at over 300 lbs ( each strand x 2 equals 600 lbs) yet that metal cleat you have in the pic looks like the ones I buy and the package says 530 lbs (less).
I've been running the spectra double bungy setup for over a year now with no issues, and am able to climb in and out if the boat by sitting on the AMA (which I couldn't do before). Plus when we are out snorkeling I have people sitting on the AMA's all the time now.
We pretty much use our TI as our mother ship where we launch from Higgs beach (on the south side of Key West island in Florida) and go out just off shore for the afternoon. I usually tow out our 4 person raft filled with coolers of food and gear, we also have a few inflatable kayaks that I tow out, along with other kayaks that people may have, we call it our party barge.
Actually I'm thinking about making a big sun shade (like an easy up) that we can erect once we get out there and anchored, ( probably a re-purposed tent fly).
We kind of do the same thing up here in sarasota but the destination is usually sand bars where we meet up with our powerboating friends.
We basically still do all the same stuff we used to do with our Sea Ray powerboat, just take us a little longer to get there ( lol). Instead of cruising at 30mph and spending $40 bucks in fuel, we cruise at 10 mph and it costs me a buck.
The really cool part is with the power boat we could only access 10% of the inter coastal (pretty much have to stay in channels). With the TI I can reach 90% of the areas.
I guess that makes my TI a po mans powerboat (lol). Sorry for drifting off topic.
Bob


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 11:20 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1428
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Gee Bob, they are not really THAT big! :D . What I like about them though, is that they are easy to undo with any multi-tool, and as I now carry a couple of spares in my safety kit, it is a cinch to undo the shackle and unscrew the broken bungee and screw in a replacement. I would also suggest that the breaking strain of the SS shackle is more thn adequate.

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 12:39 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 1845
Location: South Florida
Terrific "Wave Buster", Tony. And, both you and Bob have nice "double bungee" systems. My double bungee system is U-G-L-Y in comparison. Still, the one thing I like about mine is it uses 2 top hats, so every thing on my U-G-L-Y system is doubled.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 6:46 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 1845
Location: South Florida
How to Include Pictures (Images) in Your Hobie Forum Post--Step by Step Instructions

The Hobie forums are very well managed, however, they do not “host” pictures (images.) Therefore, you must store your photos on a photo hosting site such as Photobucket http://s239.photobucket.com/ PB is free up to a fairly generous storage limit. You must “Sign Up” initially. The Sign Up page looks like this,

Image


Once you are signed in, the Log In page looks like this. I believe you can use your "username" in place of your email to log in.

Image


Once logged in, Your Bucket page looks like this,

Image


Pick off the upper menu item “Library.” Your Library page will look something like this,

Image


Now you are ready to upload pictures to your Photobucket and insert them into your Hobie Forum post.

    • Upload your pictures onto PB. This is a simple drag (from your computer photo folder) and drop (into your Photobucket Library folder.) STOP! TIP: Before you load any pictures into your PB, it is a good idea to organize your photos into albums (folders). So, pick off “Create New Album” button, give it a name, and put your pictures into that. The majority of my PB pictures are in albums, but 264 are in my PB general bucket, and occasionally I have to look through all of them to find a picture.
    • Slide your pointer over a photo and you will see a "gear" icon appear in the upper right corner.
    • Slide your pointer over the gear icon and a menu will appear.
    • From the menu, pick off "links" with your left pointer button.
    • A window will appear with 4 URL options. Click the "Direct" link with your left pointer button--momentarily a "copied" appears. You have now copied the link.
    • Paste the link into your Hobie forum post.
    • When the "Direct" link is pasted into your Hobie forum post, highlight it, and click on the "Img" button above to complete the job. When your post is previewed or submitted, your picture (on Photobucket) will appear in your post.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 7:07 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:57 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Salem, Oregon USA
Chekika wrote:
YakAttaque wrote:
I recommend buying the TI, for solo expedition trips, for these reasons:
1- A luxurious amount of cargo space for above-board dry bags in the forward area.
2- Increased waterline means increased speed (sailing fact), especially if balanced by seating yourself in the rear and your cargo forward.
3- Captain comfort, staying more dry and with less sea motion in the stern.
4- Pitch your tent on it! (equipped with tramps) incredibly comfortable and expands your camping options exponentially.
5- You can transport an unpredicted passenger when needed, which has happened to me more times then I can count.

I certainly have my own biases based on where and how I sail and camp. Therefore, I'm wondering.
    (1) Have you ever camped with your TI where there were significant tide changes, say greater than a meter?
    (2) Have you ever experienced significant wave action (like along a coastal area) when camping on your TI?
    (3) Would you make the same recommendations for a person who usually launches from a beach and prefers camping on shore to camping on a TI/AI?
    (4) Have you ever hauled your TI loaded with camping gear up a beach (> 5' vertical) to get it above high tide line?
    (5) Have you used an AI on camping trips?
    (6) Do you think you could carry enough camping gear/supplies for an extended expedition on an AI?
    (7) Do you think a tent could be pitched on an AI?
    (8) Do you think you could stay sufficiently dry using a dry suit or dry pants with integral socks & anorak top on an AI?
    (9) Would you make the same recommendation for a solo woman?
    (10) Would you make the same recommendation for a person over 70? 65? 60?
    (11) Would you recommend the solo TI over an AI for the 300 mile, saltwater coastal WaterTribe Everglades Challenge?

BTW, YakAttaque, I missed your videos which you posted about sailing on fresh water in Oregon, but I've caught up on them--excellent!

Keith


Keith,

Thanks, it's good to hear someone watches my youtube vids :)
A few of your questions seem to point toward getting the TI above the high tide line. I agree this can be a problem. I usually unload mine before hand, then lift one end and drag, drop, lift the other end, etc. until I feel comfortable with the height, then I tie it to something secure in case i misjudged or it's hit by a micro-burst. I've never attempted to sleep on it while it's afloat, so wave action isn't keeping me awake.

I've never used an AI, I do have a hobie mirage with a sail which I've used for week-end trips, so I know an AI is more then adequate, but for 7-days or more, the TI is perfect. I think you could pitch a tent on an AI, I'm not certain but I think they use the same tramp size. The TI weighs a ton, even with the caddie on, so if there is going to be a lot of land distance, no boat ramp, the AI would probably work better. If your wearing a dry suit, you will need to be soaked just to keep from overheating, I have one but only use it when its cold and I'm sitting in the front seat of the TI.

Being in Oregon, I haven't done the Everglades Challenge, but if I were, and I had the choice, I would go with the TI, because of the dryer ride and longer waterline.

In 2 weeks I start a 2 week-long trip from northern Vancouver Island, where there are 23 foot tides (2nd biggest in the world), almost all 'beaches' are rocks covered with slick seaweed, and one my have a small surf to deal with. My plan is to pack in such a way that I can offload/onload easily, to lighten the yak. I'll update on how it went.

YakAttaque


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 10:49 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 1845
Location: South Florida
YakAttaque, I'm looking forward to hear about your Vancouver Island trip. I'm sure it will be interesting.

My concern with using a TI for serious solo expedition trips is weight. Period.

    First, my observation with people using a TI for camping is that they tend to bring even more stuff than AI campers. Considering that I bring just about everything except the kitchen sink on my AI, that is saying something. My rule when camping (which I should follow more carefully) is "Less is more!" That is the less you bring, the easier it is to pack/unpack, and the easier it is to find things. Those simplifying steps mean you can enjoy your trip more.

    2nd, you can easily bring everything you need for an extended camp trip on an AI including all your water--why bring more? Along Vancouver Island, you can probably find fresh water, which is not the case in the Everglades. Again, why bring more? The AI has plenty of room.

    3rd, using paddle pants with integral socks and an anorak, I can easily stay dry on my AI during any trip. If it is warm, I remove the anorak & splash water on the pants. I know guys who "live" in their dry suits during the WaterTribe Everglades Challenge. Your dry suit/pants must be breathable.

    4th, even the designer of the AI and TI, Jim Czarnowski, used an AI on his last 2 Everglades Challenge trips--that is a pretty strong endorsement of the AI on extended camping trips.

    5th, yes, the TI is faster and that is very nice, but, you pay for that speed over the AI in extra weight on the TI. When I do a solo camp trip on my AI, I'm carrying between 125-150# of gear & supplies/water. When I arrive at a beach to camp, I immediately unload heavy stuff--water in Dromedary bags, cooler, 1 haka (for a table), tent, and kitchen bag. When I begin to pull my partially loaded AI up the beach above the high tide line, my AI will weigh at least 140-150#. At my age, that is a tough. I time my arrival at my camping beach to avoid low tide. Still, I'm usually looking at hauling my AI up 3-5' vertical. With a partially loaded TI, my guess is you would be looking at pulling 225# and more up that beach--I know I could not do that. From your videos, Yak, you look fairly young--50 yrs maybe? Yes, you can probably pull your TI up a beach to get it above a high tide line. However, I question whether a woman or 65 yr. old male could do it.

Regarding setting up a tent on either an AI or TI, that can certainly be done and has been done. However, camping on an AI or TI along coastal Everglades (or any coastal region) has its own set of problems (hazards) and inconveniences. We'll have to have that discussion another time.

Keith

PS I forgot to mention that Dogslife (see another post about him http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=52088&p=238289#p238289) did his first Everglades Challenge in a Tandem--he did not finish, which is not unusual for a first timer. However, he subsequently bought and used an AI in the last 3 Everglades Challenges and set a number of records.

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 501 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 30, 31, 32, 33, 34

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group