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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:32 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:07 am
Posts: 598
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Great idea, yakaholic! I'll have to try that.

Chris, I'm reluctant to try a dry suit because the air temp will generally be warm and I'm afraid I'll be hot inside the suit. How warm can you go?

I like the Frogg Toggs because they're very light and breathable, so I don't get hot. I just don't like the wet butt thing.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2008 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 10:10 pm
Posts: 92
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Tom

Where did you get the red wind streamer that's in the picture on the red AI's sail? I'm looking for some kind of wind indicator and this looks like good possibility. Is that what you use it for? If so, how well does it work and what's it made of?

Thank you


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2008 10:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:19 pm
Posts: 72
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Howdy Yakaholic!

Your idea of tape over the front 2/3 of the scupper holes and a cushion seat is excellent (I will, however, say that the Hobie seat is engineered to give well appreciated back support after 6 plus miles of pedaling which will be lost with that extra cushion height). I have no doubt it will keep you from sitting in water on a normal day. Good ideas and I trust your Florida experience with Florida temps. No argument on this from Wyoming.

However, full Gortex dry suits are key in my book.

I'm here to say a friend and I, sailing conservatively (quartering waves and keeping amas as best we could above water, furling the sails almost completely) were overtaken rather suddenly by very high wind and 3-4 foot steep waves on Yellowstone Lake. We literally were surfing above hull speed up to 200 feet on occasional waves. When one stopped, we dropped like a bowling ball down an elevator shaft, then the wave broke over us completely, not only filling the cockpit, but keeping it full of icey water that didn't immediately drain. Since large inland big lakes (such as Yellowstone and Michigan) frequently have large waves frequently coming in "triple sisters", the following 2 waves would often refill the cockpit before we were off and surfing another wave.

Once we figured out how seaworthy the Hobie AI's are, and that we wouldn't die, we fumbled along as best we could, had fun, and enjoyed a wonderful time over margueritas in a snowy camp that evening.

We continuing wearing our Kokatat full Gortex suits preparing dinner, then put them on first thing the next 20 degree morning preparing a luxurious Eggs Benedict breakfast complete with gourmet coffee.

This is why I promote full Gortex drysuits (including feet) When s**t hits the fan, they stack the deck to keep you comfortable, warm and alive. We probably would have lived (haven't died yet!), but were comfortable enuff to party.

Even in warmer latitudes, any water or rain cooler than your body temp will inevitably suck out core body temperature over time. Up here, your survival time can be 15-20 minutes or less in a swim suit. Our forum has had a guy from Hawaii saying in some conditions he wears a Gortex dry suit. I say, "Prepare for the worst, and if it doesn't occur, don't be a fool. Appreciate it and party on."

We'll soon retire our AI's up for the season, as lakes will be freezing over. Time to ski!

Happy Trails!

Chris

_________________
And in the end,
the love you take,
is equal to the love,
you make...
--The Beatles


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2008 11:19 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:19 pm
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Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Howdy!

Responding to Ray's most excellent question of how high temps can you go in a full Gortex Dry Suit...

We've had our suits on in the low 80's (plus) and been uncomfortably hot. However, dragging a bare hand in the water acts like a radiator, cooling you off. It works surprisingly well, but not perfectly. Please remember, our water temps here are cooler than many other areas. Isn't all of life and boating a compromise? Don't be tempted by loosening a zipper to let out heat. A dry suit filled up by water won't be countered by a life preserver; you'll end up fish food.

With kayaks in any area, you should always plan out upcoming "Thank God Coves", where you can hide from weather, pee, and perhaps prepare food while waiting for s**ty weather to pass. A good rule of thumb is to plan a max 2 hours between places to pee. It also generally works well for checking out weather changes. It's also perhaps a time for putting on stored dry suits.

I liken a full dry suit to a "Thank God Cove". If you don't need it, don't wear it. Put in behind you underneath bungees (doesn't take up much space), you can throw it on later (perhaps even putting it on while on the boat if necessary). No need to wear a tuxedo all the time unless you're Fred Astaire.

The major drawback to full drysuits is that they're expensive, but hey, they cost only 1/3 what we paid for our boats.

What's your life worth?

Happy Trails!

Chris

_________________
And in the end,
the love you take,
is equal to the love,
you make...
--The Beatles


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:50 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:07 am
Posts: 598
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Bob L. wrote:
Tom

Where did you get the red wind streamer that's in the picture on the red AI's sail? I'm looking for some kind of wind indicator and this looks like good possibility. Is that what you use it for? If so, how well does it work and what's it made of?

Thank you

Not my idea, I think it was reconion or yakaholic who suggested it. It's just a piece of ribbon. I bought a roll at MegaLoMart, in the Christmas section (in October, but whatever).

The ribbon I bought is extremely lightweight because it's a see-through mesh. Whoever had the idea suggested making it 5' long and tying it to the top batten, which is what I did.

My wife loves it. She is not good at reading ripples on the surface or otherwise detecting the apparent wind. I put a little wind indicator on her aka, but the downwash from the sail makes it worthless on a port tack - would need one on both akas to be really useful. The ribbon seems to really help her to properly trim her sail.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:58 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:07 am
Posts: 598
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Chris,

Thanks for your input on the dry suit. I was wondering about the whole stopping to pee thing. How hard would it be to get that thing off enough to pee while on the water?

I'm used to just wearing a bathing suit. If I'm out sailing and want to pee, I just scoot forward and let fly into the Mirage Drive well. OK, maybe a bit too much information, but wanted to give you the idea that I'm kind of spoiled. ;)

The other day I was about a half hour out from the ramp in open water when I had to pee. Wearing my Frogg Toggs. I stopped, stood up, partially undressed, and managed to pee without going swimming. I can imagine that due to the tight fit, a wetsuit or drysuit would make that operation more difficult.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:08 am
Posts: 30
Location: Yarmouth, Peoples Republik of Taxachusetts USA
Right after removing the sail bag, I slip this into the top of the mast (snug between the sail and the mast)...
It gives me an easy to see wind direction...
Image

The DODGER keeps the wind/spray off my hands and torso...
NO REGRETS!
The 2-piece Palm gortex dry suit continues to excell...AND...it has a "relief zipper"...
NO GOING BACK!
As the temps continue to drop here on the Cape of Cod, I've started wearing a Stearns Float Coat instead of the PFD...
Safe, Warm & Dry!

_________________
Designated Expendable


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:29 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:19 pm
Posts: 72
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Howdy!

Methods of peeing? We're getting off topic, but it's relevant, and here goes.

The male dry suit has a horizontal zipper at the crotch area. In placid water, it's effective to stand up, grab the sail and let'er rip.

In mild waves (or when other boats are nearby), I've had success grabbing an aka and lying prone on my side atop a gunnel.

The women's suit with a half moon zipper on the back is not nearly so easily accommodating. My beloved GF prefers landing every 2 hours or so for a break, snack and perhaps a snort of wine.

This may be obvious, but I'll pass it along. Every sport but kayaking recommends staying good and hydrating. In kayaking, it's prudent to balance on the edge of barely drinking enough water.

Back to drysuits... Yup, in Florida a dry suit may be overkill. However, when you reeely need a dry suit, nothing else comes close. On Lake Powell's 74 degree water early Oct, they were crucial.

In Florida, I wouldn't use one unless things looked dicey or it was raining.

Off to work,

Chris

_________________
And in the end,
the love you take,
is equal to the love,
you make...
--The Beatles


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 Post subject: Drysuit contact page
PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 28, 2008 8:54 am
Posts: 61
Location: Albuquerque
I use Mustang equipment exclusively for work. Very great sets of products including dry suits and liners, and for those who want to go lightweight on the PFD/life jacket check out their line of inflatable PFD's...very comfy on those blistering hot days in the New Mexico sun....sorry Florida...we get the sunny days most of the year.

http://www.mustangsurvival.com/products ... php?id=572


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