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PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2014 11:09 am 
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Because of this thread length, I have made a Table of Contents. This Table is on P. 22, http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=7276&start=315

Wow! That is a great post, Bob. Great info.

Regarding your surprise that "expedition people" don't jump on this stuff: part of it is that the Everglades Challenge does not permit gas powered engines, for one. Second, people doing the EC are macho types when it comes to traveling on the water--they like to do it by paddle power. Now, some people, who are not big paddlers, can use a sail boat to accomplish the feat. But, there are "filters" that discourage large sail boats. It is, simply put, an adventure race for small human/sail powered boats. Don't take it personally; it does not reflect negatively on all the great innovations you have done on your TI. It is just for different boats and different folks.

Good luck on your adventures.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


Last edited by Chekika on Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 8:43 pm 
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Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
I am motivated from within by a natural curiosity and love for knowledge. :roll:
Well I was until I started reading some of those articles.
Now I am motivated to just go sail my TI.
Well at least while I absorb some of that engaging information.
My motivation is also to become a better sailor or more in command.
The information in the articles will help me along that road, so thank you Bob.
Once I have time to read more and absorb, I will post again.

Can't complain really. Went out yesterday - winds 0-9 mph temp temp 35-57 F.
So the motor helped and we kept warm with a bottle of green ginger wine.
One of the delights of sailing to feel the wine warm as it goes all the way down.
Although it is the middle of our winter, the sun was shining and navigating the
Port Adelaide river to the Birkenhead Hotel for lunch was a delight.

Now I feel refreshed, I'll get back to those articles. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 7:10 am 
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On May 25, 2014, YakAttaque wrote:
I recommend buying the TI, for solo expedition trips

On Jul 6, 2014, YakAttaque wrote:
Being in Oregon, I haven't done the Everglades Challenge, but if I were, and I had the choice, I would go with the TI, because of the dryer ride and longer waterline.

In 2 weeks I start a 2 week-long trip from northern Vancouver Island, where there are 23 foot tides (2nd biggest in the world), almost all 'beaches' are rocks covered with slick seaweed, and one may have a small surf to deal with. My plan is to pack in such a way that I can offload/onload easily, to lighten the yak. I'll update on how it went.

YakAttaque


Where is YakAttaque? Where is his update of his trip to northern Vancouver Island with his TI?

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 10:34 am 
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Location: South Florida
Proposed Trip: Chokoloskee to Pavilion, Nov 30-Dec 2 (or 3)

First AI/TI trip of the season (for Nancy & me, at least).

After a summer of camping all over the northwest (mostly Washington, Idaho, and Utah), driving over a downed tree across the road in the middle of the night, fishing for salmon, driving through Kansas and Missouri to Indianapolis, and returning to Miami by plane, I’m finally beginning to think about our first trip of the season. However, first, Nancy and I are traveling to Europe to visit our Grandson who is studying abroad this semester. I’m hoping we can squeeze a trip in after Thanksgiving. Here are the dates/location I suggest.

With these dates (Nov 30-Dec 2 or 3), I’m trying to avoid the Thanksgiving crowd and precede the Christmas tourists—of course, we have to catch some decent tides in and out the passes. The plan would be to launch from Chokoloskee at about 10:30 am, Sunday, Nov 30. For returning to Chok on Tues, Dec 2, boats should be on the water no later than 9:00 am in order to catch a nice incoming ride through the passes. If returning on Wed, Dec 3, we can be a little more leisurely, but we should be on the water by 9:30 am or so. Catching a favorable current through the passes is critical, because opposing currents can be brutal.

I hope you can join us to kick off the “winter” camping season. Some people (Debbie and Tom Turner and Royd Whedon) have some serious WaterTribe adventures to share. Two of us, Rick Parks and I, are actually thinking about doing the 2015 Everglades Challenge. That is almost 4 months to the day.

Please let me know ASAP if you can do this trip. If you have any questions, just ask here or send an email. I can be contacted at kwellma@gmail.com I will be out of the country from Nov 6-18.

If you have never done any of these "pleasure" trips with us or been to the Everglades, this can be considered a "beginner" trip. Pavilion Key is a beautiful place to camp with lots of options.

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:42 pm 
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Just got back from a very successful trip out of Chokoloskee to Pavilion Key. I hope to write up a report before long. That trip was squeezed in after Thanksgiving, and lots of people could not attend. Here is another trip, but to Middle Cape out of Flamingo. Hope some of you can make it.

Flamingo to Middle Cape, Dec 15-18, 2015

Dec 15, Monday--Launch from FLM at some reasonable hour on Dec 15--make MidCape, 15 mi away. Set up camp.
Dec 16, Tuesday--Fish, hike the shoreline, sail, take lots of pics/video on land and water. Depending on the weather, fishing could be very good (or average.)
Dec 17, Wednesday--Same as Tuesday.
Dec 18, Thursday--get packed early to launch for FLM at 9 AM. We will ride the tide back in (and probably have to tack against the prevailing winds out of the east.)

All our trips are fishing trips, even if it is crummy weather for fishing. On this trip, I'm hoping for some interesting fishing on a falling tide at the confluence of the west entrance of Ingraham Lake and the Gulf of Mexico.

If you have questions or want to join the trip, email me at kwellma at gmail dot com or call 305-666-4184 or 305-979-3362. Do this ASAP so we can make more specific plans.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:55 am 
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Advice to a Friend

I know you have had a lot of sun exposure—it’s obvious. Nancy had our first “family” skin cancer. She was probably about 55 or so. In a sense, that was fortunate for me, because when I had my first, I was attuned to the possibility. My first was at the base of my throat—right in the area which would be exposed because I was wearing a button shirt. That first was a “squamous cell” carcinoma—a mildly aggressive cancer. The second was almost in the same place. It was a “basal cell”—the least aggressive of the common carcinomas. The 3rd was a melanoma—almost 7 yrs ago, when I was about 73. Unfortunately, I can’t establish w/o going to my dermatologist when the basal cell was removed, but I think it was about when I was 69-70. I also don’t know when the squamous cell was removed but I think it might have been when I was about 63-65. The squamous and basal cell cancers were removed in an office setting. The melanoma was a much more serious operation—while it had not spread, melanomas are very aggressive and can get into your lymph node system and from there spread throughout your body, especially to your brain, lungs and stomach.

The point of my discussion of age and my “grand slam” of skin cancers, is that you are approaching the age when my cancers started showing up—they can take decades to show up. I know you said you did not have any insurance. That situation may encourage you to “ignore” something that may be skin cancer. As I’m sure you realize, that can be very dangerous, and I encourage you to have any suspicious growth checked—any pimple, wart, scab that does not clear up. My squamous and basal cell cancers both looked like a pimple, but they each had a “raw” feel when I touched them. My melanoma was a small “wart” which popped up one summer. Melanoma’s tend to develop into full blown scabs. Even in their early stages, like mine, they have reddish brown colorations (dried blood, really.)

Bottom line, please check yourself regularly, and immediately get care for any suspicious spots that might show up. In all likelihood, you will be the one to first find a skin cancer. I’m sorry to be so alarmist, but, with your sun exposure, I don’t want you to be complacent. Hopefully, you will be one of those people who is not as sensitive to sun as us Norwegians (blond hair and/or blue eyes.) BTW, Nancy has had 2 skin cancers—she is of Polish descent. Those of us on the water a lot have to be especially careful.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:21 pm 
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Very sound advice there Keith. I totally agree.
As one who recently had a BCC removed from the top of his head (I'll spare everyone the gory pics but it involved over a dozen stitches externally, with more internally and a haircut like Friar Tuck). The BCC was directly under a vent on my bicycle helmet and over the years I unwittingly copped a lot of sun exposure, especially as my hair has thinned out somewhat up top.
I now wear a sweat cap under the helmet which blocks the sun and I visit the skin specialist yearly.
On the kayak I take sun protection very seriously and cover up as much as I can. Long sleeves, long pants, brimmed hat, face buff, gloves etc. Looks ridiculous I know but I don't care:
Image

BTW- it might be timely to visit this old post from Slaughter ...but only if you have a strong stomach!
viewtopic.php?f=71&t=26702&p=110883


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:04 pm 
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Stringy, that picture of Slaughter ought to be posted at all tanning machine services. It certainly underlines the point I'm trying to make above. Here is my on-water picture:

Image

My melanoma was located just where the Ruff (neck gator) meets the outside edge of my sunglasses. Although I wear a Ruff at all times on the water, it frequently slides down on the sides. I do try to remember to put sunblock on the places that are exposed when the Ruff slips a bit.

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 9:29 pm 
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Lookin just as good as I do on the water Keith! :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:30 pm 
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Location: Lake Macquarie NSW AUSTRALIA
It’s a good idea fellas to revisit this topic at least once a year to refresh our sun protection procedures. A couple of points. First of all Stringy, it’s not up to you to say how ridiculous you look in that getup, that’s my job. :lol: Very sensible, your HSE Officer would be proud :wink: . Thank god you and Nancy got to all your spots before they turned into something more nasty Keith. Yep, I was in 2 minds as to whether or not to post that photo of my forehead but I thought that if it shocks just 1 person into covering up, then that’s a good result.
( the face was confronting enough before the surgery let alone after )

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Don't take life too seriously................it ain't permanent.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 4:09 am 
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First Trip of the Season—Chokoloskee to Pavilion Key

Nov 29-Dec 3, 2014


We left Chokoloskee near high tide. This is not a selfie, but, rather, a picture of Alison and Royd Whedon coming up behind me in the pass out to the Gulf of Mexico.
Image

Nice to see this osprey couple is back preparing for another brood.
Image


As planned, Henry Ovares and Joe Slama were on Pavilion Key ahead of us. They had picked up the permit. I’m the one on the right here. Joe has that beard because he is scheduled to play Santa Claus this Xmas.
Image


This is Henry & Joe out fishing the next day before they returned to Everglades City (neighboring village to Chokoloskee.)
Image


Royd took this picture of me as I’m enjoying dinner and sundown.
Image


It was a beautiful sunset.
Image


People were coming and going each day of this trip. No sooner had Henry and Joe left, then Joshua Morgan arrived in his sea pearl. Royd is there to lend a hand.
Image


Last year, Josh came out in a canoe. Here he is carrying it, fully loaded, to the water.
Image


The year before on Cape Romano, he was using an 18’ Stellar sea kayak. Here Nancy inspects his gear on Cape Romano. Josh loaded this sea kayak with his gear and literally carried it single-handedly to the water.
Image


In 2012, Josh came the 9.5 miles to Pavilion on a paddle board with all his camping gear.
Image


This year with his sea pearl, he brought a corresponding increase in size and amount of gear. Royd and Alison help him set up a sun shade.
Image


The second night of a trip is always a fish fry night. This 20.5” sea trout was enough to feed the four of us.
Image


Josh at our blue plate special fish fry.
Image


We had another beautiful sunset.
Image


Just fooling around with my camera to see what kind of a moon shot I could get.
Image


Next morning a Park Ranger paid us a courtesy call. I sometimes think the Rangers come down to see all our boats and gear.
Image


Josh had planned to spend the day sailing, but one of his sails ripped on the way out, so he headed back. Alison and Royd give him a hand.
Image


The beach manager, Bob, is on security duty up high today.
Image


Bob has an apprentice. He is demonstrating the proper way to inspect a beach. The strut is very important.
Image


It was a beautiful morning on our last day.
Image


Royd makes a final inspection before launching. As big as the TI is, a couple can carry all the gear and coolers they want to use, but they must put much of it on the hakas and in the rear.
Image


Because I now put all heavy gear on my hakas or rear storage area, my AI no longer dives—it is a nuisance of the past. Nevertheless, it still cuts waves. Here (below) my bow “wave buster” is disrupting a wave coming over the bow. It looks like a dramatic splash, but only reaches my feet.
Image


Back in Chokoloskee, Alison and Royd have begun the real packing.
Image


Great trip, great friends, and reliable boats—what more can you ask? If Nancy hadn’t had house guests, she could have enjoyed the trip too.

Keith

Image

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 10:40 pm 
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Location: Salem, Oregon USA
Chekika wrote:
On May 25, 2014, YakAttaque wrote:
I recommend buying the TI, for solo expedition trips

On Jul 6, 2014, YakAttaque wrote:
Being in Oregon, I haven't done the Everglades Challenge, but if I were, and I had the choice, I would go with the TI, because of the dryer ride and longer waterline.

In 2 weeks I start a 2 week-long trip from northern Vancouver Island, where there are 23 foot tides (2nd biggest in the world), almost all 'beaches' are rocks covered with slick seaweed, and one may have a small surf to deal with. My plan is to pack in such a way that I can offload/onload easily, to lighten the yak. I'll update on how it went.

YakAttaque


Where is YakAttaque? Where is his update of his trip to northern Vancouver Island with his TI?

Keith

Hi Keith

Just came across this today! I looked for the thread with my comments but couldn't locate it; but I did the trip and made a video of it (link below). It was the most spectacular trip I've ever taken. Within the first hour of leaving the boat ramp at Telegraph Cove, BC, I past a huge whirlpool, saw a colony of bald eagles, sailed along two types of dolphins, and was surrounded by curious humpback whales on 4 sides. One day I came across a bear swimming across my path, and almost sailed into the jaws of three whales, mouths open with the tide flowing through them (they submerged when I banged my paddle against the TI).
I'm going to do this trip again early next August. (looking for fellow Islands to meet-up this time)
:o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbbog9acYyw&list=UUbZIWYAhKS59XJhUwbdzxIg


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:53 am 
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Wow, what an awesome collection of great experiences, any one of which would have satisfied me! Yakattaque, that video is simply stunning... I wanted to be there with you.

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:36 pm 
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What Tony said!
Thanks for sharing both those trip reports Keith and YakAttaque. 8)


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:57 pm 
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Yes, excellent video YakAttaque. No question the northwest, British Columbia, & Alaska are some of the most stunning parts of the US & Canada.

Yak, it looks to me from your video that you were pulling out each day at high tide. Is that correct? In other words you did not have to haul your TI up 10-20' to get it above high tide line. Did you ever sleep on you boat, on the water? Seems that might be tough with the tides changing on the order of 15-20' per tide change.

When your TI was perched on top of that rock 10' above water, did you do a seal launch off that rock?

Keith

_________________
I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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